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After 44 hours constant journeying we arrived here about 7 o’Clock—on Wednesday morning. My companion Mr. C.—hearing that a party of his acquaintance had set off about an hour before for Fryburg a place 24 english miles distant from this—ordered fresh horses, invited me to join him and upon my pleading fatigue, was off himself alone in order as he observed to cause an agreeable surprise to his...
I hope you have duly received the letter which I wrote you, from New-York, giving you a regular account of my proceedings untill I reached that city. T he packet on board of which I took passage was detained by adverse winds untill Friday , the 18th: when we sailed at about 5 in the afternoon—Of all the passages by water that I ever made, this I think was the most perfectly pleasant, and in...
Last friday Evening, the 25th. Whitcomb to my great joy arrived and brought the tidings of your safe arrival at Washington; he was detained four days at New-York; so that your letter of the 16th. reached me at the same time—I enjoyed over again the happiness of your meeting with your parents and family; and as you are apprehensive of too much inconvenience on your journey hither without me, I...
The day after I last wrote you, I received your favour of 22d: Septr: and am much distress’d to find that you had again been ill with the cramps, and continued to suffer the pain in your hands which has so much afflicted us heretofore—I hope with you it is not imputable to the cause our friends apprehend, and that it will subside when the agitation upon your spirits occasioned by our tedious...
The mountains have vanished, and the ground is again bare in most places. the roads are excessive rough, and the weather uncommonly cold for March. I hope it will Soften & the Roads become smoother, before Saturday when I shall send in the carriage for you. I do not think that George will have the Measles. I thought that voyage to England, would end in a matrimonial engagement in Boston I wish...
I cannot neglect the Opportunity which Mr King’s return to America gives me of inquiring after Mr Adams & you; & still more particularly after my little Godson—; who is I hope in every respect as prosperous as he promised to be when he left Berlin. I am likewise troubling Mr King with an inkstand of our English China; which I wish you to keep upon your writing table as a souvenir of a distant...
I received this morning your letter of the 4th: instt: which gave me pleasure as containing the information of the children’s health; and sorrow by that of your own indisposition—The remainder of the letter was equally painful and unexpected to me—Our separation was very much against my inclination, but it was your own choice, and it has been my unvaried principle, and I hope will always be...
I left New-York last Thursday morning the 12th: at 9 O’Clock in the Packet Cordelia, the same we went in last October—Friday evening we reached Providence, after a short, but very boisterous passage—Yesterday, I came from Bost Providence to Boston, and here last Evening—Mr: Otis and Patty had been equally prosperous in their passage, and arrived in Boston last Monday, the eighth day after we...
I received a few days ago your kind favour of the 10th: instn: with the letter that accompanied, and thank you for the care of it—I lament to hear that your health continued so feeble and infirm, but I hope as the Spring advances, you will find yourself better—I approve much of your intention to wean John, and rejoyce at the information that he has recovered. I have been into Boston only once...
I was two days last week at Dedham, where there was a Court sitting, at which I had something to do—On Friday evening I received your letter of the 17th: of last Month—Yesterday, being at Boston I found your’s of the 24th: and rejoyce to hear of your all being so well—They ought not to have charged you with postage for my last Letter—However, 20 Cents is not worth disputing with them. Mr: and...
I have just received your’s of the 29th: of last month; since which I hope you have two from me—I feel the same anxiety to hear from you frequently which you mention, and grow uneasy, whenever four or five days pass without a letter—I rejoyce to learn that you and the children are in health; and sincerely sympathize in the distressing affliction, which has befallen Harriet.—The consolations...
Since my last letter to you I have not enjoyed the happiness of hearing from you—I hope however that you and the children have been and continue in good health, as well as your Mamma and all the family. I went into Boston on Saturday, and had all the things which Mrs: Whitcomb had procured for you ship’d on board the schooner Alert , Captain Smith, bound to Alexandria and Georgetown—They are...
I have received, my best friend, your kind and truly affectionate letter of the 12th: or rather 6th: instt: on which I find some of George’s taste for literature, as I presume by the scratches I take to be his hand-writing. It is not improbable but that my spirits have been some few degrees below the point of temperate warmth, and that my letters may have betrayed some marks of it—Yet my...
Altho I have not written to you since the return of your Husband to Quincy, I have had the pleasure of hearing weekly from you through him; and of learning that you, and the Children are well. I want to see the dear Boys, and regret that they are like to be so long seperated from me. George will forget us and John cannot know us. I have a great opinion of childrens being early attached to...
I should have answered your kind letter of the 13th. a day or two sooner, but for company which has fallen in, and call’d me away just at the time I devoted to the purpose of writing—Mr: & Mrs: Greenleaf of Cambridge, Charlotte Welsh, and her brother William, who has just returned from India, and Mr: Isaac Smith, and his Sister, who are here at this time—And yesterday, a tea-party of fifteen...
This morning I received your kind favour of the 20th. And am delighted to hear that you and the children are so well—Mrs. Hellen’s indisposition, I hope will prove only to be “the pleasing punishment that women bear”—I wish we could have here a little of that superfluity of rain which fell just before you wrote me; as it would bring forward my garden stuff as we call it—You have no idea, how...
I have now received your favour of the 29th: of last month, enclosing a letter from your Mamma, for Mr: Murdoch, which I shall take care to forward, by the first vessel that will go from Boston to England.— You had been so long without an attack of the spasms, that I had flattered myself they had taken their final leave—I grieve to hear of their return—Perhaps it may only be in consequence of...
Yesterday my mother went to Boston, and in the Evening brought out Mrs: Foster with her two children, one of whom is unwell, and requires the benefit of a little rural ai—But what was of more immediate consequence to myself, was your letter of the 6th: instt: which my mother also brought out, the profiles and all. One of your profiles is much more like than the other; and that of course I keep...
The Sun is just making his appearance for the first time these five days, during which we have had a cold North-East Storm, and almost continual rains—In the midst of this gloom, which has confined us closely to the house, I received your letter of the 10th: with the account of our dear child’s illness—It has distress’d me much; and though I hope it is only the previous indisposition to the...
On Thursday, I went into Boston, for the first time this month past, and there received at once your two letters of 14th: and 20th: of June. They alleviated in part, and only in part the heavy anxiety which has weighed on my Spirits for the health of the dear child—I hope the fine weather has return’d with you, so that you have been able to give him the benefit of the air and exercise—I cannot...
Yesterday, being in Boston on some business, I received your letter of the 26th: with the pleasing intelligence of the dear child’s recovery.—I had scarcely enjoyed a moment of unconcern since your first account of his illness; I hope his teeth have come through before this time, and that he will soon recover his strength so as to get upon his feet. At the same time with your letter I received...
A tour to Boston appears of late to bring me luck; yesterday, for the third time within this fortnight, I went there and found a letter from you—This was dated the 4th: and was written the same day that I on my part was writing to you, as I hope you have by this time perceived.—This repeated pleasure has in a great measure removed the aversion I had before to visiting the metropolis, and I...
My visit to Boston yesterday, was equally successful with those I had made several times before; for I found there your’s of the 9th: enclosing the profiles—I rejoyce to hear that your tour to Bladensburg has been of service to the health of the children—And I hope your visit to your aunt will prove equally so to them and to yourself. I sincerely sympathise with poor Pichon and his wife, at...
The delays in the receipt of my letters, of which you complain are occasioned sometimes by a delay in sending them to the Post-Office, and sometimes must be accounted for by the Post-Office itself—I have oftentimes suffered the same impatience to hear from you, and last evening after having been nearly a fortnight without a line from you, received together your kind letters of the 13th: and...
Your letter of 27 last month came to hand the day before yesterday—It renews and increases my concern for the health of the children, but as John’s teeth are now through, I indulge the flattering hope that he will entirely recover—We may reasonably hope that he will not again be troubled from the same cause, untill the severity of the Summer shall be past—But after all our hopes must rest...
I have received your letter of the 31st: of last month, with great pleasure to learn that the health of the children is better than it had been.—My anxiety for them, and especially for the youngest on hearing of his repeated illness has been so great as in some degree to affect my own health, and still more my Spirits—I depend however entirely upon you for their management, knowing and...
It is almost a fortnight since I received a line from you; and you have heretofore been so invariably punctual in writing me at least once a week, that for some days I have felt not a little concern lest this interruption of correspondance should have been occasioned by illness either of yourself or of the children—I encourage hopes however as much as possible, and discard as far as within my...
Another week has past away, without bringing me a line from my dearest friend—The last letter I have received from you was dated the 31st: of last month— I endeavour as much as possible to compose my mind with the hope that some accident at the Post–Office may have detained your letters since that time; but the thought that illness or some disaster must have befallen you or my dear children,...
Two days ago, I wrote you my best friend, expressing great anxiety at not having heard from you for almost a month—I therefore now add a line to mention that I received last evening your two letters of the 5th: and 12th: of this month; by the latter of which it appears that you had again been a day or two longer than usual without hearing from me—I have never failed to write you every week,...
Since I wrote you last Tuesday in Boston I have received another letter from you, dated the 21st. of August, which has completed the satisfaction I enjoyed in the receipt of those which had preceded it— After a painful expectation of nearly three weeks, I was thus compensated by four letters in the course of as many days— I was not mistaken in my calculation upon your punctuality, but am still...
I hope the head-ache with which you were afflicted at the time when you wrote me your letter—of the 4th: which I have received, did not outlast that day, and that it left you ever since to enjoy good health and Spirits—Mine are at present as good as my situation will permit, and excepting the temporary inconveniences arising from too free a use of fruit, on the ripening of the peaches, have...
I am in hopes there is a letter from you, lingering somewhere, at the Post-Office; not having received any, since I wrote you last; nor of course heard from you of a later date than the 4th: of this month. I have not been from Quincy since my last; nor shall probably more than once or twice, before my departure to rejoin you—My present intention is to leave this place about the twenty-first of...
After an interval of considerable anxiety, arising from the lapse of time, since I had heard from my dearest friend, I was at length at once confirmed in my apprehensions, and in some sort relieved from their alarm by your letter of the 14th: which however I did not receive untill the Evening before last—The Washington Post Mark on the cover was dated the 15th: but, I had sent into Boston to...
Once more is the correspondence on the part of my best friend brought up from all arrears; as I received since my last your two letters, of the 16th: and 23d: ulto: both together—I hope we shall on neither side be in arrears again, as I still hold the purpose of leaving this place, at latest a fortnight from to-morrow—It will give me great pleasure to meet you at Baltimore; but I cannot...
This is the last Time I shall write you from this place for the present—I have determined to accelerate my departure, and not wait untill the 22d. as I had heretofore proposed—On Wednesday next it is my intention to take passage in the Stage for Providence, but as the Stages now commence on the Winter establishment I do not expect to reach New-York earlier than the 22d: There I purpose to stop...
I congratulate you my dear Louissa, that our loss is to be your gain. mr Adams leaves us on tuesday for washington, where I hope he will arrive in safety, and have a joyfull meeting with his family. I know from frequent experience how painfull it is to be thus seperated—I hope when he returns next Spring that you will be able to come with him, and that we may make Quincy an agreable residence...
I received yesterday your Letter of Novbr 27th. and was rejoiced to learn that you and the Children were well. I was just contemplating writing a Letter to my son to chide him for not writing to inform me, how George was grown, and improved, what he said when he saw his pappa again, and how mister John came on, whether he is as grave as his Brother George was how Master Georges socks fitted...
Inclosed you have a Letter, to mr Rutledge which you may if you like send to your Brother if you think it will be of any service to him. We yesterday received a few lines from mr Adams of the 14th from which I learnt you were all in tolerable Health, I want to know if his cough has left him, and whether he has any thing of the Rheumatism in his Limbs. I would have him pay particular attention...
I received two days since your Letter of Febry th 11. it containd information the most agreable that mr Adams was in better Health and Spirits is cheering news to me. I feared through want of attention to himself that his cough would fix upon his Lungs, and produce very allarming concequences—the time is fast approaching when Congress must rise, whether they have done good, or whether they...
The reason that you did not receive a Letter from me when you arrived at Philadelphia, was oweing to my being so sick that I could not write. I got your Brother to write, but not so soon as I should, if I had been able. as soon as I could hold my pen I wrote you a few lines, since which I have received your Letter from Newyork; I have rejoiced in the fine weather which has followed you ever...
I received your Letter of december 6th on the 14th and was very glad to hear of your safe arrival at washington; the journey at this Season when the days are so short must always be fatigueing. It must have been less so to you than it would have been with the children, tho I doubt not you must miss them very much. they are very well. John is as thick as he is long, has out grown his cloaths....
Your Letter of Jan’ry 6 I received last Evening. your Children are very well, and very well taken care of. so do not give yourself any anxious solisitude about them. I believe they are much better off than they could have been at any boarding House in washington, where they must have been confined in some degree; or have mixd with improper persons; with respect to John, the Child enjoys...
I shall begin my Letter by putting your mind at ease respecting your children, who are both very well. George I saw yesterday quite in Raptures; his uncle Cranch had made him a little Sled with a small box upon the top; similar to one which Dexter had made John; and which employs half his time. Sometimes to draw about miss Juno, who seems to like the ride very well, and sits in it as grave and...
Untill this day, I have been from the moment when I left you, in such continual motion that I have not had a moment of leisure to perform the promise I made, of writing to you on my way home—We had a rainy day from Washington to Baltimore, where I parted with Messrs: Tracy and Dana, on the moment of our arrival—Mr: McHenry having taken them both to his House—They were to come on two days...
The first pen I put to paper after reaching my journey’s end must be to inform you, my dearest friend, of that Event—I left New-York, at four O’Clock of the afternoon of the first of this Month; the same day that my last Letter to you was written—My Sister concluded to remain there with the Coll: at least for the present—Her prospects and those of her family, are of a gloomy cast, but I can...
I wrote you last Sunday, the day after my arrival at Quincy and gave you an account of the progress and termination of my journey from New-York. On Tuesday I went with my father to Cambridge to attend the inauguration of the new President of the College, Mr: Webber.—The ceremonies of the day were sufficiently dull—The performances mostly in Latin, with a comfortable proportion of English in...
The Children are both in perfect health; both contented with their situations, and both beloved by all around them—George appears to have lost none of his sensibility, but has a placidness and ease of temper, which must have come to him I think from some of his Remote Ancestors—He reads tolerably well, and still prides himself as much as ever in his learning. He agrees very well with his...
I wrote you this day week, last Sunday that I intended to return to Boston the next morning—But, I did not go untill Tuesday. I have been chiefly there untill yesterday afternoon when I came out in the Stage, and found the family here all well; and particularly both the children—The first thing John said to me was to enquire whether I had sent a kiss for him to Mamma—I cannot stay many days...
I expected to have this letter from Quincy, where it was my intention to have gone yesterday in the Stage— But it was to have called for me at Whitcomb’s where I still lodge, and by some mistake went away and left me. It was the cause of no small disappointment, as I had flattered myself with seeing our two darlings, for whom I had got a little book and a toy to give them from their Mama— But...
Yesterday was the first Saturday since I arrived here, which passed over without bringing me a letter from you; and although I am willing to hope that it may be owing to some delay at the Post-Office, or to some accident which prevented your writing at the usual time, I cannot help feeling some degree of uneasiness least the omission should have been caused by the state of your health—Indeed...