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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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AU NOM DU ROI. Nous Ambassadeur de S. M. le Roi de France près S. M. l’Empereur de toutes les Russies prions les Officiers Civils et Militaires, chargés de maintenir l’ordre public dans tous les Pays amis ou alliés de la France, de laisser librement passer Madame Louise Catherine Adams et Monsieur charles Francois Adams son fils, se rendant à Paris avec leurs domestiques. et de leur donner...
Mr Allston presents his compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams—he will do himself the honour to wait on them agreeably to thier invitation MHi : Adams Papers.
Sont invitées de la part de Mme Colombi et de celle de Mr. François Colombi à assister aux cérémonies funèbres d’Antoine Colombi, leur Époux et frère, qui auront lieu Lundi 20 Mars, dans l’Église Catholique, à 10 heures du matin. MQA .
I would not come to Town to day because I knew I should only add to yours, and my own agony, my Heart is with you, my prayers and blessing attend you, the dear Children you have left, will be dearer to me for the absence of their parents, and my care whilst, Providence continues to me my faculties, and my Life. If your Father and I Should be removed, they cannot fail of finding Friends and...
I address you jointly and congratulate you upon the fine weather we have had since you commenced your journey I hope e’er this day, you have reached washington in safety , with your dear little Boy; for whose Safety, I was not a little anxious through so long and fatigueing a journey. We had the pleasure to receive a Letter from you, informing us of your arrival at New york— The week after you...
Mr Pinkney presents his Complements to Mr & Mrs Adams and will have the Honour to wait on them at Dinner on Thursday the 3d of February.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr. & Mrs. Cook ask leave to present to Mr. & Mrs. Adams the Compts. of the Season— Your Letters do much good, are treated with very great respect indeed —I think you have now more influence than when here—not mere opinions in which you deal very sparingly but the excellent Arguments & reasons you give for every conclusion— As I flatter myself with the Hope of more of your Favours embracing an...
The reason that you did not receive a Letter from me when you arrived at Philadelphia, was oweing to my being so sick that I could not write. I got your Brother to write, but not so soon as I should, if I had been able. as soon as I could hold my pen I wrote you a few lines, since which I have received your Letter from Newyork; I have rejoiced in the fine weather which has followed you ever...
The Master of the Ceremonies is commanded by His Royal Highness The Prince Regent to invite The American Minister and Mrs. Adams to The Queen’s Palace on Monday next the 22d. Instant between Eight and half past Eight O’clock in the Evening, to be present at the Ceremony of the Marriage of Her Royal Highness The Princess Mary with His Royal Highness The Duke of Gloucester.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr. Marshall accepts with great pleasure the invitation of Mr and Mrs. Adams to dine with them on friday the 3d. of March at five MHi : Endicott Family Autograph Collection.
Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
I must beg of you to tell the Doctor to give me and my brother our pay they are going to arrest me of Breaking down the door of Number one and I and my brother say we did not do that I think we ought to have our pay Mr Stradway wont give it to me I am your affectionate Son MBAt .
I received yesterday your Letter of Novbr 27th. and was rejoiced to learn that you and the Children were well. I was just contemplating writing a Letter to my son to chide him for not writing to inform me, how George was grown, and improved, what he said when he saw his pappa again, and how mister John came on, whether he is as grave as his Brother George was how Master Georges socks fitted...
It is sometimes said that suspense is worse than the certainty of evil—But it is a hard relief from suspense to be informed of evils worse than were apprehended. From the length of time which had pass’d without bringing me a letter from you, I felt great anxiety; but it was principally for the dear child, whom I had left so unwell—Your letter when it came, announced to me not only the child...
Captain Bates arrived here yesterday morning, from Amsterdam, and has lent me a number of American Newspapers, of the month of August, and to the first of September inclusive—They were brought by the Dutch vessel, the Prince of Orange, arrived at the Texel—The same that had touched at Havre de Grace—The Dutch Minister, Mr Changuion had gone in her to America, conveyed by the Ajax, a Dutch...
I have received only one letter from you—that of 25. Novr: since I left you—And none from any of my other friends—Though I accustom myself to Patience in the expectation of Letters I begin to feel extremely anxious; lest some of you should be ill—The Mails have been interrupted by the obstructions in the Roads, and I have imputed the delay of your letters to this as long as I could—But we have...
Mr Harris has the honor to hand herewith inclosed to Mrs Adams the several passports and Letters Required for her journey to Berlin and Paris. Vizt. 1. Padrogena or order for Relays; to which is Subjoined a Circular Letter from the Minister of the Interior, to the Post Masters on the Road— This paper had better be given in Charge to the Confidential Servant, as it will be necessary to produce...
My last Letter accounted regularly for my progress from Stockholm, only as far as Oerebro, where I arrived, at 11. O’Clock on Friday Evening 3. June. My Servant according to my directions had waited for me there—I immediately made up his ticket or Marche-route for the next day; allowing for the Stages, at the same rate of time that I had untill then found necessary. I dispatched him...
I received this morning your letter of the 4th: instt: which gave me pleasure as containing the information of the children’s health; and sorrow by that of your own indisposition—The remainder of the letter was equally painful and unexpected to me—Our separation was very much against my inclination, but it was your own choice, and it has been my unvaried principle, and I hope will always be...
The wind, which had been blowing for ten days to the Westward having yesterday become fair, Captain Angus went up to Gothenburg, and informed Mr Russell and me that he was ready to sail—We determined to embark immediately, and I had barely time to close my Letter for you, which went by the Yesterday’s Post—The Ship was laying about three Miles below the City, and we came on board, about 8...
Last Evening I received a letter from Mr William Wyer, (I suppose a brother of the Consul at Riga) dated the 4th: instant, at Bordeaux. He informs me that he embarked at New-York on the 24th: of October, in the Swedish Ship Gustaf Adolph, and arrived at Le Rochelle—This is the vessel by which the rumour at New-York of the capture of Drummond’s army, was brought—Mr: Wyer mentions it in his...
After an interval of considerable anxiety, arising from the lapse of time, since I had heard from my dearest friend, I was at length at once confirmed in my apprehensions, and in some sort relieved from their alarm by your letter of the 14th: which however I did not receive untill the Evening before last—The Washington Post Mark on the cover was dated the 15th: but, I had sent into Boston to...
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
My visit to Boston yesterday, was equally successful with those I had made several times before; for I found there your’s of the 9th: enclosing the profiles—I rejoyce to hear that your tour to Bladensburg has been of service to the health of the children—And I hope your visit to your aunt will prove equally so to them and to yourself. I sincerely sympathise with poor Pichon and his wife, at...
This extraordinary season has prevented all ideas of regular correspondence for few employments are so irksome as writing when the thermometer stands at 100, but it is so agreeable to receive letters from home that one endeavours to seize every opportunity to obtain them. Grandfather has been favoured lately with a visit from his highness the Duke of Saxe Weimar, a gentleman who intends soon...
Will you, and Mr. Adams attend my marriage which is to be on Thursday Eve. at the Duke of Wellington at 9 Oclock—he has just desired me to write, and say he shall be very happy to see you—as he is to give me away, he wishes it should be at his house— believe me my dear Mrs Adams—very truly / yours MHi : Adams Papers.
The day before Yesterday, I received the first of your Letters numbered by yourself—The number, 13, was exact, as you will see by my acknowledgments of the receipt of the twelve that preceded it; but in the date, 24 June, I apprehend there is a mistake—for your preceding Letter, number 12, which I received last Week was also dated 24. June; and then you had received neither of mine from...
Since the departure of Mr Gallatin, I am left here the only remnant of what was called the Congress of Ghent—Instead of the continual succession of Americans coming and going, I am now reduced to the Society of the hospitable Inhabitants of this City, and of Mr and Mrs: Smith—Instead of the painful suspense and expectation of irritating Notes, alternating with the anxious labours of replying...
Your Journals to the inclusive have been regularly received, and have become a sort of necessary of life to George and me—Whatever the Cause of the Confidence which you say you have but recently acquired of writing to me whatever comes into your head, as I am the principal gainer by the acquisition—hope it will be permanent—Your advice is always acceptable, and if I do not always profit by it,...