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I am indebted to you for several very entertaining Letters, while I have not any thing in return to amuse you with. Some marriages amongst the young folk are taking place, miss E Gerry last week to a Major Townsend. Susan was at the visit party. She is well married it is Said. a daughter of doctor Hoolbrooks to a mr Vincet, Brother to mrs E Everet who was lately in England. miss Hoolbrook is...
This is the last day of Sep’br, and the month is thus far expended, without my addressing a line to you in reply to your Letter of June 27th. I have now Seizd my pen, that the Swift winged hours, may no longer leave me your Debtor. By your Letter I learn that Mars and Belona, have quitted the Stage, to give place to Venus and Cupid, and the Loud Clangor of Arms, is lulled into a soft Hymanal...
I have received your kind Letter of June the 7th, tho not by Mrs Perkins, for she has not yet arrived—I thank you for the information which it afforded me. your Letters are a treat from which I derive pleasure uncloyed—I can return you only the passing scenes of domestic and rural Life, interesting only for their connection with the Family Circle.— Two of your Neices, and my Granddaughters,...
The Master of the Ceremonies is commanded by His Royal Highness The Prince Regent to invite The American Minister and Mrs. Adams to The Queen’s Palace on Monday next the 22d. Instant between Eight and half past Eight O’clock in the Evening, to be present at the Ceremony of the Marriage of Her Royal Highness The Princess Mary with His Royal Highness The Duke of Gloucester.— MHi : Adams Papers.
How very kind of you my beloved Mrs Adams to answer my dull letter so immediately You can form no idea of the pleasure I felt at knowing that so far from forgetting us that time or distance has not lessened that friendship I valued so much—let me endulge the hope that change of scene has softened the woes we are all born to endure—it is now 26 years that I lost a sweet baby a little younger...
I have to acknowledge your obligeing Letter of June the 18th, and to thank you for the communications—our News papers had previously announced the presentation of mrs Adams at the Queens drawing Room, and copied from the morning Chronical, the distinguishd elegance and taste of her dress. This has Set the wits of all our Bells to work, to find out what Lama triming is, that Elegant article not...
Altho’ I have repeatedly written to you Since I received a Letter from you, I am not critical in that respect. judging from my own feelings, I think a Letter from a Friend always acceptable and altho’ they cannot be so interesting to you, as when your sons were with me, yet they may convey the assuriance of the Love and regard of which I bear you; and the interest I take in whatever concerns...
I never know how to let a vessel go from Boston, without a Letter to Some of the Family. I have just written by the Mary, for Liverpool, but as a Gentleman calld yesterday to request Letters, I have given him one, for my Son, and one for mr Smith. this I have directed to be put in the Bag, as it incloses one from your Sister Hellen, which She Sent one for you— Mr Brooks has taken charge of the...
By a vessel which saild a week since, I wrote to my Son, and Grandson’s. by this I shall write only to you, and acknowledge your favour of 2d Jan’ry. I was very sorry to learn that George had been attack’d with a Rheumatic complaint, a disorder, which when once in the constitution, continues a torment through Life. Georges Growth, has been so rapid, that he must not be forced to great...
I always like to send to every one some token of remembrance by writing to each, altho, I á derth of Subjects at the present day will not afford matter for amusement; a Letter upon Literary subjects, is not wanted in a country which abounds in every work of the kind, but as I do not consider, myself capable of being a reviewer—I shall only speak my private opinion, many of the modern writers...
I have already written to you by this vessel. her sailing haveing been delayed, I have the opportunity of acknowledging your Letter dated in Jan’ry, The contents of which are so flattering & complimentary, that I know not how to replie to it.—In the days of my youth, Female Education was very little attended to, in this Country beyond reading, and writing, and Arithmatic. a few rare instances...
I attempted to write to you, by Captain Bronson in Jan’ry but my strength failed me, and I have been ever since, in so low, and debilitated a state of Health, as to despair of ever recovering strength again, but for the last ten days, I have gained some, and my physician, encourages me, that I shall be benefitted by the returning Spring. I have not had any disease, such as fever, cough, or...
I must beg of you to tell the Doctor to give me and my brother our pay they are going to arrest me of Breaking down the door of Number one and I and my brother say we did not do that I think we ought to have our pay Mr Stradway wont give it to me I am your affectionate Son MBAt .
Mr Allston presents his compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams—he will do himself the honour to wait on them agreeably to thier invitation MHi : Adams Papers.
It was with great pleasure that I received and read your Letter of August 6th from Ealing, and it communicated to me a double portion of delight, as it appeard to be the emanation of a mind more at ease, than you experienced in that cold dark region of Russia—Altho the climate of G Britain is much more humid than that of America, and you can never as the proverb, says praise a fair day, untill...
I must inclose a Note to you, to Say that this morning the mail from Utica in N york, informd me that I am again a Great Grandmother, Abbe Johnson was deliverd of a son upon the 3rd. of this Month, mr Johnson writes that he has a head of Black hair and black Eyes. a fine Boy you may be sure. and that he has taken the Liberty to call him after his Great Grandfather, Mother and Babe well upon...
I have to acknowledge a very tender and affectionate Letter from you, bearing date 8th Janry 1814, which I received only a few days since.—Sympathy from those we Love, when affliction assail us, is balm to the Bleading Bosom, and assuages the wound it cannot heal, and which is opened affresh. "when Memory with busy art will o’er the heart Strings play wake tender strains, tho full of smart Nor...
Your Letter of July 9th was joyfully received by me, it was not untill your Letter arrived, that I had any certain knowledge where you were, altho I had presumed from mr Adams Letter of 19 March from Paris, that you might have reachd there, the day after your Sister Smith left it. It grieves me to Say to you, that she has, had a Severe trial and affliction since she arrived in America, in the...
If my dear Mrs Adams does justice to herself, she must be sure that no one that ever knew her can forget her, or cease to love and admire her—time or distance has not lessened my affection or made me indifferent to the happiness of a friend so deservedly dear to my heart, I learn that Mr Adams is appointed to and is actually in London—I conclude you wd not remain in Petersburg I send this...
Altho I have not the pleasure to acknowledg any Letter from you of a more recent date, than one by mr Forbes of Sep’ber last, which I only received a few days since, I will thank you for that, and am happy that I can congratulate you, upon a change in the aspect of our National affairs since that date, when they appeard to us in America; in not much less of a gloomy cast than to you in St...
Altho I cannot have the pleasure of acknowledging any Letter from you of a more recent date than one by mr Forbes last Sep’br, I will thank you for that, altho only received a few days Since—I am happy that I can congratulate you upon a change in the aspect of publick affairs respecting our own County. Since that date—the return of peace was haild here by all parties, and the first Spontanious...
As I hope you are now in a Situation both to receive Letters, and write them with more Security that they will reach their destination. I flatter myself that I Shall hear oftner from you. By the Amsterdam packet which is to Sail on Sunday, I Shall endeavour to Send this Letter, and as I have lately written by an other vessel to my Son, I Shall address this to you, to congratulate you, as I...
It was with great pleasure, that I received your Letter from St. Petersburgh, bearing date july the 10th 1814 forwarded by mr Smith and your Sister, who from a combination of circumstances were detaind abroad: untill the 2d of May 1815 when they happily arrived in N york—bringing with them the pleasing, intelligence that you had reach’d Paris—the day after they left it— I cannot describe to...
I address you, altho I know not where to find you, which is, and has been a source of much anxiety to me, four months have elapsed since the signature of the Treaty of Peace; when mr Adams wrote from Ghent, that in ten day’s, he should go to Paris, and from thence, send on to St petersburgh, to request you to join him there, and if he should, (as was expected,) be sent to England, that your...
In the course of four days I received your last Letter from St: Petersburg of 12 Feby. That from Riga and of 17 and 20. Feby. and that from Berlin of the 5th: of this Month—I had addressed a Letter to you at Konigsberg on the 19th: of February, and one at Berlin on the first of March, both of which must have arrived after you had passed through those places—I had requested you to inform me by...
Your Letter N. 8. dated 31. January, which I received on Sunday last has explained the mistake in the date of the preceding number—If you left St Petersburg so soon as 5. February, it is doubtful whether my last, dated the 19th: of last Month and enclosed to Messrs: Schwenk and Koch at Königsberg, will reach that place in time to meet you there; or whether the present will find you at...
I hasten to acknowledge the receipt of the letter you did me the honor to write me from Riga, dated the 5th. inst. from R o.S. and I rejoice to learn by it that your journey to that place has been both expeditious & made without difficulty or accident. I shall not fail to inform Mr de Kazadaedeff, as you have requested, of the high Sense you have of the attentions his orders procured you on...
After informing you by my last Letter of my arrival in this City, and of the Hotel where I had taken up my abode, I have suspended my Communications to you, under the expectation and the hope that you will have left St: Petersburg, before any further Letters from me could reach you there by the Post—Even that Letter may have to travel back after you as far as Riga, if you take your departure...
Mr Harris has the honor to hand herewith inclosed to Mrs Adams the several passports and Letters Required for her journey to Berlin and Paris. Vizt. 1. Padrogena or order for Relays; to which is Subjoined a Circular Letter from the Minister of the Interior, to the Post Masters on the Road— This paper had better be given in Charge to the Confidential Servant, as it will be necessary to produce...
AU NOM DU ROI. Nous Ambassadeur de S. M. le Roi de France près S. M. l’Empereur de toutes les Russies prions les Officiers Civils et Militaires, chargés de maintenir l’ordre public dans tous les Pays amis ou alliés de la France, de laisser librement passer Madame Louise Catherine Adams et Monsieur charles Francois Adams son fils, se rendant à Paris avec leurs domestiques. et de leur donner...
Paris. Hotel du Nord, Rue de Richelieu—Saturday 4. Feby: 1815. I arrived here at one O’Clock this afternoon, having left Bruxelles on Thursday Morning between five and six. It has been a solitary journey, and the roads, which are paved the whole way, as bad as they could be—If it were not for the pavement they would be nearly impassable—There was here and there a remnant of snow, at the sides...
From all that I have yet seen of Bruxelles, I find it so agreeable that I almost regret not having determined to stay and wait for your arrival here; without going to Paris at-all; or at least not without having your company—But the impulse of motion being given, the power of inertness operates upon me so forcibly that I find myself uneasy almost without knowing why; and have determined to...
Received of Mrs. Adams through the hands of Levett Harris Esq: Two Silver Loan Obligations of 5000 R Silver each Seven do. do. of 1000 R: do: Twelve do. do: of 500 R: do. with the Interest Coupons belonging to them, making in the whole Twenty Three Thousand Rubles Silver as Capital further Five Thousand Rubles BA. which we shall hold subject to the orders & at the disposal of His Excellency...
Meyer & Bruxner have the honor to send Mrs. Adams the balance of the account transmitted of Four Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy Rubles BA. by the bearer sealed up & by desire of M Harris they will send the same man on Friday morning to fetch the Trunks which they are to take under their care—. MHi : Adams Papers.
Me voici, at length out of Ghent; though I believe it had not been for the shame of fixing so many times a day for departure, and still postponing the act I should have stayed there a fortnight longer—The natural philosophers say that inertness is one of the properties of matter—By which they understand the aptitude of remaining in whatever situation it is, whether in motion or at rest—Thus...
Although I have been since I wrote you last Friday constantly engaged in preparing for my departure, I have not been able to get away this day as I had intended, and it is possible that I may not go before the last of the week; beyond that time I do not see the prospect of being detained, and indeed my present intention is to start the day after to-morrow—If I pass Friday I shall write you...
I received yesterday Morning your’s of 27. December number 54—and readily excuse the omission of a Letter on the Birth-day in the satisfaction of reflecting that you were at that time partaking in the celebration of a day memorable in the annals of Russia, as it will henceforth be memorable in those of our Country, and particularly memorable in the days of my life—It is yet for my Country to...
Since the departure of Mr Gallatin, I am left here the only remnant of what was called the Congress of Ghent—Instead of the continual succession of Americans coming and going, I am now reduced to the Society of the hospitable Inhabitants of this City, and of Mr and Mrs: Smith—Instead of the painful suspense and expectation of irritating Notes, alternating with the anxious labours of replying...
Your two Letters of 15 and 16. December were delivered to me yesterday Morning, and are numbers 51. and 52—The day before, I had received two from Mr Harris of December 14 and 21.—Harris always forwards his Letters by the way of Amsterdam; by which means they sometimes come quicker, though on the other hand they are sometimes delayed longer than yours which are forwarded directly, and which...
On Saturday morning, Mr: Goulburn took, the last of the British Legation, his departure for London, and Mr: Bayard and Mr: Clay, took theirs, together for Paris—Mr Gallatin proposes to go this day, and thenceforth I shall be the only member of either mission left here—When we signed the Treaty, I expected to have been prepared to leave the City by this day—Since then I have postponed my...
There is a news boy’s new year’s address, in vulgar doggerel Flemish verse, circulating with many others, but which it seems some of the printers declined publishing. It alludes to the Bon-mot of the Prince de Ligne about the Congress at Vienna—“Le Congrés danse , mais il ne marche pas”—and then recommends to the Sovereigns and great Ministers assembled at the Austrian Capital to turn their...
A happy New-Year! and many, many happy years to my dearest wife, and to my beloved Son Charles, and his far distant brothers!—It begins under better and more promising auspices, than we have known for many years; and may it please almighty God, that its progress and termination, may correspond with so propitious a commencement! You perceive that I dwell with delight upon the contemplation of...
Your Letter of 26. November was received by me last Sunday; but in writing to you on Tuesday, the account of the Peace and the arrangements consequent upon it, which I proposed to you for our meeting again, so absorbed my attention that I forgot to acknowledge the receipt of it—Yesterday Morning yours of the 2d: instant reached me, and is on my file, number 48—The inconvenience of the house in...
On Saturday last, the 24th: of December, the Emperor Alexander’s birth day a Treaty of Peace and Amity was signed by the British and American Plenipotentiaries in this City—I had written you the day before that there was to be a conference at 12 O’Clock—It lasted three hours, and the result of it was an agreement to meet the next day, at the Chartreux, the house where the British...
If in receiving two of your Letters at a time, I have some times mingled with the pleasure derived from them a thought of regret that one of the two had not reached me three or four days sooner, on Tuesday last it was with a very different Sentiment that I received your numbers 45 and 46 as I have marked them—one dated 22 November, and the other dated only of the Month, November, but which...
I shall make one effort more; to convey a Letter to you, and that by sending it to Ghent, where I really wish you were. Mr Adams has been detaind there; so much longer than he expeced that I feel very anxious for you; and for Charles, much more so, since I have learnt that mr and mrs Smith have also left you. through mr. Adams, I have heard oftner from you, than when you were both at St...
Our interval of leisure still continues—The British Messenger who took our last Note to England has not yet returned, but may now be expected from day to day. The policy of protracting, and avoiding a conclusion of any kind cannot be much longer continued—If as we have too much reason to apprehend there has been no sincerity in the late advances from that government towards conciliation we...
This appellation reminds me of an occurrence on Monday last, which I may tell you exactly as it happened, and which will shew you the sort of tone which my colleagues observe with me, and I with them.—We had been three hours in Conference with the British Plenipotentiaries; and it had been perhaps the most unpleasant one that we have held with them—We had returned home, and were in Session...
Last Evening I received a letter from Mr William Wyer, (I suppose a brother of the Consul at Riga) dated the 4th: instant, at Bordeaux. He informs me that he embarked at New-York on the 24th: of October, in the Swedish Ship Gustaf Adolph, and arrived at Le Rochelle—This is the vessel by which the rumour at New-York of the capture of Drummond’s army, was brought—Mr: Wyer mentions it in his...
Mr Narischkin Grand Maître des Cérémonies a l’honneur d’annoncer à Madame d’Adams qu’ Elle est invitée au bal qui aura lieu chez Sa Majesté l’Impératrice Mère demain Samedi 12. du Courant à huit hures & un quart du Soir. On arrive à la Cour par le grand Perron du coté de la Neva. Le Grand Maître des Cérémonies Saisit cette Occasion avec empressement pour prier Madame d’Adams d’agréer...