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My known fondness for Agriculture and Manufactures, has given many Opportunitys, which I have often embraced, for recommending the forming Societies for their improvement; but as nothing of that kind has yet taken place among us, that I know of; I wou’d now take the liberty of proposing a Society in this Town, for improvements in Agriculture, Commerce, Arts , and Manufactures : Agriculture is...
The Bearers John Oliver and Michael Nagail are indicted of the ignominious narrow-Soul’d Crime of Sheep-stealing (at Taunton Superior Court). They depended on my going down to defend them but my Business at Boston Court prevents me. I have therefore advised them to you; they intend also to engage Colo: White with you. Their Defence principally rests on these two points which they expect to...
Boston, 18 December 1765. Printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 1:265–266 . See Notes on the Opening of the Courts 19 Dec. 1765 , and Argument before Gov. Bernard 20 Dec. 1765 , below. Printed : ( JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and...
You doubtless and every American must be Sensible, that where there is a Union happily established we Should Endeavour to Support it by all possible Means Especially when the grand Object in View is the Preservation of our Invaluable Rights and Priveledges . The Colonies (we Mean) New York and Connecticut have entered into Certain Reciprocal and Mutual Agreements Concessions and Associations,...
Yesterday I wrote you a few Lines by Docr. Tuffts informing you the Sons of Liberty Desired your Company at Boston Next Wensday and Mentioned for What Occation. I would now Desire it as a favour if you Can spare the time to Come on Monday Next Because they want you to Write those Incriptions that I mentiond to you when Last at Boston, one in favour of Liberty Not forgiting the Tru Born Sons...
11 March 1767. Enclosed in a letter from JA to Hezekiah Niles (5 Feb. 1819, LbC , Adams Papers ). Sewall’s letter was “in answer to a letter I had written to him in which I JA had enclosed a copy of the notes I had taken of Mr. Otis’s argument against writs of assistants.” MS not found. Niles neither printed nor returned the original letter of Sewall which JA sent to him. See L. H....
The Doctor talks of Setting out tomorrow for New Braintree. I did not know but that he might chance to see you, in his way there. I know from the tender affection you bear me, and our little one’s that you will rejoice to hear that we are well, our Son is much better than when you left home, and our Daughter rock’s him to Sleep, with the Song of “Come pappa come home to Brother Johnny.” Sunday...
I have very little of a political, or of any other kind of entertainment to give you. Yet I cannot omit a few lines, however small an expression they may be, sir, of my esteem and regard for you. The apprehensions of a war, the delay of Commerce, the distress of individuals, and the liberal expences of public treasure have at length ended in this—after a negociation of four months—that the...
A very laborious attention to the finishing the fifth vol of my history of England with a severe fever of five months duration the consequence of that attention has hitherto deprived me of the opportunity of answering your very polite letter of August 9. 1770. Your observations of the history of England are highly favorable and flattering to the Author but you must give me leave to say that on...
I have just returned from an agreable excursion, in the course of which I had the pleasure of receiving your favour of April last, with that of Mrs. Adams, for each of which I beg leave to return my thanks. I am sorry to find that you have deserted Boston. You plead as an excuse, sir, “the load of public and private care, which oppress’d you.” But you would have pleased me better, if instead...
Portsmouth, 13 February 1772. RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “To John Adams Esqr. at Boston favoured P Mr. Cutts”; endorsed. Whipple gives directions for litigation in the admiralty cases involving himself and Cutt. See entry for 27 Jan. , above. RC ( Adams Papers ).
Sandwich, 4 October 1772. RC ( MiU-C ); addressed to John Adams in Boston; endorsed. Freeman notifies Adams that he is appealing a case to the Superior Court and urges Adams, who has been his attorney, not to “take up against me.” Adams’ one-sentence reply that he is “ready to engage for him” is on the verso. RC ( MiU-C ).
If you have had Leisure to commit your Thoughts to writing agreable to my Request I shall be oblig’d if you will send them by the Bearer. The Govr says the House have incautiously applied a Rule of the Common Law (see the 4th Coll. of his Speech). The Assertion is mine , upon your Authority as I thought. If it be vindicable, pray give me your Aid in that as briefly as you please. I am sorry to...
The letter inclosed herewith contains My Answer to the young Gentn. you was pleased recommend Me to as an Assistant in his Study of the Law and it is in the affirmative. I have heard Nothing of our Publick Affairs since I left Boston. I have only to intreat, That, as I know you Sir can do Much to influence them Nothing be done through Strife or vain glory—and that in all cases which will...
I was very sorry to find by your favor of the 19 of Aprill that you had so many good reasons to allege for the Depriveing me thus long of the pleasure of your correspondence. We simpathise so much in mind and Body that you cannot think me guilty of compliment when I say that I was much concerned at the account you gave me of the state of your health and the situation of your public affaires....
In pursuance of a Resolution of this Society, I am to signify to you that you have this Day been duly elected a Member thereof. N.B. Subscriptions are received by frederick bull , Esq; Treasurer to this society , at his House in Leadenhall-Street, No. 96. Printed form on folded sheet approx. 13 by 8 inches ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “John Adams Esqr. Boston”; endorsed on address leaf: “Jan’y...
MS ( Adams Papers ) in the hand of Mercy (Otis) Warren. This unsigned poem was doubtless an enclosure in a letter which has since been lost. For Mrs. Warren’s relationship with the Adamses, see Adams Family Correspondence Adams Family Correspondence , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1963– . , 1:84 , note and references there. This reference is not to Gov. Hutchinson’s brother,...
Alass! How many snow banks devide thee and me and my warmest wishes to see thee will not melt one of them. I have not heard one Word from thee, or our Little ones since I left home. I did not take any cold comeing down, and find my self in better Health than I was. I wish to hear the same account from you. The Time I proposed to tarry has Elapsed. I shall soon be home sick. The Roads at...
I Received your last and am to Acknowledge that the Contents of it gave me great pleasure. I have for some time thought it necessary that the People should strike some Bold stroke and Try the Issue. They have long enough Submitted to Oppressions and Insults following one another in A rapid Succession without finding any Advantage. They have now Indeed passed the River and left no retreat and...
The Letters you sent for Mrs. Macaulay directed, under Cover, for me, were put into the Post office on Capt Scott’s arrival at Dover, and on their coming to my Hands I immediately transmitted the same to Mrs. Macaulay. You mentioned in your Letter to her, that you had sent the Proceeding of the Assemb l y relative to Certain Letters, but upon examining the Packet, they were not inclosed. I...
As the Affairs of AMERICA are now agitating in both Houses of the English Parliament, and as it would be a matter of infinite satisfaction to those subjects of the British Crown, who are natives and residents of England, Scotland, and Ireland, to know the real state of political occurrences in America, I thought it would neither be unwelcome to the English nor American public, if a news-paper...
Mr. Warren being prevented by many Avocations from writing this Morning, has put the pen into the hand of his substitute: who with him presents sincere Regards to Mr. and Mrs. Adams. Lets them know they have been Repeatedly disappointed in not seeing them at Plimouth. Shall not pretend to Deliniate the painful Ideas that arise on a survey of the Evils Brought on this much injure’d Country by...
I have this moment been enformd that You and a Number of Worthy Gentlemen, have been Honorably negatived, by Our new Governer. I most sincerely give you Joy of it, for “when impious men bear sway, the Post of Honor is a private Station.” I could have wish’d you had, at this critical Season, been one of the Honble. Council, but your Abilities, can nevertheless be of service to your Country. May...
We yesterday received your Letter directed to us, with those for Braintree, immediately on the Receipt of it, I went to Mr Cranch’s to seek a Conveyance for them but no Opportunity offered there or at the Markets. After my return to the Office, I thought it probable that we might send them from Edes and Gill’s Shop. Accordingly I run in, I very luckily met with Mr Allens Servant who promised...
Yours of the 25th. of last month never reached me, till yesterday. It would have given me great pleasure to have seen you when I returned from Salem, and I was really greatly disappointed to find you and Family gone, and more especially as I was Apprehensive I should have no Other Opportunity of seeing you, till the Time called for your Attendance at the Grand Council of America, An Assembly...
This may serve to apologize for so ungenteel a piece of Conduct as the carrying away a Sum of Money (£ 13.8—lawful) which I have received in your behalf. Nothing but absolute necessity could have forced me to do it but as I am leaving my friend you will not wonder that I wanted money which could not otherwise be procured. I have stated the matter in a letter I left for my father. RC ( Adams...
I never recd. nor heard of your letter of the 27th June last, Wrote at Ipswich until the 22d instant. Immediately on the receipt of it I set myself to consider of an answer to it. What I first remark is your great distrust of your Abilities for the service assigned you. Hereon I say that I immagine that I have Some knowledge of your Abilities, and I assure you Sir I gave My Vote for you Most...
Your Letter was this Day delivered to me in the office. Your obliging thanks for my duty gives me singular Pleasure. Mr. Hill return’d to Boston last Saturday. I very early in my Letter give you this Information because I hope it will afford you a share of consolation and happiness in proportion equal to your grief and concern you have had for his elopement. It seems his Father, as I presumed...
Nothing could induce me to keep alive the remembrance of an affair which you will easily believe I wish might be forever forgotten, but the consideration of the importance it is of to me that my Character should stand fair in the opinion of a person with whom I have had, and in all probability am likely to have, such a connection as with you; and that no suspicion of my fidelity should remain...
“We must fight , if we can’t otherwise rid ourselves of British taxation, all revenues, and the constitution or form of government enacted for us by the British parliament. It is evil against right-utterly intolerable to every man who has any idea or feeling of right or liberty. It is easy to demonstrate that the regulation act will soon annihilate every thing of value in the charter,...