You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, John

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John"
Results 1-30 of 9,690 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
AL : American Philosophical Society <On board the Boston , Port Louis, July 11, 1778: Jerome Cazneau, sergeant of marines, obtained shore leave and persuaded the other Frenchmen aboard to quit the ship. He did everything in his power to alienate them from returning to duty. The General, though under orders to assist us, gave them the choice of staying or quitting, even though he was reminded...
Je Serois bien flatté, Si j’etois le premier a Vous informer, que les Etats de la Prove. d’Utrecht ont pris hier unanimement la Resolution de concourir avec les Autres Provinces à Votre admission, comme Ministre Plenipot. du Congres des Prov. Unies de l’Amer­ ique; Je viens d’en recevoir la nouvelle de Mon frere, Membre du Tiers Etat de la dite Province: Je profite toujours de cette occasion...
I will be very flattered if I am the first to inform you that the Provincial States of Utrecht yesterday adopted unanimously the resolution concurring with the other provinces for your admission as minister plenipotentiary of the Congress of the United Provinces of America. I received this news from my brother, a member of the third estate of the said province. I take advantage of this...
Herewith we transmit you the Address of the subscribers, Democratic Republicans, of the Town and County of Washington in the State of Pennsylvania—in whose behalf / We are, Sir / your Obdt. Servts. MHi : Adams Papers.
The Students of Dickinson–College, assembled again after the usual vacation, embrace the earliest opportunity of making a public and explicit declaration of their sentiments and resolutions, at this important crisis. Believing that unanimity is of infinite importance to the Citizens of these States, and that the most unequivocal proofs of such unanimity should be now given by the Citizens at...
Please allow me to tell you how honored I am to bear your name, and how much more so I would be, had I the honor of being descended from your family. All that one reads or hears about the sublimity of your enlightenment leads one to form such wishes. How happy I would be, sir, if the similarity of our names could make you take an interest in me! I dare flatter myself that under your...
Je vous prie de me permmettre De vous temoigner combien je Suis flattè D’avoir L’honneur de porter votre nom, Et je le Serois bien davantage, si j’avois celuy D’Etre issus de votre famille tout çe qu’on lit Et ceque L’on Entend Dire de la Sublimité de vos lumieres, Est certainement bien fait pour former de pareils Desirs. Que je serois heureux, monsieur, si la Similitude de nom pouvoit vous...
I have lived to see the close of the third year of our seperation. This is a Melancholy Anniversary to me; and many tender Scenes arise in my Mind upon the recollecttion. I feel unable to sustain even the Idea, that it will be half that period e’er we meet again. Life is too short to have the dearest of its enjoyments curtaild. The Social feelings grow Callous by disuse and lose that pliancy...
I have but little news to write you. Every thing of that kind you will learn by a more accurate hand than mine; things remain much in the same situation here that they were when you went away, there has been no Desent upon the sea coast. Guards are regularily kept, and people seem more settled, and are returning to their husbandry.—I feel somewhat lonesome. Mr. Thaxter is gone home, Mr. Rice...
I received your two kind favours last Evening of march 2 d & 8 th . the seasons I belive have been very near alike both here and with you. we have had several days of warm & muggy weather, the Ground thawing the slug & miller very industerous, and as the Scripture assures us that tis Lawfull to do good upon the Sabbeth, my people are employd in Annoying these destructive Enemies, who make not...
Two days only are wanting to campleat six years since my dearest Friend first crost the Atlantick. But three months of the Six Years have been Spent in America. The airy delusive phantom Hope, how has she eluded my prospects. And my expectations of your return from month to month, have vanished “like the baseless Fabrick of a vision.” You invite me to you, you call me to follow you, the most...
It was not till last Evening that I received Your Letters of Febry 2 d 4 & 7 th . the post did not get in which was Due on twesday till Saturday. I do not know how to pass a week without hearing from You. I received newspapers to the Tenth. in those I have an account of the Declaration. it was a Solemn Scene to You, and an affecting one. You will find by my Letter of the 8 th that I was with...
The Weather has been & held so uncommonly cold ever since you left Me, that I had no expectation of getting a line from you untill you reachd N york, but that line I have not yet received, and by this Time I presume you have reachd the city of Sedition, the Hot bed of France; I wrote you this Day week, and inclosed to you our Sons Letters. Gen ll Lincoln & mrs Lincoln Dined with Me yesterday...
Mr. Cranch informs me that Hones will go to Town tomorrow, and that I may not miss one opportunity, have now taken my pen to thank you for yours by Tom, and also for that which I have just now received by Mr. Ayres. You seem in high Spirits at which you know I rejoice. Your minute description of the persons you have seen, are very entertaining to me. I cannot consent you should omit writing,...
Mr. Lorthorp call’d here this Evening and brought me yours of the 1 of October a day which will ever be rememberd by me, for it was the most distressing one I ever experienced. That morning I rose and went into my Mothers room, not apprehending her so near her Exit, went to her Bed with a cup of tea in my hand, raised her head to give it to her, she swallowed a few drops, gaspd and fell back...
Three days only did it want of a year from the date of your last Letter, when I received by Capt. Newman in the Brig Gates your welcome favour of May 22d. By various ways I had collected some little intelligence of you, but for six months past my Heart had known but little ease—not a line had reachd me from you, not a syllable from my children—and whether living or dead I could not hear. That...
our parson has been praying for you to day that you may be enabled to discharge the high and important Trust committed to you with equal integrity and abilitis as you have heretofore excercised in Negotiations at Foreign courts & embassies abroad, and with equal Benifit & satisfaction to your Country. I have been reading with attention the various addresses to the Pressident & his replies....
I received yours of Nov br. 9 th 11 th 12 & 14 th . you are made easy respecting the Election of mr Ames tho I believe that many of the Electors would not bear a strict scrutiny any more than Jarvis’s Party. I fear that in one sense evil was done, that good might come of it. there was no other way of Parrying the stroke, but making use of similar weapons and as Hudibrass has it, “to Combat...
I had just retired to my Chamber and taken up my pen to congratulate you upon the arrival of the Fleet of our Allies at Newport, when I was call’d down to receive the most agreable of presents—Letters from my dearest Friend—one Bearing date March 28 by Mr. Izard and one of May 3d, taken out of the post office, but to what port they arrived first I know not. They could not be those by the...
I think myself very happy that not a week passes but what I receive a Letter or two, some times more from you; and tho they are longer in comeing than formerly oweing I suppose to the posts being obliged to travel farther round, yet I believe they all faithfully reach me, even the curious conversation between Mr. Burn and your Honour arrived safe and made me laugh very Heartily. Your Last...
Five Weeks have past and not one line have I received. I had rather give a dollar for a letter by the post, tho the consequence should be that I Eat but one meal a day for these 3 weeks to come. Every one I see is inquiring after you and when did I hear. All my intelligance is collected from the news paper and I can only reply that I saw by that, that you arrived such a day. I know your...
Mr. Bromfield was so obliging as to write me Word that he designd a journey to the Southern States, and would take perticuliar care of a Letter to you. I rejoice in so good an opportunity of letting you know that I am well as usual, but that I have not yet got reconciled to the great distance between us. I have many melancholy Hours when the best company is urksome to me, and solitude the...
I have been highly favourd this week past. No less than 5 Letters I have received from you. It is a releif to one to know that we have a Friend who shares our misfortunes and afflictions with us. Your Letters administer comfort to my wounded Heart. It will sometimes when of of my Gaurd swell and exceed the bounds I endeavour to set to it. It is natural to mourn the loss of any comforts in...
I sit down this Evening to write you, but I hardly know what to think about your going to N.Y.—The Story has been told so many times, and with circumstances so perticuliar that I with others have given some heed to it tho my not hearing any thing of it from you leaves me at a loss. Yours of Sepbr. 4 came to hand last Night, our Worthy unkle is a constant attendant upon the Post office for me...
I do not feel easy more than two days together without writing to you. If you abound you must lay some of the fault upon yourself, who have made such sad complaints for Letters, but I really believe I have wrote more than all my Sister Delegates. Their is nothing new transpired since I wrote you last, but the sailing of some transports, and 5 deserters having come into our camp. One of them is...
With my borrowed Money I have just paid the collector my tax Bill. I have the satisfaction to know that I did not borrow it to pay any expences of my own creating, but having been twice before call’d upon, I could not submit to a third, without discharging it. I have not any Letter from you of a later date than the 17 th nor do I expect to get an other untill the 4 th of April. the weather is...
I have regularly received Your Letters and thank you for them. I have read the pamphlets. the Bone has much good natured Witt, contains many painfull facts, & Shows in a strong light what manner of Spirit actuates the pretended Patriots. the writer has in some places taken, a poetical Licence I have not offerd it where I am. Society and Interest and dissapointed ambition will have their...
Captain Beal was in Boston on Saturday and he prevaild on the post master to let him take up the Saturday Mail by which means I got those Letters which ought to have come on thursday Letters of the 11 th 12 th 13 15 & 16 th . the greatest comfort which I derived from them, was hearing that you were well. the prospect of sitting till June is not a very agreable one, and the cause less so. What...
I last Evening received your kind Letters of Jan’ry 18, 21 & 22 d accompanied with the Negotiation’s I have read the two pamphlets you sent me before. if the American pamphlet is the production of the person to whom report asscribes it, I think very little honour is due to his Head, and none to his Heart. I am sorry he is calld to fill so important an office, as the one to which he is lately...
I was very sorry to learn by your last Letters that you had little hopes of getting home till May. there are so many new Arrangments to make upon our places that I really feel unequal to the Task, but if it must be so, I will do the best I can according to my ability, and if I fail in the execution, you must at least allow for the intention. I would wish you to think what you would have done...