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The enclosed papers numbered 1. and 2. are copies 1 Of a Letter from Mr Bassett, Chairman of a Committee of the House of Representatives of the United States to me. 2 Of a Letter from Mr G. W. P. Custis to him, enclosed by him in his own Letter to me, and referred to in it. I am to request you to have the goodness to state, whether your recollection coincides with that of Mr Custis, with...
The first disciples of Jesus-Christ did not hesitate at times to ascert that the Love of Christ—the invisable yet sencible influence of redeaming love was the cause of theire preaching and writing—And if the maxim be true that that which has been may be again—I presume you will not view me as boasting when I observe that my mind has felt the influence of something this morning—that I beleaved...
It is with an inexpressible delight, that I received and perused your affectionate Letter of the first of this month after a long Silence. I cannot expect, that I Should more often receive similar favours—I Shall continue thankful, if I am permitted to See these now and then. I mentioned the name of your grand Son George, the Son of the Judge, not knowing that he was already engaged in...
On this day, one which in this part of the country is considered much as Thanksgiving day is in New England, I beg leave to express my wishes for your welfare & comfort during the cold weather which accompanies the Season in which the festival comes. It is not properly speaking a festival this Year with us as it comes on a Sunday, but the family dinner which for years past hast happened at my...
I have recd your letter of to day covering the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 23d Inst. Truly yours MHi : Adams Papers.
Your letters are always welcome, the last more than all others, it’s subject being one of the dearest to my heart. to my granddaughter your commendations cannot fail to be an object of high ambition, as a certain passport to the good opinion of the world. if she does not cultivate them with assiduity and affection, she will illy fulfill my parting injunctions. I trust she will merit a...
Your letters are always welcome, the last more than all others, it’s subject being one of the dearest to my heart. to my granddaughter your commendations cannot fail to be an object of high ambition, as a certain passport to the good opinion of the world. if she does not cultivate them with assiduity and affection she will illy fulfill my parting injunctions. I trust she will merit a...
I thank you for your kind Letter—and your Father still more for his permission in permiting you to send me a Copy of his Message, which if it had not been delay’d in Boston, would have reached me before any body else— It is every thing I could wish, or desire it to be, it cannot fail to give general, or, if not, universal satisfaction to the nation, and to all Nations—It proves so particular...
I was much delighted yesterday by the receipt of the letter from you. It assured me that you was still in good health and spirits, about which things I was a little anxious, from the time I had heard of your intention to “submit” as Mr Browere not inappropriately terms it. I had been very much incommoded I must confess, in the operation, as my hair and ears were not so easily extracted from...
In the present dearth of news, and of every thing to make a letter interesting, I am afraid I shall only be very stupid in my attempt to amuse. But since it is the day on which I am bound to write and you expect it from me, I hope this will be sufficient apology for any want of animation which you may perceive. The monotonous course of life so very secluded as the one in which I now live gives...
Believing that you Still continue to feel a deep interest in the promotion of Science through the country, & that you will take a particular pleasure in the establishment & prosperity of Scientific institutions at the Seat of the National Government I take the liberty to forward to you a copy of the circular of our Medical insti School, with a copy of the Introductory lecture delivered at its...
You will not be displeased, I am confident, if I address you again a few lines—perhaps—one or other of your family may consider it proper, to favour me at a proper period with Some information—with respect to your continued health—of which the N. papers assure us, you enjoy a considerable Share—What a blessing at Such an advanced age! My family was with me highly gratified—in Seing in these...
Time has slipped by most unaccountably during my resolutions constantly expressed of writing to you. And I can give little or no account of it. The arrival of the family safe and sound at home again was matter of so much gratification after my anxieties that I have scarcely been sufficiently composed since to do any thing. And each day has closed with the consciousness on my part of much left...
A stranger who holds your character in affectionate and reverential regard, requests you to accept a copy of An Address delivered on Groton Heights, the 6th ult. by Wm H. Brainard, Esq. of this city, in commemoration of one of the most painful, but glorious events of the war of the revolution; assured that the recorded evidences of the voluntary sacrifices, heroism and patriotic devotedness of...
Permit me Sir, to ask of you one Small favour, that is to write a few lines to the Presdent of the United States in behalf of my Son Alex Coffin junr, for the appointment of Surveyer of the Port of New York, it is understood that General Swift, who now fills that office, will Resign soon after the meeting of Congress in Decm next, And on that supposition, I make to you this application. The...
In order not to be tedious or Embarrassing to you I must be brief. I am a son of a Republican who fought and Bled in the Cause of liberty and Equality. he died in 1804 but in the Revolutionary he was so Disabled by his wounds Recd. that he had his leg amputated—he belonged to Genl. Greens Division his name was Samuel Clark. he bore a Majors Commission in the Continental army. My whole object...
You cannot Immagine the comfort your Letter of 22d Ultimo gave me I fear’d Indisposition had so far disabled you to dictate a Letter, as to leave me expossed to the contradictory accounts I now, & then had by transient visitors, who had heard from others something concerning your health; young Mr Quincy exceptd who gave me a more direct account of you, and since then thro’ Mr T P Davis who...
As the nephew of your late friend General William Whipple, who signed with you the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and who afterwards defended it, with his sword, and as the Nephew of the late Governor John Langdon, who assisted, in framing our all wise Constitution, I beg your acceptance of the Volume herewith transmitted, being the Life & Charactor of your late friend, and Patriot John...
Often when I labour in my garden,—and I do so usually from sunrise till its setting—I expatiate with you and your son in your delightful mansion. Soon everything around you shall brighten, you shall revive a while, when the president your son visits you. Indeed your last days appear to me your best days. Printed Source--Francis Adrian Van der Kemp, An Autobiography, Together with Extracts from...
After Such a long protracted Silence you will not find fault, that I indulge once more in writing you a few lines—your kindnesses, of which I received So many proofs during more than forty years—your affectionate esteem, which never was abated would be a Sufficient apology—even if I had from time to time obtained a few lines from one of your family. But the last pertinent account of the...
It is a very long time my dear venerated father since I have written to you; but the events of yesterday were altogether so interesting I cannot refrain from giving you an account of them— The genl in his travels through this Country has been so much the publick idol, and the devotion of the people has been continued with so much fervour until the last moment of his residence among us, he...
Were it not that I am well acquainted with the illustrious place you deservedly hold, in the annals of your Country; and that I know also, that your whole life; in its dawn; meridian; and (according to the limited age of man) your matured days, were devoted, and most usefully devoted, to the best interests of your Country; I should not trouble you with this letter:—I have addressed more than...
It was an unexpected pleasure which I received in your letter of the 17th. of last month, as I had not calculated upon your making such an exertion merely for me. If by writing I can do aught to amuse you a moment I shall think that I am well repaid but my vanity was not so great as to desire an answer, however gratified I may have been at receiving one. The General La Fayette is near on his...
Captain Ryk takes his leave and presents the Expression of his Veneration to His Excellency President Adams. Among all the pleasant recollections his stay in Boston never will fail to give him. certainly he allways will remember with the greatest interest that he had the honour to be introduced to the Veteran of the American liberty, ones the first Magistrate now the father of the first...
Mr. Rabello being about to visit Boston and your residence, and being very desirous of the honor of your acquaintance, I take particular satisfaction in introducing him to you as the Chargé des Affaires of the Emperor of Brazil and as a gentleman whose official and private intercourse with me has inspired me with high respect for him. I have the honor to be / with great respect / Your obedient...
As a Member of the French benevolent Society established in this City more than 20 years ago for charitable purposes, and feeling for suffering humanity and desirous to contribute my mite towards aiding their benevolent intentions I have been induced to compose a brief view of the Honor’s render’d to General LaFayette by the People of this State, and the Constituted Authorities both of the...
The past week has scarcely been marked by any occurrence worth relating in a letter, the weather after having been intensely warm on Sunday and Monday cooled off and we have had an Easterly storm ever since. This makes me quite dull as I prefer the Sun with all his fires. General La Fayette after having thrust his benign countenance among us; has gone to other places to make them happy for a...
As doubts have been expressed by the Agent of His Britannic Majesty under the 6th and 7th articles of the Treaty of Ghent as to the position of the Long Lake mentioned in the Treaty of 1783, I have the honor to solicit any information you can give to identify that Lake, and would beg leave to submit the following questions: Upon what map did the Commissioners trace the Boundary Line described...
Immediately after the late celebration on Bunker-Hill the enclosed lines were written, and have since appeared in some of our news-papers, As they contain an allusion to some of the revolutionary Sages to whom this country is under lasting obligations. I hope you will at least esteem them as a testimony of my veneration for you. I am, / Most respectfully / Your Obt sert. MHi : Adams Papers.
One week has passed already since my arrival here and to us by no means a quiet one. General La Fayette arrived two days after me and has since engrossed almost all our attention. Dinner has succeeded to dinner and party to party, although the weather has been warm constantly. We now enjoy a few days of quiet as my Father and John have accompanied the General and suite and will not return for...