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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Adams, John
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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Your last Letter my Dear John was indeed filled with grievous news and I sincerely pity the afflicted family who are left in a situation so melancholy—The shock must no doubt have been severe to your Grandfather although it was expected; but the strongest minds insensibly repel the idea of death until the inevitable doom is sealed, and we cannot fly from conviction by its sad and solemn...
I was very much hurt at the tone of your Letter yesterday my Dear John which could only be accounted for by the sourness and irritation which the late unpleasant events at Cambridge have produced upon your feelings and general character—You are too susceptible and misconceive the meaning of even your best friends still worse of a Mother who has ever shewn you the utmost kindness and...
As I feel very much concerned for your dissmission from College my Dear John lest you should have some debts that may embarrass you I beg you me immediately that I may find some plan if possible to extricate you from your most pressing difficulties without disguising in the least the real state of things—My means are very small but perhaps I may find some medium which may enable me to settle...
Your Letters my Dear John gave us great uneasiness on account of your Grandfathers health and for your own situation which is painful to an extreme—But it is vain to repine at that which cannot be changed or to suffer evil to absorb all our attention—The only remedy that is now to be offered is an unwearied application to acquire reputation and renown in your profession and by this means wash...
From Letters received from Edward Taylor and Charles, I at length understand that the unpleasant occurrence which has taken place at Cambridge has again proved one of those in which the Esprit de Corps has made it necessary for you to take your part and to act with your Class—I grieve most sincerely at this necessity which ultimately must be very injurious to you and probably lose you your...
What shall I say to you my Dear John? or how shall I refrain from reproaching you? I will not judge you because I cannot yet understand what the difficulty is which occasioned your fault for a fault it is and a grave one however you or your Class may colour it—You were fully aware of how much you would lose and perfectly understood how much your father always is affected by this sort of...
I should certainly have answered your last very kind Letter immediately, had I not been very suddenly siezed by a violent Fever which confined me to my bed, and so entirely prostrated me in a few hours as to render all exertion impossible. Blistering and bleeding have at length subdued the disease, and I am now about the house again, although far from well, and sieze the moment of recovery to...
I have been very sick confined to my bed for several days therefore not able to write to either of you as I have intended as I have this day left my bed I send you at least a few lines in answer to both your Letters received within two days and to express if possible the gratification which the proper and affectionate feelings they manifested to your brother occasioned both to your father and...
I have not written to you for some time my Dear Sir because I had nothing but bad news to tell but being all once more in the mending way I hasten to assure you that Georges arm is doing as well as we can hope and that the recovery is as rapid as the injury received will permit although he must bear up against a very tedious confinement—Although his fever ran high for the first four days his...
You will no doubt have been fretting again at my unusual silence but it has been occassioned by a very unfortunate accident which befel your brother on his return from Rockville where he had been to visit Johnson—He was thrown from his Horse and fractured his right just in the elbow joint which is likely to disable him for many months—Your father and myself went immediately to Montgomery where...