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Since my last I have waited with Impatience to hear from you. I mean Individually. The public Expectation to hear from the Congress is great. They dont Complain but they wonder that the Congress should set a month without their receiveing something decisive with regard to us. I presume we shall have it in due time, at least that nothing will be wanting in your power to relieve the distresses...
John Adams Esqr. B ough t of J. Young Junr. 1775 June 14. To a new Pad and Double raind Curb Bridle £  14 6 15. Mendg. an old Bridle 1 July 3. To a Cover for sword Scabboard 3 14. To a small pad for housings 2
I set down to write to you a monday, but really could not compose myself sufficently: the anxiety I sufferd from not hearing one syllable from you for more than five weeks; and the new distress ariseing from the arrival of recruits agitated me more than I have been since the never to be forgotten 14 of April. I have been much revived by receiving two letters from you last Night, one by the...
The Day; perhaps the decisive Day is come on which the fate of America depends. My bursting Heart must find vent at my pen. I have just heard that our dear Friend Dr. Warren is no more but fell gloriously fighting for his Country—saying better to die honourably in the field than ignominiously hang upon the Gallows. Great is our Loss. He has distinguished himself in every engagement, by his...
I thank you for your Several favors, the last of which, the 10th Inst., I just now received. I have not had time to write, and thro’ abundant business my health has Sometimes been reduced; I now write in Committee of Safety, a few lines at a time as I can; all the business in this Committee has been done by only 6 or 7 Members, upon whom it has fallen very heavy, public business having pressed...
Since my last I have the pleasure of Several of yours. I am Extreamly obliged to you, and to continue your Attention to me in this way can assure you I dont fail to make use of anything I think will serve the publick from your Letters. I Communicated to both our Generals that Paragraph of your Letter Containing Genll. Lees Opinion of the Generals and character perticularly of Burgoine. Yours...
I Received the Letters, with which you were pleased to favor me per Mr. Fessenden on Saturday last being the 18th Instant, at a Critical Time for the Army posted at Cambridge. The Evening preceeding Orders were Issued in Consequence of a Consultation between the General Officers and Committee of Safety to take possession of Dorchester Hill and Bunkers hill in Charlestown which I must confess...
I received your favor of May 29 by Messrs. Halls. I was much concerned that I had it not in my power to treat those young Gentlemen with as much respect as their characters and your recommendation entitled them to. When your Letter was deliver’d me, which was but a few days ago, we were all in the utmost hurry, packing up the Library and Apparatus, for their removal to a distance in the...
I received yours of june 10, for which I thank you. I want you to be more perticuliar. Does every Member feel for us? Can they realize what we suffer? And can they believe with what patience and fortitude we endure the conflict—nor do we even tremble at the frowns of power.—You inquire of me, who were at the engagement at Grape Island. I may say with truth all Weymouth Braintree Hingham who...
John Adams Esqr. To John Stille Dr. 1775 June 24th.  To makeing Suit of Nankeen 0: 6: 0  3 3/4 Y ard s of Linnen @ 3/6 0: 13: 1 1/2  Buttons 0: 2: 7  Thread 1/6 Silk 3/ hair 2/ Buckram /3 Staying 1/6 0:
Long before this will reach you, you will have an Account of the Action, att Charlestown, in which though the regulars have gaind an Advantageous Cituation have paid for itt very dearly, which loss in Millitary Accheivements is lookt upon as trivial. The distruction of Charlestown is a most Melancholy seen, as Three quarters of the Inhabitants have lost there, all. Brother Kent house, W....
My Father has been more affected with the distruction of Charlstown, than with any thing which has heretofore taken place. Why should not his countanance be sad when the city, the place of his Fathers Sepulchers lieth waste, and the gates thereof are consumed with fire, scarcly one stone remaineth upon an other. But in the midst of sorrow we have abundant cause of thankfulness that so few of...
You will doubtless before the Receipt of this have heard of the bloody Engagement at Charlestown. For a particular Account of it I must refer You to a Letter I last Week wrote our Friend Collins. The ministerial Troops gain’d the Hill but were victorious Losers. A few more such Victories and they are undone. I cannot think our Retreat an unfortunate one. Such is the Situation of that Hill that...
I feel great reluctance in suffering any Opportunity to pass without writeing to you. I can easily suppose your Anxiety as well as Curiosity make you sollicitous to hear every thing that passes here. Since my last nothing material has taken place. The military Operations have Consisted in a few movements and a few Shot Exchanged with very little Effect, sometimes on the side of Roxbury, and...
1775 £ s d June 28 To hay for two Horses 3/ Oats 2/ 5: 29 To Ditto to July 2d. 3 days hay 9/ Oats 9/ 18: July 2 To hay 3/ Oats 1/4 4: 4 3 To ditto 3/ Oats 1/4 4: 4
One of the many brave and gallant Actions that have graced our Arms, I take the Liberty of writing you an Account of. The most important Transactions, since your Abscence, you are undoubtedly already informed of; but as this, I am about to relate, is just come to hand, I embrace the Opportunity of sending you an Account of it by the Express. Not long before the Date of this, General Gage...
I am Now Acompanyg Genl. Washington and Lee from Springfield to the Camp—having been appointed by Congress with Doctr. Church to proceed to Springfield and Acompany them to the Camp aforesaid. We Meet them at Spring, lodged last Night at Brookfield and are now under the Escort of the Troop of Horse which is to Continue till we arive at Worcester—where we are to be received by an Other Troop...
You have no Doubt long before this heard of the unhappy Fate of Charlestown, its Destruction by Fire, the forcing of our Entrenchments there by the ministerial Troops and the Loss of our valuable Friend Doct. Warren who was shot through the Breast and soon expir’d. The Entrenchments were unfinishd the work of but one Night. However, they were gallantly defended and by all Accounts, there was...
I have received a good deal of paper from you; I wish it had been more coverd; the writing is very scant but I must not grumble. I know your time is not yours, nor mine. Your Labours must be great, and your mouth closed, but all you may communicate I beg you would. There is a pleasure I know not whence it arises nor can I stop now to find it out, but I say there is a degree of pleasure in...
I have had the pleasure of seeing several of your Letters in which you Complain that your friends are Rather remiss With Regard to writing you which I think inexcusable at a time when the Liberties of all America and the fate of the British Empire Depend, in a Great Measure on the Result of your Deliberating for if that Respectable Body of which you are a Member, fails, (Either from want of...
I received your very kind Letter last Evening and this Morning had the Honour of being introduc’d to Genl. Washington by Majr. Mifflin, and through Your Reccommendation was very genteely notic’d. I had an Invitation from the General to dine with him tomorrow, when I shall attempt making a proper Use of your Hints. I have been intirely idle ever since the Communication with the Town of Boston...
I received yours of the 20th June, and am very much obliged to you, for your Kindness in mentioning my Name to General Washington. I have since waited on his Excellency and find him answer the high Character we conceived of him. General Lee has treated me with great politeness. We are very much pleased with the continental Congress having adopted and organized the Army. There never was greater...
I am much Obliged to you for your favours by the Sage, Brave, and Amiable General Washington, by Major Mifflin, and by the Express, which came to hand the Night before last. I am much pleased with General Washington. He fully Answers the Character you have given of him. Major Mifflin I have not yet found out, tho’ I am told he was once in the Room while I was at the Generals. I shall take...
Every line from you gives me much satisfaction, my Heart Sympathizes with you in your present distress. I cannot write so fully as I could Wish, may Heaven Bless, Protect, and Prosper you, I have sent you a few things per Capt. Falkner hope they will arrive safe and prove acceptable, adieu my Dear Sir. Yours affectionately The small Parcel by the Paul, Capt. Gordon which you say is not come to...
Your amiable Lady tells me, you have often complained of your Friends not writing to you. I should have wrote to you, but was unwilling to be troublesome; for I concluded, your Head, your Heart, and your Hands must be so full, so anxious, and incessantly laboring to save your Country, that a Letter, even from a Friend, would be rather a Burthen than a Pleasure; and this Sentiment (I doubt not)...
I wrote you several days ago, and wrote in a hurry, Expecting the Generals Express would be along before I could finish, but he has been detained, and am told will be on his Journey this Morning. I was much Chagrined Last Evening when setting under a Tree by the Bridge Fessenden rode up from Philadelphia without a Single Letter for me. He says you Complain that you have no Letters. I have...
I have met with some abuse and very Ill treatment. I want you for my protector and justifier. In this Day of distress for our Boston Friends when every one does what in them lyes to serve them, your Friend Gorge Trott and family moved up to Braintree, went in with her two Brothers and families with her Father, but they not thinking themselves so secure as further in the Country moved away....
I have, since I have had the Happiness to see you become a Son of Mars. Should have done myself the Pleasure of writing before this had not I thought your Time was spent in more importance than in reading my Letters. Have been very much tyed since I Entered the Army. Mrs. Adams informs me you complain of the Remissness of your former Correspondence; wish Sir it was in my Power to make up their...
I have this afternoon had the pleasure of receiving your Letter by your Friends Mr. Collins and Kaighn and an English Gentle man his Name I do not remember. It was next to seeing my dearest Friend. Mr. Collins could tell me more perticuliarly about you and your Health than I have been able to hear since you left me. I rejoice in his account of your better Health, and of your spirits, tho he...
I am much oblig’d by your Letter of 6th. Instant and will now attempt in Part to comply with your Request. Things have remaind tolerably quiet between the continental and ministerial Camps for a Week past. The Beginning of last Week a Detachment was sent in the Night to take all the live Stock that was on Long Island. They succeeded and brought away not only all the Quadrupeds but 17 Fellows...
I yesterday returned from Plymouth where I had opportunity of spending only three or four days in such a hurry of private Business as would scarcely admit of a single Meditation in the Calm retirements of the Fields. I Breakfasted in the Morning with your Sensible and Amiable Lady. She showed me a Letter from you. I read it with pleasure. I arrived here about 12 O Clock. You will say a late...
Sister Adams informs me that you complain that your Friends this way neglect writing to you. I believe a share of the Blame belongs to me, and shall now endeavour to make some amends. We have lately had several little Expeditions from this quarter against the Enemy, a particular account of which, as near as I can collect it from those who were present, I shall give you.—On the 11th. Inst. in...
I am this far arrived on my way Home. Give Me Leave to introduce to your Notice Mr. George Lux a Son of a Gentleman who is my particular Friend, a Man of the most worthy and amiable Character, he is bound for our Camp and would be glad to carry your Commands to any of your Friends. Mr. Cary, Mr. Hopkins and Smith, young Gentlemen of Balt. Town, are also for our Camp and worthy of Attention. I...
I received yours of July 7 for which I heartily thank you, it was the longest and best Letter I have had, the most Leasurely and therefore the most Sentimental. Previous to your last I had wrote you and made some complaints of you, but I will take them all back again—only continue your obliging favours whenever your time will allow you to devote one moment to your absent Portia. This is the 25...
Since my last to you, nothing very important has occurd. The Skirmish near Long Island, You have already received an Accountt off by Mrs. Adams. A Party of Soldiers were employd last Week in removing Grain from Nantasket and having got off what was ripe, on Thursday they went in Whaleboats to the Light House, set Fire to it having first taken off the Lamps, 3 or 4 bbs. of oil and 1/2 bb....
Watertown, 25 July 1775. FC ( M-Ar : Mass. House of Representatives Records, 57:263). As speaker, James Warren notified JA and the other members of the delegation of their election to the Council and expressed the wish that they would take their seats on the Council as soon as their duties in the congress permitted. Their election to the Council had taken place on 21 July. JA took his seat on...
I forgot in my last epistle, to desire you to speak to the Phila. printer’s of the News paper’s generally sent this way for to send me One, weekly which as the posts are now regulated, comes here a Thursday Afternoon, the Hartford post arriving att Cambridge a Wednesday Night. Your two Peices Issue’d by your Congress meets with general Applause—but we want to see that to the King and as itt is...
I do not feel easy more than two days together without writing to you. If you abound you must lay some of the fault upon yourself, who have made such sad complaints for Letters, but I really believe I have wrote more than all my Sister Delegates. Their is nothing new transpired since I wrote you last, but the sailing of some transports, and 5 deserters having come into our camp. One of them is...
I have this Minute your Favour of 23d. July. We have had, Saturday Night and last Night much skirmishing between the ministerial and continental Troops. The Regulars attempted entrenching on Charlestown Neck Saturday Night, which produc’d a Brush Sunday Morning. They were obliged to desist by the Fire of our ranging Parties. It is said they lost seven and we two Men. There has been a...
I had the pleasure of your favours of the 23d. Instant Yesterday. I am glad to find that you have appointed Thomas the first Brigadier this I think will satisfy both him and the Army. I have been Obliged to take pains to keep him in the Camp, he seldom talks Imprudently, and I believe has never done it on this Occasion. Spencer is a Man I have no knowledge of. He left the Camp on the first...
You was inquiring the other Day into the Office of Judge Advocate. I will now acquaint you with some Particulars in that Department which will give you an Idea of that Officer’s Duty in the Continental Army. As Judge Advocate, I have his Excellency’s (the Commander in chief) Orders, in writing, “to attend every General Court Martial, not only those of the Line but of each Brigade throughout...
Mr. John Adams  Dr.  To Mrs. Yard. 1775 Augt. 1st. To your Board & Lodging from the 10th May to this day 11 1/2 Wks.à 30s. per Wk. £17: 5 To your Servants Board for 7 Wks. 4 days à 15s. 5: 12: 6 To your Proportion to the Parlour and Candles 11 1/2 Wks. à 4s. 2: 6 To your proportion of the Liquor 13: 10 £38: 13: 6 38
To your request that I would give you my sentiments on the important subject of your Commission which so much interests the defence of these Colonies I answer. Of all pursuits that men have yet engaged in none is more subject to misfortune, imposition, and disappointment than that of minerals. Few are, or from the mysterious and complex nature of the thing can be judges of the matter. Few have...
I have very Accidentally heard of this Opportunity by Mr. Brown and have so short Notice of it that I can do little more than Acknowledge the Receipt of your favour of the 26th. July, which I Received the day before Yesterday when my Mind was tortured with Anxiety and distress. The Arrival of powder in this manner is certainly as Wonderful an Interposition of Providence in our favour as used...
Tis with a sad Heart I take my pen to write to you because I must be the bearer of what will greatly afflict and distress you. Yet I wish you to be prepaired for the Event. Your Brother Elihu lies very dangerously sick with a Dysentery. He has been very bad for more than a week, his life is despaired of. Er’e I close this Letter I fear I shall write you that he is no more. We are all in great...
The Honble. John Adams Esqr. to Saml. Cook Dr. 1775 Augst. 24th. To Boarding your Lady & Self 3 days £0: 12: To 3 days Keeping yr. Horse 3: £0: 15: The Honble. John Adams to Samll. Cooke junr. Dr. To boardg: 6 days @ 2/ £0: 12. 0 To breakfasting & dining 4 persons @ 9/ 3. To keeping your horse 4 nights @ 1/
I have taken leave to Send you Enclos’d herewith, a brief account of the Several Stations in which I have Serv’d my Country in a Military way—as a history of all occurrences and Personal Sufferings in that Service would have been too tedious for your Patience, I presum’d not to trouble you with it. Therefore Shall say no more here than that, any Notice you Shall please to take of me on your...
In 1745 He was an Ensign of a Company in Colo. Robert Hales Regiment at the Reduction of Louisbourg. In 1746, He was made a Lieutenant in Major Moses Titcombs Company in Brigr. General Waldo’s Regiment, design’d to Serve in an Expedition against Canada under the Command of General St. Clare Saint-Clair —but as the Expedition hung in Suspence, It was propos’d by the Government of...
I have this minit received the Inclosed account and Imbrace the oppertunity of Conveying it to you by Mr. Pain. I am Sir your most obediant Huml Sert., NB: I find my Brother has not Been so perticuler as I Could have wished—he has not Given any account of his former Campain—he was an officer at the reduction of the Newtrel frinch at Noviscotia in the last war about two years. RC ( Adams Papers...
I have received a Line from my Brother which informs me of your desire of a particular Account of the Action at Charlestown. It is not in my Power at present to give so minute an Account as I should choose being ordered to decamp and march to another Station. On the 16 June in the Evening I received Orders to march to Breeds Hill in Charlestown with a party of about one thousand Men consisting...