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    • Ward, Joseph
  • Recipient

    • Adams, John
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Ward, Joseph" AND Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I have been long waiting for an opportunity to communicate some intelligence worthy of your notice, but nothing very important has taken place since you left the Camp; and every action with the Enemy has been published in the Newspapers, which has superseded the necessity of communicating those events by Letter. The general face of our public affairs both civil and military appear much as they...
I beg leave to recommend to your Notice Capt. Price, the Bearer of this, who has commanded one of the Companies of Riflemen in this Encampment; he has supported the Character of a good Officer and a worthy Gentleman; any Services which you may have opportunity to render him, will I apprehend, be serving our Country. We have received an account from Halifax, that great disturbances have lately...
I had the honour some time since to receive your Favour of the 14 Ultimo which I am now to acknowledge. The Enemy have not made any important movements for a considerable time. Last week Genl. Howe sent 300 of the poor inhabitants of Boston to be landed near Point Shirley, which was such a distance from any Houses where they might receive entertainment and many of them being in very poor...
We hoped to have the pleasure of seeing you again in Camp before you set out for Philadelphia, but as you don’t like a “sleepy Camp” I can easily account for your preferring the Senate. The time perhaps is not far distant when the Camp will be wakeful and active—and to leave us without excuse, I wish we may have a sufficient quantity of the Needful . The Regiments of Militia which were ordered...
The 2 instant at night we began a cannonade and bombardment upon the Enemy, and continued it three nights successively; on the 4th at night we threw up works upon the heights on Dorchester Point. The next morning the Pirates in Boston and in the Harbour appeared to be in great agitation, and every day and night since have been preparing (according to our observations, and the information from...
The 17th Instant the Pirates all abandoned their Works in Boston and Charlestown and went on board their Ships, and on the 20th they burnt and destroyed the works on Castle Island. They now lye in Nantasket Road waiting for a fair wind; we keep a vigilant eye over them lest they should make an attack on some unexpected quarter. The particulars with regard to the Seige, the Stores taken, &c....
As the Ships of War now building in this and other Colonies for the Continental Service, will want Commanders, who will I conclude be appointed by Congress, I beg leave to mention to you a Capt. Fellows, late of Boston, who was bred to the Sea and is recommended as a very good Man for a Commander, and I have been desired to mention him to you. He appears to me to be a Man of activity and...
I have the honour of your Favour of the sixteenth of April. You observe, Sir, very justly, that every motive of self preservation, of honor, profit, and glory, call upon us to fortify this Harbour so as to be impregnable; and I hope we shall hear and obey . There has been a great clamour among many people against the Troops here because they did not go on faster with the Works, but you may be...
I have the pleasure to inform you that we have driven the Pirates out of this Harbour. The thirteenth instant at evening a detachment of five hundred men, with several pieces of battering Cannon and a thirteen inch Mortar, under the command of Col Whitcomb was ordered to take post on Long Island and throw up works, the next morning they began a fire upon the Enemy’s Ships from the Cannon and...
I have the pleasure to inform you that another Scotch Transport with a Company of Highland Grenadiers on board was brought into this Port by the Privateers on the eighteenth Instant. Each Transport brings a quantity of provisions and camp equipage for the Troops. We have now about four hundred and fifty Highlanders prisoners; they are going into the Country Towns agreeable to the Order of...