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By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
You will forgive my having so long delay’d to reply to your very kind letter of January 1st., when you know that I have waited until I could write with certainty: and I did not feel that I could do this, until I knew the decision of the house of Representatives on the agreement made with me by the President:—the passing of the Appropriation bill by that house, including a Sum on account of...
The undersigned a Committee of Arrangements for a dinner to be given on the fourth of March next, in honor of the election of James Monroe Esqr. to the Presidency of the United States, beg leave to wait on your Excellency— With the day approaching are associated recollections most dear to the heart of the patriot; recollections which bring to our view, what this Country once was, the hours of...
My son was particularly gratified with your account of Governor Pownal. His Impressions towards his Character from reading his Work on the Administration of the colonies, were favourable, though vague. He remarked to me, strongly, how valuable your Letters were, as in this Instance you had given several facts which probably no other Person now living was acquainted with, and which at some...
What a gratification again have you bestowed upon me in your Letter of Febr. 7th. not never to mention ing the cadeau of which I disposed directly with the next mail, as you intended—and which Shall I doubt not, be highly acceptable to Monticello’s Philosopher. It Seems—I see you in all your grandeur in your Superb castle—and yet the most admirable part was its owner—I Should Saÿ so, as once...
I fear you must have thought me inattentive to your request that I would ascertain the requisitions for admission into the Sophomore and Junior Classes at Harvard University;—I immediately procured a copy of the College Laws, expecting to find the course of Studies prescribed in them but was disappointed; I then applied to Mr A. Norton and Prof. Ware on the subject, and from the former...
An attack of rhumatism which has confined me to my room & kept me in such a feverish, irritable state as to be almost incapable of any thing, has alone prevented my writing to return my thanks for the few hints on the subject of the Jesuits; I hope Sir, you will be willing to continue the subject which has long appeared to me one of the most interesting in modern history. The peice you sent...
I am certainly very glad, Sir, that the Baron de Grimm with his 16 big tomes has been able to amuse You for a few hours, and So far at least one feels disposed to forgive him his philosophy, though upon the whole it may be senseless and unprofitable enough.—Indeed, I readily beleive, that You will also forgive him a few weak paragraphs about his holy Church philosophir, since he has indited so...
Your letter of the 1st. of this Month was received by me here on the 6th. I will not attempt to express to you the feelings which were excited in my mind by its kind & approving Language—to have the approbation of the first benefactor & most eminent patriot of my Country gratifies my proudest ambition. You also will be gratified to learn that in this instance Our Country has departed from...
Although I continue to be an invalide by a relapse Since three weeks—I will endeavour to amuse myself—while I have once more a prospect of recovering Soon—in perusing again and answering your affectionate lines of the 27 of Dec. last. you will not deem it a triffle for a man—who know not Sickness as by name, to be confined to his chair—during three months—often under torturing pains—But—it...
I send, by this Mail, Nos. 7, 8, & 9, of my Magazine, & invite thy particular attention to the Essay of Franklin , on a National School, &c. Please favor me with thy opinion of it, & of the plans that he suggests. The little Work I mentioned sometime ago, is printed, at Boston, & I have directed my publisher to send thee a Copy. It is anonymous, because I must conceal the of Authorship. I hope...
The reproof I received in your Letter of the 11th. & which I was favoured with only last Evening would have been more keenly felt if I had not written you one in the Morning. And now once more permit me to beg your Indulgence untill I can be relived from the daily Toil I am subjected to by the Duties I owe to the S. J. Court which now sits both forenoon & afternoon six Days in the week, & will...
The animated Style in which you have described the circumstances attending the Trial of Corbet & his comrades & the unfair Manner in which You were treated by the strange Species of Judges which made up the Vice Admiralty Court leads me to urge You to explain the Secret of Hutchinson’s Conduct in this multitudinous Divan; (for such the Court became by their repeated Adjournments to the Council...
As you live in terror of my long Letters, and as the very last, I had the pleasure of writing you, was of that description, and not without a smack of orthodoxy, I shall content myself this time with a very few lines, to accompany the Sunday’s Observer and Saturday’s cheap Cobbett; for the Porpuicine to shoot his Quills with more effect has made himself cheap, and although you will know what...
Forty three volumes read in one year, and 12. of them quartos! dear Sir, how I envy you! half a dozen 8vos. in that space of time are as much as I am allowed. I can read by candlelight only, and stealing long hours from my rest; nor would that time be allowed me indulged to me, could I, by that light, see to write from sun-rise to one or two oclock, and often from dinner to dark, I am drudging...
Forty three volumes read in one year, and 12. of them quartos! dear Sir, how I envy you! half a dozen 8 vos in that space of time are as much as I am allowed. I can read by candlelight only, and stealing long hours from my rest; nor would that time be allowed me indulged to me, could I, by that light, see to write. from sun-rise to one or two aclock, and often from dinner to dark, I am...
The winter is always the busy season here. With me, it is especially so from the fortnight that precedes the session of the supreme court, until its close. Therefore, before the arrival of that time, I must, while I can, have the pleasure of writing to you. It is chiefly that I may thank you for one or two of your late favors. That from “Montezillo”, written on Christmas day, I have...
Your favour of 23. Septr: & 3. Octr. was brought to me by my old friend and Classmate I. M. Forbes, and that of 13. Novr. by General Boyd, who both came fellow-passengers in the same vessel. Mr Everett has since arrived, by whom I received a Letter of 26. November, from my dear Mother. I have briefly replied to my Mother upon the advice, which you and she have given me to return to the United...
You know my vanity and therefore are probably surprized that I have not before this transmitted you a journal of my travels; now do not condemn me too soon nor at any rate too severely but let it mitigate my sentence to recollect that Mrs. Adams herself invited this freedom and that I avail myself of the honor and kindness of that permission. I shall always consider myself, my dear Sir, under...
Twenty Eight years ago, I had the honor of painting in London your portrait in my picture of the Declaration of Independance,—the long succeeding period of War and Calamity palsied and suspended thy progress in the work of which that picture was a most important part. Peace is at length restored; I have resumed my task; that Picture is finished; Trenton, Princeton & York Town are far advanced;...
We have the Honor of your Excellency’s Letter of the 16th. Instant wherein You inform us that you have received Authority from the Secretary of State of the United States to adjust and settle our Accounts for Services authorized by the late Genl. Lyman on the public Account of the United States. We beg to make our best acknowledgments for the Trouble and Interest your Excellency has taken in...
As editor of the Weekly Register (a work that I am flattered with a belief has effected a good deal, of his building up a national character for his country, of which you may have heard) I have been loudly called upon to collect & preserve in an extra volume, a body of the speeches, & neglected or almost forgotten public papers of the times of the revolution—to give to an admiring posterity...
ἀναπέτομαι δὴ πρὸσ ολυμπον πτερυγεσσι κούφαις — μ’ ἐπίβωτον κατὰ γειτόνας ποιήσεις. And I was gratified by your condescending kindness—as to this I was chiefly indebted to that distinction, with which I was honored in your state—and even here—but with what pleasure I have accepted these favours, may you conclude from—hence—that—ornandus et tollendus sum—where and whenever you find it...
Was I to draw the Portraits of the two Characters You mention, of the first I should say that he was not a Man of military Genius, but of consummate Discretion. He could rise on Misfortune in an extraordinary Manner & thus obtained the Confidence of his motley Army. But he committed several gross Blunders. The first was at Long Island in 1776. After our the Battle in which we were defeated by...
From your suggestions, I have attempted and publish’d an Analysis of the Will of Mr Boylston, which its probable you have seen; but how far I have succeeded in meeting your expectations, (that is, as far as I have gone into it—) you can best determine—any hint or amendment from you on the subject, I shall be greatly obliged to you for As your opinions have the force of a Commandment I averr’d...
Mr Cobbett whose political opinions, as you know have undergone some changes since he was battling it in favour of the British Government in Philadelphia, has become the great champion of Parliamentary reform; and in order to increase the number of his readers among the labouring classes of the People, he has lately had recourse to the expedient of reprinting particular numbers of his weekly...
If I don’t reply immediately to your kind Letters, pray attribute it to my being an Inquirer, & have little to communicate in Return; besides I have furnished You with so much Matter to discuss & explain that I have some fears of becoming oppressive. Your last very confidential Letter makes me eager to obtain more of them. When I sported the Character of Hutchinson, I started a Subject which I...
I recieve here, dear Sir, your favor of the 4th. just as I am preparing my return to Monticello for winter quarters; and I hasten to answer to some of your enquiries. the Tracy I mentioned to you is the one connected by marriage with La Fayette’s family. the mail which brought your letter brought one also from him. he writes me that he is become blind & so infirm that he is no longer able to...
I recieve here, dear Sir, your favor of the 4 th just as I am preparing my return to Monticello for winter quarters; and I hasten to answer to some of your enquiries. the Tracy I mentioned to you is the one connected by marriage with La Fayette ’s family. the mail which brought your letter brought one also from him . he writes me that he is become blind & so infirm that he is no longer able to...
In thanking you for your last ing interesting Letter, I have been particularly gratified, in finding you roused to those Recollections which may amuse whilst they recall the Circumstances of that interesting Period which produced those persevering Energies that terminated in the Liberation of our Country. You have given me a Text Book, which others may hereafter descant upon, if Hutchinson’s...
You have seen so much, read so much, and thought so much, of publick affairs under all aspects; you know so well what is becoming in national dignity and spirit, and what is due also to policy and seemliness, that I declare, according as your ripe judgment may disapprove or sanction the enclosed paper, will I either put it by, or lay it before those who have the power, if they think fit, to...
From your Letter of the 7th. I find some Misconception has arisen between you & the Editor of the N.A. Review. Your note of the 5th. I handed to that gentleman, & told him how fully I agreed with you in the Sentiment that the Hutchinsonian Controversy & the Impeachment of the Judges, if not the Pivots upon which the Revolution turned they certainly urged on & hastened, those Measures which...
I mentioned in a former letter, that Monticello’s Philosopher, desired in one of his Letters, that I might undertake, to write the life of J. C. and that I would endeavor to chalk out its outlines—which I would Submit to your considerations. Having hurted my leg through carelessnes—working in my garden, and rendered by further neglect—So painful, that I have been doomed to my cottage, during a...
My Father has communicated to me your letter of yesterday, which he means to answer particularly himself, but in the mean time, I do not wish to lose a moment in assuring you of the gratification I shall feel in being instrumental in communicating to the publick any observations from you on the points you have mentioned. The illustration of American history is with me a very favorite object,...
In further answer to your favor of the 20th of last month, I beg leave to say, that I have just returned from the visit I talked of making to Philadelphia. I find it to be as decidedly the opinion of my mother and brothers, as I confess it was my own, that my fathers letters should not be given up for the press. If, therefore, you should write to Doctor Mease, may we venture to ask it of your...
I have acknowledged the receipt of your seven Letters, dated in July, and August, received by Mr Thacher and Mr Bigelow and also of one dated in May, but very lately delivered by Mr Brooks. It is more than time for me to reply to their contents. I never had much relish for the speculations of the first philosophy. In that respect I resemble your Eels in Vinegar, and your mites in cheese, more...
I am not conscious that I have been deficient in a return to all the Letters you have written to me, and I now acknowledge your last, july 31st you have had a long vacation—I hope it has not all been Spent in amusement, and dissipation—you knew I used to wish you back to your School; when the vacation was only a fortnight. you sometimes used to think hard of it. you will not think so, when you...
Your letter; dear Sir, of May 6. had already well explained the Uses of grief, that of Sep. 3. with equal truth adduces instances of it’s abuse; and when we put into the same scale these abuses, with the afflictions of soul which even the Uses of grief cost us, we may consider it’s value in the economy of the human being, as equivocal at least. those afflictions cloud too great a portion of...
Your letter, dear Sir, of May 6. had already well explained the Uses of grief, that of Sep. 3. with equal truth adduces instances of it’s abuse; and when we put into the same scale these abuses, with the afflictions of soul which even the Uses of grief cost us, we may consider it’s value in the economy of the human being, as equivocal at least. those afflictions cloud too great a portion of...
Your favor of the 4th. of Sepr. was handed to me, by Docr. Freeman, at my abode in Virga. just before I left it for this place. His transient stay afforded but a slight opportunity for the civilities I wished to shew to one who enjoys so much of your esteem, and who appeared so well to deserve them. He was so good as to call at the door since my arrival here; but being at the moment engaged,...
I am still not only to answer, but to acknowledge the receipt of your kind Letters of 3. 10. 18. 24. and 26. July; and 4. August—all of which I had the pleasure of receiving at once by Messrs Thacher and Bigelow, who came fellow Passengers in the same vessel Mr Bigelow has been out here and dined with us—His father, the Speaker, was one year before me, at the University, where I had a...
Your favor of the 4th. of Sepr. was handed to me, by Docr. Freeman, at my abode in Virga. just before I left it for this place. His transient stay afforded but a slight opportunity for the civilities I wished to shew to one who enjoys so much of your esteem, and who appeared so well to deserve them. He was so good as to call at the door since my arrival here; but being at the moment engaged,...
I Should rather guess that Basanistes would do good—It is true it is a heroic medicine, but it would not come in the hands of the vulgar—it might have a Salutary effect upon Some of the higher classes. If men of influence—either by their abilities or wealth—can be lured to become the Patrons of liberal Sentiments, and will Support them, who are bold enough to Step forward in their defence—a...
For the first time since I was a lad, I have been making an excursion this season. Health and recreation were the double motive, though I am glad to say the latter predominated. I set out on horseback for the mountains in Virginia. I had never been into the antient dominion before, except merely upon its edge. Although it is filled with “Blenheims,” and “Hagleys” and “Mount Airys.” I was still...
Your Kind Letter of the 24th Instant did not reach my hand untill yesterday Though I knew you had a Thousand Talents, I never before disscovered you possessed that of rallery; which however late is of great advantage to me, as daily experience verifies the justice of your closeing observations and produced all the effect you intended, for neither you, or possterity, should hear more from me...
My Father has done me the favour to Communicate to me, the letters he has received from you on the subject of Grimm’s story of the Abbè de Mably. In the journal I conduct, my principal object is American literature & history past & contemporary. Anything relating to any portion of either is particularly agreable to me; and I need not say therefore how much gratified I should be, in being...
I yesterday received from the Post Office your very obliging Letter of the 16th. which has completely fulfilled the kind Engagement you offered me in your’s of the ninth. My only Apology for not immediately answering it arose soley from an apprehension of too soon giving you the additional Trouble, which I fear I have occasioned you from the trembling of your hand. But I will forget it in the...
I have now gone through Terence, and noted a few Lines for you to consider. Many perhaps have escaped my Notice that deserved it MHi : Adams Papers.
An extraordinary Paragraph which appeared in the Boston daily Advertiser of this morning, & which I inclose, (lest you should not take that Paper) induces me to renew a Correspondence, which I regret has been so long intermitted & which was always a Source of pleasurable & important information. No American who knew the Character of at lest one of the Diplomatists whom the Baron has thought...
When I send you last mail Basanistes, I was so much tortured with head–ache—that it was not in my power, to join to it one single line. The Post-master at first objected—if thus the postage comes higher than you might wish, I only executed your orders but should request—in that case to wait rather for a safe opportunity Perhaps—however—his scruples are unfounded. You render me nearly enamoured...