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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Having furnished the respectable Editon of the Medl. Repository with a summary Accot. of the City of Hava. I beg a presumption to request your acceptance of a Copy of that article from their last number. You will perceive Sir that, as there stated, it is but a summary; but as I intend collecting all my Notes into one View, I shall at a future day beg your acceptance, also, of that collection....
I have the honor to inform you, that Your Excellency has been, this day, elected President of the Massachusetts Society for promoting Agriculture, and I with great pleasure transmit this notification— I am Sir with great Esteem and / Respect— / Your very huml. Servt. MHi : Adams Papers.
The enclosed letter being from Mr: King, I apprehended might enclose one to me, from the gentlemen at Amsterdam; as I had forwarded letters upon your affairs through him to them—I therefore took the liberty of breaking the seal—But finding only open papers within, I now enclose the whole to you—I have not presumed to look into the contents. Yours faithfully MHi : Adams Papers.
I have now the pleasure of inclosing, the plan of a new Town I am erecting in the north of Scotland, where you will see the place destined for erecting a monument to the memory of our much respected friend General Washington. I hope that you have received the copies of the Generals letters to me, transmitted to you some months ago. At present they are a singular publication, but must be an...
Having received from you by the hands of your Son, the very acceptable Donation of the 2nd & 3d vol of your Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America; which renders the work complete, I am directed by the Society to transmit their thanks for your assistance, in thus advancing the design of their institution. I have the honour to be, / Your obedient servant, MHi...
I expected to have had the Honour of hearing from you before this time, on the subject of the publication of General Washingtons Letters, but I hope to have that pleasure soon. In the interim I beg to send an engraving of the proposed Monument and a plan of the new town of Thurso in which it is proposed to be erected. You will also herewith receive a paper on Longevity. Permit me to request...
We have this day a bill introduced to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—presented by Mr: Wright—It has pass’d to a second reading, and if it do not pass the Senate at the third, it will fail by a very small majority. A bill pass’d at the second reading, for the next Session of Congress to commence on the first Monday of November. The business of Congress is growing languid...
Returning to Hartford in the course of our Circuit, I found your letter, of July 27th. & August 5th: which had lain a month in the Post Office. From some appearances, I am led to believe that a correspondence so free as ours has been, cannot with perfect safety be carried on at present—I will however answer some of your enquiries. The letter You remark on, relative to the capture of...
I enclose you a letter, which I received last Monday, and by which you will learn the distressing misfortune which has befallen me—I have not communicated it to you before, from the wish that it might not come to the knowledge of my brother’s wife, at a moment when it might too much affect her—I have another letter from Washington, one day later than the one enclosed; my wife was then as well...
I received a few days since your very kind letter which I am ashamed of answering by a few lines; but by some accident I have fallen from a state of almost total idleness into an overwhelming flood of business, which leaves me scarcely a quarter of an hour of the day or of the Night—I sent you last week a copy of a volume in the form of a bill which I reported upon the Aggression business and...
Inclosd is the answer of the secretary of the Senate to a request that he woud furnish the department of state with the names of the Senators. There being no official certainty of the Senators newly elected to serve after the 3d. of March may produce some doubt respecting the propriety of a summons addressd to them individually. There is not to be found on the files of this department any copy...
I have now two letters from you, and one from my mother, which ought to be answered more particularly, than my time will admit—The business of the Session has been delayed, untill such an accumulation has taken place, as will very much hurry the close of our Time—And although I might perhaps without injury to the public, suffer the business to be done without taking much trouble about it...
I have been vary anxious and try‘d to send these Bricks that I engaged to you. I have obtained fair promissis from those with which I contracted to carry them, that they would be faithfull to come at those times they repeatedly set. After a multiplied series of disappointments the Bay thro’ which they must pass has frozen over which cuts off the expectation of getting them freighted, (or...
I have received your kind favour of the 6th: instt: and shall be careful to enclose the more important documents which may be printed from Time to Time— I hope my dear Mother has ere this entirely recovered from her illness. I had a letter from Mr: Shaw, one day later than your’s, in which he gives me a yet more flattering hope of her being on the recovery. Although the more my brother’s...
Mr: Welsh proposes to return home by the way of Amsterdam, and will be the bearer of this letter—With it, I enclose the 4th: number of the Gazette, and copies of former letters to yourself and to my dear mother. I wish I could promise myself a more speedy departure than that which I anticipated in my last letter to you; but we can no longer form a hope of my wife’s immediate recovery—There is...
The bill to protect foreign seamen, has been again debated this day, and various alterations in it made—It is less obnoxious than at first, but still contains mischief enough to produce very ill consequences—Duane made his appearance this day to report the debate—The first time for many weeks; indeed I believe the first time since the debate on the Amendment to the Constitution. No other...
I continue as long as possible to send you my gazette; but I now hope in the course of three weeks to leave Berlin—I have written to engage a passage for myself and family, on board the Catherine, Captain Ingersoll; from Hamburg for New–York. No opportunity for Boston occurs from that place; nor do I know of any from Bremen or either of the dutch ports—Besides which the journey from New–York...
I have very much regretted, my dear Sir, that the severity of the Season has deprived us of the pleasure of spending the Sunday with you for so many weeks; but it affords me some consolation that you have found so agreeable a companion in La Harpe, whose work I was well assured would prove a great source of entertainment to you—The volumes containing his account of the philosophy of the 18th:...
I have already written you a very long letter in answer to your favour of the 8th: instt:—and after writing it, upon reading it over concluded the best disposition I could make of it would be to burn it—Accordingly the flames have consumed it, and I must begin again. Your answers and observations upon my inquiries respecting the impressment of our seamen by the British are of the highest...
As I am informed there is a vessel soon to sail from Amsterdam for Boston I now forward to Mr. Bourne to go by her, this letter enclosing copies of my numbers 2 and 3. upon the Etat de la France &c. The book itself will go with the copy of my first letter concerning it, from Hamburg—Hauterive has generally been given out as its author; but Talleyrand himself is now understood to have had the...
I have two letters from you which ought to have been answered some time since, but I have only one apology for the delay, which I have so often mentioned that I am almost ashamed to repeat it. I have no time for writing except when the Senate is in Session, and when such business is before them, as I can suffer to proceed without paying much attention to it.—We have now come to sit on...
Since writing the within letter, I have seen Coll. Smith, who informs me that my Sister will probably have left you before this arrives—So I shall direct the whole to you. My wife has so far recovered that we think of going on this day as far as Elizabeth Town, and hope to proceed further on our journey to-morrow. But She is still so weak, that I am not a little apprehensive on her account—...
I have received, and communicated to this Government, my recall from the mission here—I shall hasten my departure as much as possible; but the situation of my wife who is still confined to her bed, renders it uncertain when she will be able to travel at all, and yet more when to undertake the voyage. If a favourable opportunity from Hamburg for Boston occurs I shall give it the preference—But...
I have taken a liberty which may require an apology. Thinking it necessary, I have, without your permission, inserted in the life of General Washington parts of letters written by you to him at the time of his appointment to the command of the army which was to be raised in 1798. I have ventured to do this because I thought it impossible that the act could be offensive to you, & because I had...
Among the papers of my late friend Mr.mr Brand-Hollis; I have been greatly gratified by the perusal of several letters from you, and by two from Mrs. Adams addressed to him. It is probable that I may print a Memoir of my munificent friend, in which I should greatly wish to introduce these letters, in testimony of the friendship which subsisted between the parties, and from my conviction of...
It is my intention during the short time that I expect to remain here, to send you from time to time such new publications in the french language, as may fall in my way, and appear to promise entertainment or matter of interesting meditation for you. With this design I purpose to combine another, which I am at least desirous to render of some utility to my Country.—The translation from Journal...
This prohibition of the admission of slaves into Louisiana, is like the drawing of a jaw tooth—We have expedient after expedient introduced to answer this purpose—Breckenridge has at last concentrated all his wisdom on the subject in the Amendment, which I now inclose you. This is a tolerably good device to reconcile the two parties of slave and anti-slave into which the majority are divided....
On my return to this Country permit me to take the earliest opportunity to express to you the warm sense of grateful obligation which I feel for your attention to my Wishes & those of my friends, in the nomination of me to the Commercial Agency of the U. S. at Havre de Grace in France—This place promises to an American House even greater Commercial advantages than that of Bordeaux which I had,...
You may probably recollect a paper communicated to the Academy, some years since, demonstrating the falsity of a mathematical Problem by Mr Winthrop, which was published in the 1st. part of the IId. Volume of the Memoirs. The communication referred to was by Mr. George Baron , an Englishman then residing at Hallowell, now at New-York. It was committed to President Willard and Professor Webber...
You will find, in the multitude of public documents, which I constantly transmit to you, the only apology I have to offer, for the irregularity which has crept upon the returns to your most valuable letters—Though I find it utterly impossible even to read all these papers, yet I feel it an indispensible duty to peruse with attention the greater part of them, and some of them require even a...