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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 61-70 of 286 sorted by relevance
I have taken the liberty to enclose you a few numbers of our weekly Spy, being from March 4, which is the commencement of the Volume.—Should they afford you any amusement, I shall be happy to continue sending them to you, and shall be amply rewarded in so doing.—With Sentiments of Esteem, I subscribe myself, your most obedient & / very huml Servt— MHi : Adams Papers.
I received together last Evening your two favours of 30th: ulto: and 2d: instt: for which I most sincerely return you my thanks.—In the dreary path which I am now compell’d to tread, it is cheering to the Spirits, and gives the most pleasing consolation to have occasionally the benefit of your correspondence.—What the issue of the election in Massachusetts, will be on the harmony of the ruling...
The third chapter of the book upon the State of France, concerns the relative situation of France, with regard to her allies. It begins with a magnificent eulogium upon that country, for her great exertions in former ages against the domineering ambition of the court of Rome, of the Venetian Republic, and of the house of Austria successively. There can be no doubt, but that the efforts of...
When I expressed a wish in writing to my brother, that you should purposely dismiss some part of that attention to the present course of public affairs, which I thought contributed much to make your hours unpleasant, I was not aware that your expectations of change in the politics of a considerable portion of the States, more favourable to the real interests, and morals of the Country, were so...
Enclosed you will receive Proposals for publishing by Subscription, a History of the late General George Washington; your presenting it to any of your friends, will greatly oblige me, and should you think proper to sanction it with your own name, it will be duly appreciated / By Sir, / Your most obedient Servant, MHi : Adams Papers.
I received some days since your kind favour containing the account of your occupations and amusements; and I have this day that of my brother dated at the close of the last and commencement of the present year—I have occasionally forwarded such public documents to you, as I supposed would be worthy of your perusal, together with the Journals of the two Houses—That of the Senate will I hope...
I wrote you a few lines from New-York, enclosing a copy of Commodore Morris’s Defence, for Mr: Shaw—The day after which I left that City and came on multum jactatus mare et terris—to Philadelphia in the Land Stage, and thence to Baltimore by the way of Newcastle and Frenchtown; chiefly by water—a mode of conveyance to me much more agreeable than that of a Stage Coach over the chaotic roads on...
On my return from the Sessions of our Court at New London, I had the pleasure of finding here your letter of the 6th Instant. I thank You sincerely for your affectionate remembrance, and am happy to find that you enjoy in your retirement, an undiminished share of health, and spirits; and without casting "One longing, lingering look behind", view the world only with that eye of curiosity and...
Be pleased to accept from an obscure individual a copy of a work, which after much care and labor he has prepared for the public, under an impression that it would be agreeable to the sons of science in general, and in particular that those more immediately interested would find their curiosity more peculiarly gratified. Give me leave to trouble you with an inquiry, whether you can give me the...
I have already sent you, one, or two specimens of translations from the German fabulist Gellert . I shall perhaps occasionally send you a few more, with the intention of giving you some idea of his character and merit, as a writer of fables. This cannot indeed be done in any other than a very imperfect manner, to those, who do not understand his own language. There is a mixture of archness &...