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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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From the encouragement which literature has received from you, I am encouraged to solicit the honor of your name to the inclosed Proposals... not doubting, if obtained, but what a people, daily increasing in learning, will follow the example,—as being made by the late Guardian of their country. I have the honor to be, / Sir, / your Excellency’s most obdient, / And most humble servant, MHi :...
Enclosed you will receive Proposals for publishing by Subscription, a History of the late General George Washington; your presenting it to any of your friends, will greatly oblige me, and should you think proper to sanction it with your own name, it will be duly appreciated / By Sir, / Your most obedient Servant, MHi : Adams Papers.
Having undertaken to publish a Journal, during the period I was an Officer in the Army, upon condition of Eight hundred subscribers to proposals made; I take the liberty of Writing to you a few lines, and enclosing one of the Hand Bills, wishing that you may do me the honor, that your Name may be placed at the head of the list of Subscribers Names.—Should the Book be dedicated to any...
The return of this anniversary cannot fail to awaken in our breasts the warmest sentiments of gratitude and esteem. It recalls to view the many important events of your public life, events intimately connected with those principles and proceedings which constitute the greatest glory of our country, and will form some of the most valuable pages in the history of nations. We hope the liberty we...
It had been impressed on my mind, that the next meeting of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences would be on the third Wednesday of the present month, and I did not discover my errer until it was too late to give the usual notice. It ought, by statute, to have been held yesterday (the 2d. Wednesday) at Cambridge. I request this in advertence, and would wish to know whether you will authorize...
Mÿ occupations in gathering seeds—and preparing my fields and garden for ensuing spring have thus far prevented my answering the favour, with which I was honored bÿ you last month—Tho’ mÿ hope of receiving, before this time, a decision about the Achaic Republick, had influenced this delaÿ. I sent it to Philadelphia, where my correspondent J. Mifflin will charge himself with super intending the...
Having furnished the respectable Editon of the Medl. Repository with a summary Accot. of the City of Hava. I beg a presumption to request your acceptance of a Copy of that article from their last number. You will perceive Sir that, as there stated, it is but a summary; but as I intend collecting all my Notes into one View, I shall at a future day beg your acceptance, also, of that collection....
The members of the house had arrived in sufficient numbers to form a House on Tuesday, the 7h. instant, but the Senate had not a quarum untill monday—(13h.). On that day they attempted to elect a President pro-tem. in the absence of the Vice President, who has not yet arrived but did not come to a choice. Mr. Tracy had 7 votes—Mr. Bradley—7—there were 2 featuring & 2 won blanks. Yesterday Mr....
A letter of mÿ frind Mr. Mifflin induces me to address you again few lines. Mr. Dobson returned him the Mss of the Achaic Republick, after many protestations of regard for the author the purchasers would not be sufficiently numerous to purchase an edition of this work It would answer extremely well in Europe—but he was under the necessity of declining the printing. Mr S. Bradford regretted...
I have been vary anxious and try‘d to send these Bricks that I engaged to you. I have obtained fair promissis from those with which I contracted to carry them, that they would be faithfull to come at those times they repeatedly set. After a multiplied series of disappointments the Bay thro’ which they must pass has frozen over which cuts off the expectation of getting them freighted, (or...
I was considerably amused by a News paper publication some few Weeks since, Which Paper I have lost or mislaid.—It was a description of something that tended to the great and long desideration of ascertaining Longitude. A Gent. was said to have departed on a Voyage from Philadelphia for some Port on the Eastern Continent, and during the Voyage, told the precise Longitude the Vessell was in...
I must answer your favours of Dec. 14 ult. and Jan the 3th. Want of time will once have the happy effect, to emportune you not with a Long Letter. How can you insinuate, that your correspondence is of no value? Is not every line of you then an act of kindness towards me? Not to saÿ, that I never received one, without some kind of instruction. But why Should I use any motif—to entreat you to...
In returning you my remarks—I hope to enjoy ere long the satisfaction, that, after a Second perusal, you may find them worthÿ a place among the Mem. of your Academÿ: if So, my debt towards you will be increased, as you may claim their additional value. However this may be, I am preparing a Memoir on the use of copper by the Greeks, addressed to John Luzac—to pay a part of the Intrest—if I can...
I have been gratified with the perusal of Mr Williams’s Observations, on the temperature of Sea Water at differt depths. And the publication is the first of the kind I have seen, or heard of, and suppose the Thermr. may be very usefull to mariners, if properly attended unto. The Gulf Stream, I am of Opinion, Occasions the sudden transitions from Cold (very Cold) to temperate and Warm—in our...
I send you mÿ Lett. on the use of copper among the Greeks—I can not flatter me, that it Shall procure you either much information, or amusement, but I maÿ have opened a new road for investigation, and then mÿ endeavours will have Some merit—at least in your eÿe. If it happened, that it deserved your approbation, that you deemed it worth a Public view, I Should intend it for the Pennsylvanian...
You will pardon my boldness, for my freedom in so often troubling you—but I thought you would have the Curiosity to peruse one of the Greatest Wonders of the Age—It is an Oration, said to be written by the Son of him, who would ransom a second time turn our Churches into brothels —& who wrote in legible characters, " will ransom our freedom a second time from the hands of the Opulent !"—This...
Know all Men by these Presents, That I, Cotton Tufts Junior of Weymouth in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Gentleman in Consideration of Seven Thousand Dollars lawful Money, paid by John Adams of Quincy in the County aforesaid Esquire the Receipt whereof I hereby acknowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and convey unto the said John Adams, his Heirs and assigns one...
Receieved by Cotton Tufts of the Honble John Adams Esq. Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents in full for one years Interest on his Note of hand given to me April 1802 —Quincy Thaxter and endorsed by him to us Said Note bearing Date March 29. 1802 Hingham April 20th. 1803 Received by Cotton Tufts of the Honbl. John Adams Esq. Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents being in full for one...
On the 16th of last month the King of Great Britain sent a message to Parliament announcing the termination of the discussions with France, and calling on them to support him in his determination to employ the power & resources of the nation in opposing the spirit of ambition and encroachments of the Government of France. Letters of marque had been issued against France, and I conjecture that...
Although a considerable period has elapsed since I have had the honor to address you, I have notwithstanding continued to entertain an uniform recollection of your former civilities, and an anxious Solicitude for your health and happiness. Flattering myself that the friendly concern which you were pleased hitherto to manifest towards me, has undergone no abatement. a sense of duty mingled with...
Since I Send you, at your for me So highlÿ gratifying—demand mÿ Lucubrations on Jefferson’s and Buffon’s theories —I have the honor to Submit to your criticism a Short essay on the use of copper and brass during the trojan War , addressed to our mutual frend John Luzac. I had the pleasure to send you, as you desired, his historÿ of the French Revolut . Could I imagine—that you would construe...
I am requested to give notice the Committee appointed by the Hor. Court of General Sessions of the peace at their last Term, purpose attending the buisness of Viewing the purpos’d Read by Dr. Veezeys Mills in Quincy as petitioned for by his Honor Edward H. Robbins Esqr. and others, will attend that service on Tuesday the sixth day of Septr. next at 9. 0clock A.M. said Comm’te will meet at...
Suffer me to inclose you, short proposals, for some matter, collected with both toil and perseverence. It is now ready for publication; and whatever encouragement you are disposed to give, to enable the printer to execute it, you will be pleased to transmit with Convenient expedition. There are a number of characters, with whom you have been connected in political life, who have been vilified...
The painful tidings I have this afternoon transiently heard relative to the health of my long beloved friend Mrs: Adams, induce me to trouble you with a line to enquire what is her present situation, of which you will be so kind as to inform me by the return of the post.—I pray that she may not be in so hazardous a state as is reported, but that her useful life may be protected.— You will...
How Shall it be in my power, to paÿ you mÿ Sincere thanks for the favours with which you continue to honour me—even above mÿ warmest expectation. I was not vain enough to attend at So much condescendence from your part, to offer mÿ Inset —with your own hand—to your illustrious Academÿ—by which I received the most unequivocal pledge of your high approbation—a more than equivalent reward for my...
I sent you, from Dedham, a copy of my Oration. Since my return home I have made diligent but fruitless enquiries for Mr Adams’s Sermon. Among a number of his sermons in the hands of two of his children it could not be found. It is strongly impressed upon me that I have seen it either in manuscript or print; and I have not quit the hopes of finding it, as soon as I can find it I shall certainly...
I duly received your esteemed favor of the 28 ult. More valuably as I know your time is employed, yet I cannot restrain the wish that you would have "Patience and leisure to make the friendly remarks" which arose on the perusal of my performance. I am sufficiently sensible of inaccuracies to be admonished, for the future, against too much confidence in my own information—a friendly eye to...
I have ascertained that Mr. Adams’s Sermon at the Dudleian Lecture was not published; a copy was deposited in the archives of the University agreeably to the wish of Judge Dudley. I am informed, in a Letter from the Rev. Mr. Cushing of Ashburnham, that it was a laboured Discourse on the Validity of Presbyterian Ordination, and for which the Author was much complimented. I have, for sometime,...
I duly received your esteemed favor of the 16th Ult. I assure you, without reserve, that I shall not misuse nor abuse the confidence you may be pleased to repose in me. By the first opportunity I had after the receipt of your Letter, I sent to Mr Russell of Boston for a paper contained the outline that you have so flatteringly expressed a wish to see. Expecting, post after post, to receive the...
As I was not confident of your kind indulgence, which I did so often experience, I should hesitate, to importune you again with a letter, as I cannot expect to enhance much the pleasures of your dignified retirement by my correspondence. As you hinted in your favour of Aug—last, that the fate of my remarks on Jefferson’s and Buffon’s whimsical theories would presumptively be decided at the...
The unusual obstructions to travelling prevented my receiving your esteemed favor of the 24th. ult. till a day or two ago. I am sensible to that discernment which has discovered in the " con Amore " of the Italians, the real temper in which I wrote the Outline. I wish it had been more just to you, and that I could find encouragement, now that the Public attention is engaged in designating a...
I indulged in this pleasure the 9th Inst., in reply to your esteemed favor of the 24th of February. I observe, in the Centinel, the offer of a place in Germantown on Lease by a Mr Stewart. If I could think a residence in the vicinity of Boston within my means, I would immediately make particular enquiries concerning Mr Stewart’s, for I am very desirous of placing myself more in the way of...
You may probably recollect a paper communicated to the Academy, some years since, demonstrating the falsity of a mathematical Problem by Mr Winthrop, which was published in the 1st. part of the IId. Volume of the Memoirs. The communication referred to was by Mr. George Baron , an Englishman then residing at Hallowell, now at New-York. It was committed to President Willard and Professor Webber...
Received of the Honorable John Adams Esq. by Cotton Tufts Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents in full for one years Interest on said Adams’s Note of hand given to me March 29th. 1802. MHi : Adams Papers.
Received of Hone John Adams Esq. by Cotton-Tufts one Hundred Thirty five Dollars Six Cents in full for one years Interest on his said Adams’s promissory Note to me bearing Date March 29th 1802. MHi : Adams Papers.
Received of the Honorable John Adams Esq. by Cotton Tufts Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents in full for one years Interest on said Adams’s promisory Note bearing Date March 29. 1802. given to me the Subscriber— MHi : Adams Papers.
KNOW all Men by these Presents, That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Esquire in Consideration of The natural Love and affection I bear to my Son John paid by Quincy Adams of Quincy aforesaid Esquire the Receipt whereof do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and convey unto the said John Quincy Adams of Tract of Land Situated on the Rise of Penns hill in Said Quincy...
I have the honour to inform your goodness that since you left Madras Coast, I wrote about four or five letters but no line was favored from you an answer thereof—I last Dispatched a letter and a tiger skin by the Ship Captaïn John Neckils through the means of Ship Markee which I think would certainly have Delivered up to your goodness. I therefore hope your goodness will be pleased to Send a...
I hope you’ll be so good as to excuse the liberty of my troubling you with a Letter on a Subject which concerns me in the most Particular manner. I was Married in the Year 1780 to a Mr: Summer Adams, a Native of America (Who’s Father was a Merchant in Boston Named Jno. Adams) by whom I had three Sons who are all liveing the Eldest is in Labrador. My Husband was taken about Eleven Years Since...
Having taken a Journey this summer to New-England to meet with my friends at their Yearly meeting held at Newport on Rh., Island (which is lately over), I rememberd the kind attention thou paid whilst in the station of Chief Magistrate of the United States, to a letter & transcript therein enclosed, which I, in conjunction with my frd. Jacob Lindley, sent thee, on the subject therein...
I should have before this used mÿ priviledge of writing to you, had I not been informed by the Rev. Smith, who did me the pleasure to dine with us, that you Sir, with your respected family enjoy’d a perfect health—He had been a classmate of your son Boylston, and was profuse in his encomiums on the Rev. Ernat —He delighted to instil in Mr Mappa and me the high opinion you fostered of that...
During a Conversation which I had the Honor to hold with you, soon after your Inauguration in the Year 1797., I mentioned the circumstance of our little army being at that period, without an Established Uniform for the officers; you expressed surprise at the irregularity of the Fact, & to remedy the defect, directed me to make the necessary regulations.— I think it probable that an incident so...
I rely on your goodness to pardon me for this intrusion, which springs from my solicitude to preserve inviolate, as far as may be in my power, the sound principles by which Military institutions are governed. A single Officer (Col. Butler) not long since, resisted an order for regulating the Uniform of the Head; standing alone in apposition to his Brethren & the universal practice of armies,...
It has again become my duty to address you on a melancholly subject. The excellent President Willard , whose discourse we so lately heard at the funeral of the lamented Howard is now no more. I am In making arrangements, yesterday, for the funeral, the family requested the Corporation to name the Pall Holders. It is the wish of the Corporation, that you would consent to be one, if you it...
As you assured me in your last favour, with which you honoured me the 3d. of march, that my letters did give you alwaÿs pleasure. You cannot find fault with me, that I, tho persuaded owing this flattering mark of approbation more to your kindness towards me, than to my merits, take hold of a sane opportunity in conveying to You a few lines; which my Son shall bring at the Post office at...
Having been honored with a commission of a Captain in the Navy by you, and still desirous of preserving your good Opinion, which I highly prize, I have taken the liberty to send your Excellency my defence, upon charges exhibited against me, by Order of the President of the United States. I have the honor to be, Sir / with great respect, Your / Obedient Servant, MHi : Adams Papers.
It was under Your administration of the Government of the United States that pirates ceased to insult us and to Scorn our prowess and Skill on the Ocean, It is under the administration of Mr Jefferson that our energies have ceased—our Character stained—millions lavished in marine affairs without judgment or to any good purpose, and those very picaroons who Stood Appald at the sight of our flag...
As I esteem a peculiar favour that you continue to honour me with your correspondence, for which I chieflÿ am indebted to your friend Ship and condescending kindness; Is deemed a duty to renew from time to time mÿ assurances of high respect, tho’ fullÿ Satisifed, that my gratefulness for received favours never was doubted. Your generosity—if I might Seem to interrupt you too often—will make...
Your letter of the 6th: instant revived a great many pleasant ideas in my mind. I have not forgotten—I cannot forget you. You and your excellent Mrs Adams often compose a subject of conversation by my fire side. We now and then meet with a traveler who has been at Quincy, from whom we hear with great pleasure, not only that you enjoy good health, but that you retain your usual good spirits,...
On my return from the Sessions of our Court at New London, I had the pleasure of finding here your letter of the 6th Instant. I thank You sincerely for your affectionate remembrance, and am happy to find that you enjoy in your retirement, an undiminished share of health, and spirits; and without casting "One longing, lingering look behind", view the world only with that eye of curiosity and...