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The last letter, which I had the honour to receive from you, dated January 3d, I have before acknowledged. Permit me to remind you, that I have in expectation something farther from you, concerning the misnamed Aristides. I am perfectly ashamed to speak to you again of my Chathams, but it is unavoidable. The three concluding numbers, the printers refuse to publish. In two of them I had...
Much time has elapsed indeed, Since you have favoured me with your last Letters—and more, Since I dropt to you my last line—I do not plead another excuse than my particular Situation—Tho at times I was not in want of leisure, to acquit meself of an incumbent duty, but then mÿ mind was not often enough composed, and a numerous correspondence within and without this continent imposed imperiously...
‘Till I received your last of the 4th: instant I had no idea that you doubted the truth of Washington’s letter relative to the capture of Cornwallis and supposed you only questioned the propriety of his allowing a letter to be published, in which he appears to boast of his success in stratagems. You express a wish that "the veracity of the letter might be established beyond all cavil." I can...
Le Colonel fleury mon mari que vous avés honoré de votre estime & de Votre bienveillance a cessé de Vivre. le Délabrement de Sa Santé, la mélancolie, & les souffrances qui étoient la Suite de Son état lui rendoient depuis quelque tems la vie insupportable; & le même Courage qui lui fit si Souvent braver la mort dans les Combats l’a malheureusement porté a abréger ses jours. il me laisse dans...
I have the honour to send you enclosed the copy of a convention which I have signed with Lord Hawkesbury concerning the 6. & 7. Arts. of the Treaty of 1794—As the discussions which led to this Result were begun and conducted under your instructions, I feel it to be my Duty, as well as a mark of Respect that is due to you, to send you this Copy by the same opportunity that I avail myself of, to...
In Contemplating the events that have lately taken place in Spain, and their probable Consequences, I we feel disposed to exclaim in the bold Apostrophe of Jeremiah “O! thou Sword of the Lord, how long will it be ere thou be quiet? Put up thyself into thy Scabbard, rest, and be Still.” Chapt: 47. verse 6th: shall we hope that a Voice from heaven has arrested the destroyer of nations, or is he...
How can I make a return for your favors which you continue to bestow upon me—as having nothing to offer besides an unfeigned gratitude. Had I an higher opinion of mÿ Letters, whose acceptance I chiefly owe to your indulgent kind partiality: and would saÿ with Horace—Gaudes Carminibus, carmina possumus Donare—Now I have not even this plea—but I have three of your Letters before me— I have been...
I have Deferred Acknowleging the reipt. of your Very Obliging Lettr. Of 16 June Last wherein in a Peculiar Manner you are pleased to Except of your Guest. May it be to you the Service intended from the Simplicity of honist intentions—And I hartily Wish I Could So Easily transpourt the Doner to your preasence for an hour when your Lasure Would Admit—He which in the first Moments Endeavour to...
I have been vary anxious and try‘d to send these Bricks that I engaged to you. I have obtained fair promissis from those with which I contracted to carry them, that they would be faithfull to come at those times they repeatedly set. After a multiplied series of disappointments the Bay thro’ which they must pass has frozen over which cuts off the expectation of getting them freighted, (or...
I had the pleasure to receive, this morning, your favor of the 1st: currt: and now hasten to acknowledge it, with more eagerness, on account of the long interval, which has elapsed, since I have written particularly to yourself. I am not sorry, that you consider politicks, as forbidden fruit, for though you cannot fail to form an opinion, upon the very novel & extraordinary occurrences, in...
I Send you A few Lines to Enform you That I have Receivd, A letter from My Mother the 20 of May 1806 Enforming Me that All the Fammily of Your Late Deceased Brother Is Well at present And I hope that these few Lines Will find You the Same. I also Enform you that After the Death of My father I was Oblidgd to Come to this Cuntry for to Git My Living and I find it Very hard to do that here—I...
Mÿ occupations in gathering seeds—and preparing my fields and garden for ensuing spring have thus far prevented my answering the favour, with which I was honored bÿ you last month—Tho’ mÿ hope of receiving, before this time, a decision about the Achaic Republick, had influenced this delaÿ. I sent it to Philadelphia, where my correspondent J. Mifflin will charge himself with super intending the...
Your Excellent Communication of the 26th. Ult. is highly appreciated among our friend here; and I do think, it would Expand it’s beneficial Effects, on the Affairs of our Nation if it’s contents could be published. But as I have no leave from you to do it, I shall feel my self bound not to do it.—Please Sir, to Accept my most cordial thanks for your goodness in making the Communication. I am...
It is the unanimous request of the Corporation of Harvard college, that you would honor the College with your company on the next Commencement day. I hope, Sir, that you will accept the invitation. Your presence will give great pleasure to all, and to none more than to him who begs leave to subscribe, / with Sentiments of the highest respect, / Sir, / your most humble, / and most obedient...
I received, on the last day of December, the 2d. and 3d. volumes of the Defence, for which I renew my thanks. You have truly characterized this work in the comparison you have made of it, in your Letter of the 3d. inst. to a Boudoir. Many of the evils which you have described as incident to an unbalanced government, we have found by experience to have been insufficiently guarded against by our...
The unusual obstructions to travelling prevented my receiving your esteemed favor of the 24th. ult. till a day or two ago. I am sensible to that discernment which has discovered in the " con Amore " of the Italians, the real temper in which I wrote the Outline. I wish it had been more just to you, and that I could find encouragement, now that the Public attention is engaged in designating a...
You shall not expect an excuse, for mÿ dilaÿing a few days to return the inclosed. Mÿ heart was too much oppressed with grief: I took refuge to Labour to assuage its pain. My young friend Mappa brought me your Lett. in mÿ garden—first I thought to keep it unopened—till I arrived home—its unusual thickness impelled me to break its seal—I perused first Cremer’s Letter—glanced over your lines—and...
I have received your kind favour of the 6th: instt: and shall be careful to enclose the more important documents which may be printed from Time to Time— I hope my dear Mother has ere this entirely recovered from her illness. I had a letter from Mr: Shaw, one day later than your’s, in which he gives me a yet more flattering hope of her being on the recovery. Although the more my brother’s...
Had I not been favoured with so manÿ proofs of your kindness I should have hesitated to undertake the task in writing this letter; more so, as I flatter’d meself, that it should have been in mÿ friend’s power, to satisfy in this article the utmost of your wishes. But here I fear I shall be disappointed, as this is the time of the ÿear of making up his annual accounts, which require all his...
The House of Representatives of the United States having passed a resolution directing the Secretary of the Treasury to lay before them at their next Session a list of all balances due to the United States on account of monies advanced, it is desirable to Settle as many accounts as it Shall be found practicable to examine before the first day of October next, and particularly in cases where it...
I was considerably amused by a News paper publication some few Weeks since, Which Paper I have lost or mislaid.—It was a description of something that tended to the great and long desideration of ascertaining Longitude. A Gent. was said to have departed on a Voyage from Philadelphia for some Port on the Eastern Continent, and during the Voyage, told the precise Longitude the Vessell was in...
How long have I waited in answering your favour of 23th. of aug–with which you again honoured your old frend? To anÿ other I should be obliged, to make an apologÿ for my silence, during such a long interval of time—but your kindness—acquainted with mÿ circumstances, relieves me of this burden. You enjoÿ—honored and loved by all what surround you, otium cum dignitate, while I see my Labours and...
The return of this anniversary cannot fail to awaken in our breasts the warmest sentiments of gratitude and esteem. It recalls to view the many important events of your public life, events intimately connected with those principles and proceedings which constitute the greatest glory of our country, and will form some of the most valuable pages in the history of nations. We hope the liberty we...
Having furnished the respectable Editon of the Medl. Repository with a summary Accot. of the City of Hava. I beg a presumption to request your acceptance of a Copy of that article from their last number. You will perceive Sir that, as there stated, it is but a summary; but as I intend collecting all my Notes into one View, I shall at a future day beg your acceptance, also, of that collection....
Long Since I Should have acquitted me of my duty in congratulating you with your Safe arrival at your beloved Quincÿ, but the apprehension of interrupting your contentment—the onlÿ reward for all—your Services and Sacrifices—during a long meritorious life, if you could disregard the applauses of enlightened Europe—persuaded me to postpone it a while. Tho in the medden of your friends—in the...
Mr: Welsh proposes to return home by the way of Amsterdam, and will be the bearer of this letter—With it, I enclose the 4th: number of the Gazette, and copies of former letters to yourself and to my dear mother. I wish I could promise myself a more speedy departure than that which I anticipated in my last letter to you; but we can no longer form a hope of my wife’s immediate recovery—There is...
I have not had the pleasure to receive a Line from you in Some time—Did you know what pleasure your letter gave me and how they Chiered my Old heart in these Drary times of Our Country your humanity and friendly disposition Would Often raise My Druping Spirits—for lete Me assure you Sir, they have been Sadly Depressed Since your Son gave up his year in the Senate. Especially this Season when...
I indulged in this pleasure the 9th Inst., in reply to your esteemed favor of the 24th of February. I observe, in the Centinel, the offer of a place in Germantown on Lease by a Mr Stewart. If I could think a residence in the vicinity of Boston within my means, I would immediately make particular enquiries concerning Mr Stewart’s, for I am very desirous of placing myself more in the way of...
The Selectmen of the Town of Boston, present their most respectful compliments to Mr. Adams; and request the honour of his company at the visitation of the Schools on wednesday the 8th July next;—and to dine at Faneuil hall. MHi : Adams Papers.
Received of Hone John Adams Esq. by Cotton-Tufts one Hundred Thirty five Dollars Six Cents in full for one years Interest on his said Adams’s promissory Note to me bearing Date March 29th 1802. MHi : Adams Papers.
Your favour of the 14th: instt: came to my hands just at a moment to renew and to strengthen impressions which had been weighing heavily upon my mind for near a month—The general questions relative to the powers and the process of expulsion under our Constitution had been forced upon me by the situation in which I was placed as Chairman of the Committee on the present Inquiry—My own...
Your letter of the 28th. instant has just come to hand, and I have stepped into the house of a friend to answer acknowledge it. I cannot sufficiently thank you & the worthy Mitchill for your friendly attention to my wishes. I called to day, for the first time, at the Custom-house, and there learnt that General Lincoln, as superintendent of the Marine-Hospital, had requested Dr Eustis to take...
Long since I should have indulged mÿ wishes in writing you a few lines, had it been in mÿ power, to make anÿ communications worthÿ your attention, but, perpending, respected friend! how much I owe you alreadÿ, I did consider it rather indelicate, to intrude, too often, in your retirement, and avocate ÿou from more interesting occupations. This time, however, mÿ plea Sir! shall be accepted bÿ...
This will be handed you by Mr Charles Coffin, son of Dr. Coffin of Newbury port, educated at Harvard College, a prime scholar, & now a Candidate for the Ministry, & Vice President of Greenville College in Tennessee—He is commissioned by the Trustees of sd. College to sollicit contributions to the funds of sd. College, & was sollicitous to confer with you, sir, on the subject, it being...
The politicks of our City are under the direction of three Classes of people, old tories, merchents, and brokers. They are neither anticipating, nor retrospective animals. All their calculations are for the present moment. They know nothing of its treaties, nor of the former volcanic eruptions of the power and tyranny of France. The last shower with them is always the heaviest. Why then do you...
The letter you did me the honor to write to me, reached this place during my absence on a visit to my esteemed Parents and that beloved Sister, whose letter to me accidentally fell into your hands, and which you had the goodness to enclose.—I returned only a few days ago from Oldenbarneveld, or I should have embraced an earlier opportunity of expressing my sincere thanks for your kindness and...
I must answer your favours of Dec. 14 ult. and Jan the 3th. Want of time will once have the happy effect, to emportune you not with a Long Letter. How can you insinuate, that your correspondence is of no value? Is not every line of you then an act of kindness towards me? Not to saÿ, that I never received one, without some kind of instruction. But why Should I use any motif—to entreat you to...
I send you mÿ Lett. on the use of copper among the Greeks—I can not flatter me, that it Shall procure you either much information, or amusement, but I maÿ have opened a new road for investigation, and then mÿ endeavours will have Some merit—at least in your eÿe. If it happened, that it deserved your approbation, that you deemed it worth a Public view, I Should intend it for the Pennsylvanian...
The task assigned me by your Letter of the 1st: ultimo, “to enquire, ascertain and establish all those points of the Common law, which are now in force in the United States, and in the individual States; and on the contrary those points, which have been altered by Statutes or by the Revolution and the Constitutions of Government, which have been established in consequence of it;” has magnified...
The bill to protect foreign seamen, has been again debated this day, and various alterations in it made—It is less obnoxious than at first, but still contains mischief enough to produce very ill consequences—Duane made his appearance this day to report the debate—The first time for many weeks; indeed I believe the first time since the debate on the Amendment to the Constitution. No other...
I have seldom been more highly gratified than by the receipt of your letter of Novr 11th. The latter part of it accords perfectly with Opinions I have long cherished. You may see a short account of those Opinions in an Oration delivered before our Philosophical Society upon “the influence of physical Causes upon the moral faculty” published in the first Volume of my Inquiries. They shocked for...
Your highly esteemed Favour of the 16th Apl. made me happy to find my Letter of the 11th March was taken so kindly—This Moment hearing of the Departure of my Friend Mr. Wm. Crafts our late Navy Agent, I cou’d not any longer omit the Acknowledgmt. of yours, He is a Gentleman of Boston has resided here many years has a family & lately lost his Wife. He can let you know all about us here, as well...
Having unexpectedly received an opportunity of conveying you my cursory remarks on some parts of Buffon’s and Jefferson’s Theory on Nat. Hist. by my Frend Col. John Lincklaen, I could not resist the temptation in Submitting them to your criticism, persuaded that you Shall bestow on me a new favour, if you condescend to their perusal and think them So much worth your attention, to communicate...
I continue as long as possible to send you my gazette; but I now hope in the course of three weeks to leave Berlin—I have written to engage a passage for myself and family, on board the Catherine, Captain Ingersoll; from Hamburg for New–York. No opportunity for Boston occurs from that place; nor do I know of any from Bremen or either of the dutch ports—Besides which the journey from New–York...
KNOW all Men by these Presents, That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Esquire in Consideration of The natural Love and affection I bear to my Son John paid by Quincy Adams of Quincy aforesaid Esquire the Receipt whereof do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and convey unto the said John Quincy Adams of Tract of Land Situated on the Rise of Penns hill in Said Quincy...
An inflammation in my eyes which for several days has confined me to my house, and rendered writing difficult and painful, must be my Apology for the Shortness of this letter. I admire the Correctness of your history of the ten talents committed to the Subject of your letter. Upon the talent of his taciturnity Mr Liston gave me the following Anecdote, “that he was the only person he had ever...
For five or six Years past at least, very rarely have I been seen from home (or wish’d to be) excepting at Church or Funerals, but my Duty to my Country & to our old Standbys tho’ now in my 78th, compell’d me in our late Election to take up my feeble pen again, at least to shew my good Will & Inclination, & tho’ many able Hands were not wanting, yet sorry am I to say, all our Efforts fail’d...
tho a stranger I take the Liberty of addressing you on a subject that very much Interests me, & I hope will you—I have become acquainted with a Miss Francis Adams the Daughter of Mr. Jno. Adams, who Married a Sister of Ebenz. Oliver Esqr. of Boston—Dr. Rand—married (I believe) another Sister—this Dear Girl, is Young, & Beautiful—& a Relation of your own—She had a Brother who made a very...
I once met Alexander Cruden the Author of the Concordance of the Scriptures at Charles Dilly’s. He was then about 70 years of Age. The only thing he said while I was in his Company made an impression upon my mind which the lapse of near 40 years has not worn away. It was this. “God punishes some Crimes in this world to teach us there is a Providence, and permits Others to escape with impunity,...
Being again favoured with a new mark of your continued kindness I will not bereave meself of the pleasure in answering your Letter. Long since had I written Sir! had it been in my power, to communicate something, deserving your attention—without it—I thought it improper, to abuse of your indulgence too often. I took hold of the first opportunity—offered by the season, to let you know—that I...