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I have been extremely flattered by the letter which you did me the honor to write me on the 10th. Inst. It is no virtue to be insensible to the praise of great & good men. I could not have received a more grateful reward for any labour than your approbation. I beg the favor of being presented very respectfully to Mrs. Adams. and / have the honor to be / with sentiments of the highest...
I expected to have had the Honour of hearing from you before this time, on the subject of the publication of General Washingtons Letters, but I hope to have that pleasure soon. In the interim I beg to send an engraving of the proposed Monument and a plan of the new town of Thurso in which it is proposed to be erected. You will also herewith receive a paper on Longevity. Permit me to request...
Your letters are full of aphorisms. Every paragraph in them suggests new ideas, or revives old ones. You have given a true picture of parties in our Country. We have indeed no national Character, and however much we boast of it, there are very few "true Americans" in the United States. We have four distinct parties in Pennsylvania. 1. old tories. 2. honest federalists. 3 violent democrats. 4....
Before I proceed to remark upon the particular causes alledged by the citizen Hauterive in his book upon the State of France at the end of the 8th: year, as having disorganized the public law of Europe, it is proper to observe, that one of the greatest apparent purposes of the work, is to hold out a lure of temptation to the Austrian cabinet . To superficial observation, this may appear to...
I had the pleasure to write you the 3d. inst. I follow it with this to make the explanation of the concluding part of that letter which subsequent discoveries have made necessary. I mentioned a particular object as my inducement to a public notice of Mr. J. Q. A., in the thirteenth number of certain speculations, but it appears that the occasion I intended to influence has gone by in advance...
We have seen in examining the first chapter of the volume “upon the state of France at the end of the 8th: year”—that the author’s object there was to prove, that at the breaking out of the french revolution, there existed no public law in Europe, & we have alledged the grounds upon which we consider him as having failed in the proof of this proposition. The second chapter is entitled “general...
We have this day a bill introduced to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—presented by Mr: Wright—It has pass’d to a second reading, and if it do not pass the Senate at the third, it will fail by a very small majority. A bill pass’d at the second reading, for the next Session of Congress to commence on the first Monday of November. The business of Congress is growing languid...
I know not how to satisfy the demands you make upon my time and patience without entering into discussions, which, at this late day, I have no wish to call up. Yet the chain of your illiberal criticisms still kept up in your subsequent letters, obliges me, however reluctantly, to pursue my remarks. I shall, therefore as leisure permits, attend to most of your paragraphs, exclusive of the...
The package I had the honor of forwarding to you was from my honored Father Samuel Foxcroft of New Gloucester.—He has had the misfortune to lose his sight one year ago, be reason of an inflamation in the Same his eyes; And by reason of his never having made use of glasses, & his whole time having been spent in reading & writing; the loss has been very sensibly felt by him.—He did not know of...
Having been honored with a commission of a Captain in the Navy by you, and still desirous of preserving your good Opinion, which I highly prize, I have taken the liberty to send your Excellency my defence, upon charges exhibited against me, by Order of the President of the United States. I have the honor to be, Sir / with great respect, Your / Obedient Servant, MHi : Adams Papers.
Your Very Frindly Letter of the 14th. March last Came Duly to hand. it gave and Still gives Me Much pleasure—I am allso Much pleased with my son Henry for doing himself so Much Sattisfaction As his Paying you that respect that He Knew I should have done if Near you on a Journey to Boston—He realy gave Me Much Sattisfaction that his Pollitical ideas pleased you. His Lettes to Me Are full of...
The extreme bad traveling for some time past has prevented my calling and paying to you the debt of my most dutiful Gratitude While I sympathise with my country in the loss which they have sustained by the events of the late election it is some consolation that you will suffer less by the change than any other of your fellow citizens in the Union. Some few of them may be ingrateful for your...
When I consider, I was once a Pupil at Braintree in the mansion House of your venerable Father, I claim a Sort of Right to Indugence to address you, which your wontted Benevolence will not deny me; Time, I dare say, has not yet effaced the Remembrance of the little Phamphlet , intitled, “ Tears of the Serv’edors ” and another intitled The Progress of civil & rational Liberty . Through those...
Permit me to present you with a Copy of the medal voted me by Congress, and executed agreeable to Your directions (to the Secretary of the Navy) as President of the United States, and I pray you good Sir, to receive it as a Small token of the veneration, Respect and Esteem I bear towards you. May you live long and enjoy health and happiness in the Sincere prayer Dear Sir of Your sincere friend...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...
I hope you will not Deem this Letter Impertinent or Improper,—I was a Justice of the peace for P G County and I am told by a Gentleman of Veracity who saw it, that I was in the Nomination in the List made out by you, but in the Publication in the News papers after you Left this, I was Left out all together,— I shall be thankful if you will be good Enough to Inform me how this happened and...
I was highly gratified by the receipt of the letter of the 9th instant which you did me the honor to write me. Your Approbation of the Reply to the Legislature of Massachusetts, and of the measures of the General Government was extremely flattering. The crisis is highly important, but I trust and hope that the Almighty Guardian of America will still protect her against the open attacks and...
The painful tidings I have this afternoon transiently heard relative to the health of my long beloved friend Mrs: Adams, induce me to trouble you with a line to enquire what is her present situation, of which you will be so kind as to inform me by the return of the post.—I pray that she may not be in so hazardous a state as is reported, but that her useful life may be protected.— You will...
Your favor of the 10th: instant and that of the 12th: ult: on the same subject claim my thanks. I find in the journals of Congress for 1774 to which you refer me, the best clue to the investigation, and I shall avail myself of copious extracts from the documents therein exhibited. There is a remarkable uniformity in the expressions used by the Constituents of the first delagates from the...
As your Letter of the 29 of Jan—afforded me a Sensible pleasure, I will procure meself another in writing you again. God be praised, that your health is unimpaired—it must continue so manÿ daÿs, if the warm wishes of your Relatives and friends obtain their accomplishments—our own interests—mÿ Dear Sir! prompts this wish. I spent this winter verÿ agreablÿ—partlÿ with mÿ old Classick friends...
Your two letters on La Harpe, I have taken the liberty to publish in the Port Folio, and I have now to ask the favor of you, as your leisure & inclination may serve, to pursue your extracts & comments upon any portion of that great work, which you may find agreeable or think useful. I make this request in behalf of the Editor of the Port Folio, who will be flattered & obliged by any literary...
Returning to Hartford in the course of our Circuit, I found your letter, of July 27th. & August 5th: which had lain a month in the Post Office. From some appearances, I am led to believe that a correspondence so free as ours has been, cannot with perfect safety be carried on at present—I will however answer some of your enquiries. The letter You remark on, relative to the capture of...
Your neighbours and friends assembled to celebrate the anniversary of your natal day, beg leave to approach you with sincere congratulations upon the pleasing occasion. Be assured Sir, that no lapse of time can abate our respect and gratitude for your long, laborious and faithful public services, or diminish our affectionate attachment to your person and character. An attachment founded in the...
I received by Mr. J. Q. Adams the volumes of the “defence of the Constitutions,” for which I presume I am indebted to you.—Although I have not since had much leisure, I have still had enough to read, with some attention, the 3d. volume; particularly your examination of Nedham’s wrong constitution of a Commonwealth.—I am more than ever satisfied that the animadversions it your work has received...
From the encouragement which literature has received from you, I am encouraged to solicit the honor of your name to the inclosed Proposals... not doubting, if obtained, but what a people, daily increasing in learning, will follow the example,—as being made by the late Guardian of their country. I have the honor to be, / Sir, / your Excellency’s most obdient, / And most humble servant, MHi :...
Having seen a Letter over your Signature, Addressed to Mr. Green, I feel myself constrain’d to return You my most Grateful Acknowledgement, for the high & Respectful Compliment, which you have been pleased to pay, bestow, on our Reply to the Resolutions of the Resolutions of the Massachusetts Legislature. We conceived it a duty, we Owed to Ourselves, to Our Constituents, and to Our Country, to...
How Shall it be in my power, to paÿ you mÿ Sincere thanks for the favours with which you continue to honour me—even above mÿ warmest expectation. I was not vain enough to attend at So much condescendence from your part, to offer mÿ Inset —with your own hand—to your illustrious Academÿ—by which I received the most unequivocal pledge of your high approbation—a more than equivalent reward for my...
I feel a pleasure in forwarding to you the second part of the Transactions of the Philosophical Society for 1806 and the first part for 1807, which that Society have been pleased to transmit to you through me which I hope you will receive safe by Captain LeBosquet of the Morneo . In the same Packet, I have sent duplicates for Bowdoin College may I beg the favor of you to cause the same to be...
I have ascertained that Mr. Adams’s Sermon at the Dudleian Lecture was not published; a copy was deposited in the archives of the University agreeably to the wish of Judge Dudley. I am informed, in a Letter from the Rev. Mr. Cushing of Ashburnham, that it was a laboured Discourse on the Validity of Presbyterian Ordination, and for which the Author was much complimented. I have, for sometime,...
At a time of life when retirement is sought for, and the release from all political attentions desired, ten long letters of accusation and reproach, of interrogation and retrospection, within the term of a few weeks, may be designed, not only to distress, but to create passions in my bosom which were never felt nor indulged. When I finished mine of August 15th, I thought I might calculate on a...
The difficult and complicated labors of my professorship consisting of teaching, examining, reviewing theses &c &c being now nearly over, I sit down with great pleasure to pay my epistolary debts. You are my largest, and most lenient Creditor. The first dividend of my time of Course is due to you. I concur with you in your reflections upon the Western insurrection, but not altogether in your...
I enclose you a letter, which I received last Monday, and by which you will learn the distressing misfortune which has befallen me—I have not communicated it to you before, from the wish that it might not come to the knowledge of my brother’s wife, at a moment when it might too much affect her—I have another letter from Washington, one day later than the one enclosed; my wife was then as well...
The hurry always connected with the prevalence of a yellow fever in our City; has prevented my answering your letter of Augst: 25th: at an earlier day. The opinion relative to too close an Alliance with France in the year 1776 was communicated to me by you I think for the first time in Baltimore. I was led from this circumstance to believe you had delivered it on the floor of Congress in that...
By the Maryland Sloop of war Cap. John Rodgers a Box or case was directed for You, and was delivered in the public Store in September last. Since that I have been in daily expectation that it would have been called for by your order, and as that does not appear to be the Case, I suppose You have received no advice of its being shipped; in consequence thereof, I have taken the liberty to...
As I esteem a peculiar favour that you continue to honour me with your correspondence, for which I chieflÿ am indebted to your friend Ship and condescending kindness; Is deemed a duty to renew from time to time mÿ assurances of high respect, tho’ fullÿ Satisifed, that my gratefulness for received favours never was doubted. Your generosity—if I might Seem to interrupt you too often—will make...
My last letter to you, was of November 25. since which I have not enjoyed the pleasure of receiving a line either from my mother or from you—To her I have in the interval written once; and now enclose a press copy of the letter, in case the original should fail in the conveyance. My numerous letters to the Secretary of State, and to my brother will I hope apologize for my silence during so...
It is intended with the leave of Providence to settle a Gospel Minister in this Town, the solemnity to be performd on Wednesday the 6th. of October next, at which time it will be highly gratifying to Willm. and Abigail Cunningham to be honoured with a visit from your Excellency and Lady. the pleasant season for travelling, the high and well ventilated situation here, whch is favourable to...
The Affectionate Attachment, I ever had for you, has induced me, to take a liberty, which I pray, may meet your abrobation;—My Dear Wife, was safely delivered of a Son, on Sunday, the Twenty fifth January last; on Sunday last, Fifth April, (being Easter day) he was Babtized, and Named John Adams, he is a fine Babe; should Providence permit him to live, to become a Man; the Wish and Prayers of...
I duly received your esteemed favor of the 16th Ult. I assure you, without reserve, that I shall not misuse nor abuse the confidence you may be pleased to repose in me. By the first opportunity I had after the receipt of your Letter, I sent to Mr Russell of Boston for a paper contained the outline that you have so flatteringly expressed a wish to see. Expecting, post after post, to receive the...
I received a few days since your very kind letter which I am ashamed of answering by a few lines; but by some accident I have fallen from a state of almost total idleness into an overwhelming flood of business, which leaves me scarcely a quarter of an hour of the day or of the Night—I sent you last week a copy of a volume in the form of a bill which I reported upon the Aggression business and...
I enclose you the letter I mentioned in my last, from the person whom I supposed to be your son in law. The letter from his son has been mislaid. I have neither friend, nor Correspondent in new york of the name of Wm Smith except your son in law, and having never before seen his hand writing, and supposing he had dropt Ste his middle name of Stephens, I had no doubt of the letter coming from...
Inclosd is the answer of the secretary of the Senate to a request that he woud furnish the department of state with the names of the Senators. There being no official certainty of the Senators newly elected to serve after the 3d. of March may produce some doubt respecting the propriety of a summons addressd to them individually. There is not to be found on the files of this department any copy...
I send you by this opportunity a french pamphlet entitled “ Bacon , as he is ; or denunciation of a french translation of his works, published at Dijon by Mr Ant. La Selle—by J. A. De Luc—Reader to the Queen of G. Britain, Fellow of the royal Societies of London & Dublin, member of the Society of naturalists at Berlin, of that of mineralogy at Jena & of several others—Professor of Philosophy...
HAVING secured the copy right of a book, of which the enclosed is a prospectus, I take the liberty, though personally unacquainted with you, of requesting such information of the events of the period mentioned in the prospectus, as you may, from your public station, have been particularly acquainted with. As it relates to the biographical sketch that will be given of your own character, the...
At lenght I take again mÿ pen, to assure you of the high respect, with which I am So fortunate to feel mÿ bosom glow for the un-appreciated blessings, which you have bestowed on a dear an ungrateful Countrÿ, for the kindness, which with you continue to honour your old frend—and what less can I return to the man, of whom a Washington declared, that none could more cordially than himself approve...
Yesterday the Schooner Ocean Capt: Richard Barney Arrived at this Port from Barbadoes via Turks Island, in which Vessel came passenger Doctr. John Kean of Philadelphia, late Surgeon of the Ship Leander, formerly commanded by Capt. Lewis of New York, Doctor Kean informs me that on the 20th of last June he left the Son of Collo. Smith of New York on board the Leander with General Miranda at...
I have now two letters from you, and one from my mother, which ought to be answered more particularly, than my time will admit—The business of the Session has been delayed, untill such an accumulation has taken place, as will very much hurry the close of our Time—And although I might perhaps without injury to the public, suffer the business to be done without taking much trouble about it...
Enclosed is a News-paper containing, under the Worcester head, a copy of some remarks made at a Meeting of this Town. The author is so plainly indicated by the style of his address, and by his initial, that it is unnecessary, and might appear ostentatious, to be more particular. With affection and gratitude, / I am, Dear Sir, / Your Friend & Servt. MHi : Adams Papers.
Your favour of the 25th: found me, in the midst of parliamentary contest, which occupied me too intensely to admit of that early acknowledgment, which a deep sense of the honour, you have conferred on me, dictated. The battle has raged, with some warmth; and it has been my fate, to be in the hottest of it. Whether my exertions were as wise, as, I am sure, they were, well intended, I confess, I...
When you permited me to become your correspondent, I did not intend that it should be so long before I claim’d the privilege. But ill health, and an attention to the duties which you assign’d me, have hitherto deprived me of that gratification. On the 4th. of March, after dinner, I went to the Presidents house to take charge of the boxes which you left there in the morning. I found the house...