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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I have been extremely flattered by the letter which you did me the honor to write me on the 10th. Inst. It is no virtue to be insensible to the praise of great & good men. I could not have received a more grateful reward for any labour than your approbation. I beg the favor of being presented very respectfully to Mrs. Adams. and / have the honor to be / with sentiments of the highest...
I expected to have had the Honour of hearing from you before this time, on the subject of the publication of General Washingtons Letters, but I hope to have that pleasure soon. In the interim I beg to send an engraving of the proposed Monument and a plan of the new town of Thurso in which it is proposed to be erected. You will also herewith receive a paper on Longevity. Permit me to request...
Your letters are full of aphorisms. Every paragraph in them suggests new ideas, or revives old ones. You have given a true picture of parties in our Country. We have indeed no national Character, and however much we boast of it, there are very few "true Americans" in the United States. We have four distinct parties in Pennsylvania. 1. old tories. 2. honest federalists. 3 violent democrats. 4....
Before I proceed to remark upon the particular causes alledged by the citizen Hauterive in his book upon the State of France at the end of the 8th: year, as having disorganized the public law of Europe, it is proper to observe, that one of the greatest apparent purposes of the work, is to hold out a lure of temptation to the Austrian cabinet . To superficial observation, this may appear to...
I had the pleasure to write you the 3d. inst. I follow it with this to make the explanation of the concluding part of that letter which subsequent discoveries have made necessary. I mentioned a particular object as my inducement to a public notice of Mr. J. Q. A., in the thirteenth number of certain speculations, but it appears that the occasion I intended to influence has gone by in advance...
We have seen in examining the first chapter of the volume “upon the state of France at the end of the 8th: year”—that the author’s object there was to prove, that at the breaking out of the french revolution, there existed no public law in Europe, & we have alledged the grounds upon which we consider him as having failed in the proof of this proposition. The second chapter is entitled “general...
We have this day a bill introduced to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—presented by Mr: Wright—It has pass’d to a second reading, and if it do not pass the Senate at the third, it will fail by a very small majority. A bill pass’d at the second reading, for the next Session of Congress to commence on the first Monday of November. The business of Congress is growing languid...
I know not how to satisfy the demands you make upon my time and patience without entering into discussions, which, at this late day, I have no wish to call up. Yet the chain of your illiberal criticisms still kept up in your subsequent letters, obliges me, however reluctantly, to pursue my remarks. I shall, therefore as leisure permits, attend to most of your paragraphs, exclusive of the...
The package I had the honor of forwarding to you was from my honored Father Samuel Foxcroft of New Gloucester.—He has had the misfortune to lose his sight one year ago, be reason of an inflamation in the Same his eyes; And by reason of his never having made use of glasses, & his whole time having been spent in reading & writing; the loss has been very sensibly felt by him.—He did not know of...
Having been honored with a commission of a Captain in the Navy by you, and still desirous of preserving your good Opinion, which I highly prize, I have taken the liberty to send your Excellency my defence, upon charges exhibited against me, by Order of the President of the United States. I have the honor to be, Sir / with great respect, Your / Obedient Servant, MHi : Adams Papers.