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Among the papers of my late friend Mr.mr Brand-Hollis; I have been greatly gratified by the perusal of several letters from you, and by two from Mrs. Adams addressed to him. It is probable that I may print a Memoir of my munificent friend, in which I should greatly wish to introduce these letters, in testimony of the friendship which subsisted between the parties, and from my conviction of...
I feel a pleasure in forwarding to you the second part of the Transactions of the Philosophical Society for 1806 and the first part for 1807, which that Society have been pleased to transmit to you through me which I hope you will receive safe by Captain LeBosquet of the Morneo . In the same Packet, I have sent duplicates for Bowdoin College may I beg the favor of you to cause the same to be...
You begin your Letter, Sir, of August 8th. with complaints of “new demonstrations of Mrs. Warren’s friendship.” Indeed, I cannot see the smallest foundation of complaint from page 229, Vol. 3d. of the Revolutionary History, to signing the Treaty with Great Britain page 232, that could give cause for the smallest umbrage, except the inadvertency of placing the names of Benjamin Franklin and...
I know not how to satisfy the demands you make upon my time and patience without entering into discussions, which, at this late day, I have no wish to call up. Yet the chain of your illiberal criticisms still kept up in your subsequent letters, obliges me, however reluctantly, to pursue my remarks. I shall, therefore as leisure permits, attend to most of your paragraphs, exclusive of the...
Your fourth Letter like the preceding ones, discovers a fixed determination to mis-construe every expression of mine, where-ever You, Sir, are introduced in my History of the American Revolution. I am astonished that you should discover so much resentment at a sentence in page 140, particularly at the word mortified. I did, at the time alluded to, think you in a mortified situation. I did...
Before I had an opportunity to forward my reply to yours of July 11th: I received another letter under date July 20th containing twenty pages, in which so many demands are made and so many threats denounced, that a total silence might be construed dismay. My thread of existence in this evanescent state is too far spent for me again to enter on political discussion; yet, I think it my duty to...
After a long suspension of a friendly literary intercourse, it was very unexpected to me this day, to receive a letter from the hand of Mr. Adams;—nor can I conceive of any thing that should occasion a resentment in his bosom, or prevent his old style of address to Mrs. Warren, or give the semblance of an “old friend being hastily converted into an enemy;”—much less could I have expected to...
I once met Alexander Cruden the Author of the Concordance of the Scriptures at Charles Dilly’s. He was then about 70 years of Age. The only thing he said while I was in his Company made an impression upon my mind which the lapse of near 40 years has not worn away. It was this. “God punishes some Crimes in this world to teach us there is a Providence, and permits Others to escape with impunity,...
Having a considerable time since took the liberty of addressing you, being the Widow of your late Brother Summers, of whom I gave the particulars of, stating that by his Death I was left with three Children to maintain by my labour, which thanks be to God I have hitherto done.— Therefore Sir, having an opportunity per favor of the Bearer Captain Philip De Gruchy of this Island, who has known...
The Fire and Marine Insurance Office are now repaying the third part of their capital, to which they were authorized by an Act of the Legislature; and issuing new Certificates to the Stockholders—The old Certificates must therefore be returned into the Office—I will thank you to send me, by the earliest opportunity, your Certificate for the forty shares, which stand in my name, but of which...
Permit me to trouble you with the delivery of the enclosed letter to Dr Tufts. It contains an Account of the death of his patient Mr: Land, and a small sum of money to be sent by the Doctor to Mr: Land’s parents in new Hamshire. I sent you Mr Stevens’s pamphflet “on the dangers of the Country” a few days ago. I beg your Acceptance of it. Since the date of my last letter I have been made very...
tho a stranger I take the Liberty of addressing you on a subject that very much Interests me, & I hope will you—I have become acquainted with a Miss Francis Adams the Daughter of Mr. Jno. Adams, who Married a Sister of Ebenz. Oliver Esqr. of Boston—Dr. Rand—married (I believe) another Sister—this Dear Girl, is Young, & Beautiful—& a Relation of your own—She had a Brother who made a very...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of Your highly esteemed letter, which you did me the honour to write me, under the date of the 11th. of May current. Having written many speculations (between the begining of the year 1770, and the present time,) under the signature of a military Countryman, I was fully aware, that my stile, Signature, and motto, would discover the writer, but it is from your...
You shall not expect an excuse, for mÿ dilaÿing a few days to return the inclosed. Mÿ heart was too much oppressed with grief: I took refuge to Labour to assuage its pain. My young friend Mappa brought me your Lett. in mÿ garden—first I thought to keep it unopened—till I arrived home—its unusual thickness impelled me to break its seal—I perused first Cremer’s Letter—glanced over your lines—and...
In one of your former letters you say as an excuse for your not assuming the reserve of certain public men, that you never beleived yourself to be a “great man”, and of Course did not expect that every thing you said, and did & wrote would be the subject of public Observation and Scrutiny. I consider your not preserving a Copy of your letter to your youthful friend Mr Webb as a proof of the...
Be pleased to accept from an obscure individual a copy of a work, which after much care and labor he has prepared for the public, under an impression that it would be agreeable to the sons of science in general, and in particular that those more immediately interested would find their curiosity more peculiarly gratified. Give me leave to trouble you with an inquiry, whether you can give me the...
I enclose you the letter I mentioned in my last, from the person whom I supposed to be your son in law. The letter from his son has been mislaid. I have neither friend, nor Correspondent in new york of the name of Wm Smith except your son in law, and having never before seen his hand writing, and supposing he had dropt Ste his middle name of Stephens, I had no doubt of the letter coming from...
The difficult and complicated labors of my professorship consisting of teaching, examining, reviewing theses &c &c being now nearly over, I sit down with great pleasure to pay my epistolary debts. You are my largest, and most lenient Creditor. The first dividend of my time of Course is due to you. I concur with you in your reflections upon the Western insurrection, but not altogether in your...
As your Letter of the 29 of Jan—afforded me a Sensible pleasure, I will procure meself another in writing you again. God be praised, that your health is unimpaired—it must continue so manÿ daÿs, if the warm wishes of your Relatives and friends obtain their accomplishments—our own interests—mÿ Dear Sir! prompts this wish. I spent this winter verÿ agreablÿ—partlÿ with mÿ old Classick friends...
The package I had the honor of forwarding to you was from my honored Father Samuel Foxcroft of New Gloucester.—He has had the misfortune to lose his sight one year ago, be reason of an inflamation in the Same his eyes; And by reason of his never having made use of glasses, & his whole time having been spent in reading & writing; the loss has been very sensibly felt by him.—He did not know of...
Honrble Sir I am Possesed of A paper Executed To Samel Adams Malster of Boston & others it was Executed Decembr 1718 if it concerns you it is in my Power To Do you Some Service if the late govern Samel Adams was A Relative & it be in your Power I wish you To Inform me by letter who is heirs Are & who Administered upon his Estate & where they live if it concern you A letter To me will be...
I received nearly ten days since your very kind letter, which has hitherto remained unanswered owing to the very sudden transition we made, from almost total idleness, to an excessive press of business—This transition was introduced by a question upon the building of a bridge , which has already made five days of debate, and upon which the question is not yet finally taken—Besides this Mr:...
I can but confess my neglect in not letting you Know that I received your Verry polite answer of the 12th. Sept: 1805. on the 16th. of the Same Month, to mine of the 6th. of the Same you must Know, Sir, that one of the greatest satisfactions to me is the Keeping up a correspondence with some of the old Sages of our Revolution, and I hope it will not be considered as flattery in me if I place...
I have been waiting like Horace’s Clown till the Stream of my business should so far lessen that I could pass over it, in order to acknowledge the receipt of your interesting letter upon the Subject of the perfectibility of human nature, but as that Stream, from adventitious currents pouring into it, rather encreases, than lessens, I have seized a few moments merely to testify my gratitude for...
Narrowly bound in a DisInterested Friendship of Many Years, with Mr John Luzac Proffessor att Leyden Who often Confided Me the Marks of Esteem he received from you his Respected Friend, as Well as of the Immortal Washington, I Now take the Mournfull Task to Announce to you his Tresspass, in a Dreadfull Manner, by the Explosion of a barge with Gunpowder that Laid Contrary to the Laws, in the...
I spent two days as disagreable, as anÿ in mÿ life—tears bedewed my cheeks and reason and religion could not entirely assuage the pains I felt. It is my lot not to feel—not to act by halves. Saturday I heard the report of your death—and yesterday night first the Albanÿ gazette of the 8th. mention i ng not a word of this Sad event relieved me in part of excruciating pangs. Restore peace to my...
I herewith send you Asmall book, which having your Name in it I suppose it to be yours. and that I borrowd it when we ware at Colledg together) tho I have littile or no rememberance of it. Why it was not then returnd, or why it has not since been returned before now, I can give but poor too poor an account, I but can say Im not sesibel there has ben any frautilant aim or design.—in the...
I have seldom been more highly gratified than by the receipt of your letter of Novr 11th. The latter part of it accords perfectly with Opinions I have long cherished. You may see a short account of those Opinions in an Oration delivered before our Philosophical Society upon “the influence of physical Causes upon the moral faculty” published in the first Volume of my Inquiries. They shocked for...
How long have I waited in answering your favour of 23th. of aug–with which you again honoured your old frend? To anÿ other I should be obliged, to make an apologÿ for my silence, during such a long interval of time—but your kindness—acquainted with mÿ circumstances, relieves me of this burden. You enjoÿ—honored and loved by all what surround you, otium cum dignitate, while I see my Labours and...
Ever since the receipt of your last letter I have passed my days like an arrow shot from a bow. At a time of life when (to use an expression in one of your letters written to me soon after your return from England) “nature sighs for repose,” I live in a Constant round of business, which employs both body and mind. Even my studies (the times for which are taken from family Society or Sleep) are...
We had the pleasure to see here this Summer William Dandridge Peck Esqe: who delivered us your letter of 24. May 1805. this Gentleman’s Stay here was Very Short, yet We endeavored to make it as agreable and as interesting to him as possible; in Short recommanded by you he met with that Regard which every one of your Friends is entitled to.— We are Very Sensible indeed to your obliging...
You ascribe wonders to the influence of Silence and Secrecy in public men. I agree with you in their effects upon characters, and human Affairs. Dr South says the “world was made for the bold.” But they possess but only half of it,—the other half was made for the “Artful”—among whom I include nearly all silent men. I say nearly all, for we now and then meet with persons who are silent from...
I Send you A few Lines to Enform you That I have Receivd, A letter from My Mother the 20 of May 1806 Enforming Me that All the Fammily of Your Late Deceased Brother Is Well at present And I hope that these few Lines Will find You the Same. I also Enform you that After the Death of My father I was Oblidgd to Come to this Cuntry for to Git My Living and I find it Very hard to do that here—I...
Yesterday the Schooner Ocean Capt: Richard Barney Arrived at this Port from Barbadoes via Turks Island, in which Vessel came passenger Doctr. John Kean of Philadelphia, late Surgeon of the Ship Leander, formerly commanded by Capt. Lewis of New York, Doctor Kean informs me that on the 20th of last June he left the Son of Collo. Smith of New York on board the Leander with General Miranda at...
At the request of my Wife I called upon a friend of mine a few days ago to borrow “the secret memoirs of the Court of St: Cloud.” He said he had not a copy of it—but politely put into my hands “Cumberlands memoirs of his own life”, which I have since filled up the leisure minutes of the day in reading. It is a pleasant Work, and contains a good deal of information of men and things which would...
At lenght I take again mÿ pen, to assure you of the high respect, with which I am So fortunate to feel mÿ bosom glow for the un-appreciated blessings, which you have bestowed on a dear an ungrateful Countrÿ, for the kindness, which with you continue to honour your old frend—and what less can I return to the man, of whom a Washington declared, that none could more cordially than himself approve...
I have taken a liberty which may require an apology. Thinking it necessary, I have, without your permission, inserted in the life of General Washington parts of letters written by you to him at the time of his appointment to the command of the army which was to be raised in 1798. I have ventured to do this because I thought it impossible that the act could be offensive to you, & because I had...
I enclose you a letter, which I received last Monday, and by which you will learn the distressing misfortune which has befallen me—I have not communicated it to you before, from the wish that it might not come to the knowledge of my brother’s wife, at a moment when it might too much affect her—I have another letter from Washington, one day later than the one enclosed; my wife was then as well...
Herewith you will receive a small publication that contains several new Opinions in Physiology, and which admit of being applied to the cure of several diseases. If you have no inclination to read it, please to put it into the hands of your family physician. He may probably pick up something from it that may be the means of lessning the pain, or preventing the mortality of a disease in your...
My long delay in answering your last letter has arisen from two causes—an unusual share of business from an unusually sickly Spring—and the Want of Subjects for a letter that would be interesting to you. I perfectly accord with you in your opinions respecting the tendency, and issue of the present state of things in the World. Never perhaps was there a time in which there was more to fear from...
An indisposition of a week–occasioned bÿ a severe cold–with the unavoidable transactions of familÿ concerns, compelled, me to delaÿ an answer to your Lett. with which your kindness has again favoured me. I restored myself to health–in taking a liberal portion of veal—cotelets—and a free draught of generous wine for mÿ supper–two nights after another–and now I enjoÿ, as well as ever–health and...
I have two letters from you which ought to have been answered some time since, but I have only one apology for the delay, which I have so often mentioned that I am almost ashamed to repeat it. I have no time for writing except when the Senate is in Session, and when such business is before them, as I can suffer to proceed without paying much attention to it.—We have now come to sit on...
I avail myself of the first leisure hour I have had since the Conclusion of my lectures to acknowledge your last favor. I shall begin my Answer to it by answering the question with which you concluded it. The Barilla is a native of the seacoast of the United States. It is to be found on the shores of Massachusetts, and of the Delaware states. From the interest you have kindly taken in my...
I read again your excellent, Lectures, and have now bÿ them be pleased and instructed much more, than with the cursorÿ perusal of them in their former State—It is the historÿ of Nations—resolved in Problems—of which the Solution is to be Search’d for in the Annals of everÿ countrÿ—while the events of more modern times maÿ be considered as So manÿ Corallaries, deducible from the Same data. To a...
I had fully intended to have paid my personal respects to you on Saturday last, had not the unfavorable change in the state of the roads prevented. That mode of communication having failed, I have now to offer the best homage of Mrs Humphreys & myself to Mrs Adams & yourself, and to request the honour of your company at dinner with us, on Saturday next, it being the anniversary of the Birth of...
Since the date of your favour of the 29th: ulto: you have doubtless received many additional documents confirming your opinion of the system of policy prevalent here in relation to our foreign affairs—Unqualified submission to France, and unqualified defiance of Great Britain, are indeed the two pillars upon which our measures are to rest—And numerous as the proofs are which you will have of...
Being again favoured with a new mark of your continued kindness I will not bereave meself of the pleasure in answering your Letter. Long since had I written Sir! had it been in my power, to communicate something, deserving your attention—without it—I thought it improper, to abuse of your indulgence too often. I took hold of the first opportunity—offered by the season, to let you know—that I...
I received some days since your kind favour containing the account of your occupations and amusements; and I have this day that of my brother dated at the close of the last and commencement of the present year—I have occasionally forwarded such public documents to you, as I supposed would be worthy of your perusal, together with the Journals of the two Houses—That of the Senate will I hope...
I committed to Mr Vanhan a few days ago, a copy of the new edition of my medical Inquiries and Observations who kindly promised to convey them to you in a small box consigned to Mr Gideon Snow merchent in Boston. Some of the essays contained in them will I hope interest you, particularly those upon Animal life, the influence of physical causes upon morals, and the thoughts upon Old Age....
I take the Liberty to Send to you a Little Pamphet—That if it is Not Instructive to a Cultivated Mind it May Serve to an honor in a January Day When Better Company Would be More Agreable—And When read Will you be pleased to Acquaint Me that it Came Safe to your hands Otherwise, you Will perhaps be plauged with Duplicates—These Matters are some Measure is planed to Draw a Line from you, as I...