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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 121-150 of 286 sorted by date (ascending)
I duly received your esteemed favor of the 28 ult. More valuably as I know your time is employed, yet I cannot restrain the wish that you would have "Patience and leisure to make the friendly remarks" which arose on the perusal of my performance. I am sufficiently sensible of inaccuracies to be admonished, for the future, against too much confidence in my own information—a friendly eye to...
I have ascertained that Mr. Adams’s Sermon at the Dudleian Lecture was not published; a copy was deposited in the archives of the University agreeably to the wish of Judge Dudley. I am informed, in a Letter from the Rev. Mr. Cushing of Ashburnham, that it was a laboured Discourse on the Validity of Presbyterian Ordination, and for which the Author was much complimented. I have, for sometime,...
This prohibition of the admission of slaves into Louisiana, is like the drawing of a jaw tooth—We have expedient after expedient introduced to answer this purpose—Breckenridge has at last concentrated all his wisdom on the subject in the Amendment, which I now inclose you. This is a tolerably good device to reconcile the two parties of slave and anti-slave into which the majority are divided....
I duly received your esteemed favor of the 16th Ult. I assure you, without reserve, that I shall not misuse nor abuse the confidence you may be pleased to repose in me. By the first opportunity I had after the receipt of your Letter, I sent to Mr Russell of Boston for a paper contained the outline that you have so flatteringly expressed a wish to see. Expecting, post after post, to receive the...
As I was not confident of your kind indulgence, which I did so often experience, I should hesitate, to importune you again with a letter, as I cannot expect to enhance much the pleasures of your dignified retirement by my correspondence. As you hinted in your favour of Aug—last, that the fate of my remarks on Jefferson’s and Buffon’s whimsical theories would presumptively be decided at the...
The bill to protect foreign seamen, has been again debated this day, and various alterations in it made—It is less obnoxious than at first, but still contains mischief enough to produce very ill consequences—Duane made his appearance this day to report the debate—The first time for many weeks; indeed I believe the first time since the debate on the Amendment to the Constitution. No other...
The foreign Seamen Law, was yesterday postponed to the first Monday in December.—yeas 21. nays 11.—I was not present at the vote having been obliged to attend the Supreme Court, to argue my second Cause before them—This I began yesterday, and finished this morning. Mr: L. Martin of Baltimore is at this moment occupied as the scissars of my arguments —(You know where this comes from.)—I have...
The unusual obstructions to travelling prevented my receiving your esteemed favor of the 24th. ult. till a day or two ago. I am sensible to that discernment which has discovered in the " con Amore " of the Italians, the real temper in which I wrote the Outline. I wish it had been more just to you, and that I could find encouragement, now that the Public attention is engaged in designating a...
You will see by the folio sheet I inclose to you, that the House of Representatives have not yet done with the Government of Louisiana.—The fourth Section is the only one in which there seems much difficulty to the Legislators of the day—Many attempts were made to vary that here, and they are renewed in the House—They sport with Louisiana, as a Cat sports with a mouse—But to help our...
We have this day a bill introduced to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—presented by Mr: Wright—It has pass’d to a second reading, and if it do not pass the Senate at the third, it will fail by a very small majority. A bill pass’d at the second reading, for the next Session of Congress to commence on the first Monday of November. The business of Congress is growing languid...
A letter is now reading from Captain Bainbridge, with an account of the loss of the frigate Philadelphia, wreck’d on rocks on the coast of Tripoli—the last week in October—They were in pursuit of a Tripolitan Cruizer, and struck on rocks, not laid down in any Chart they had on board —Captain Bainbridge and 307 men, are prisoners in Tripoli—I have already seen an account of this misfortune in...
I indulged in this pleasure the 9th Inst., in reply to your esteemed favor of the 24th of February. I observe, in the Centinel, the offer of a place in Germantown on Lease by a Mr Stewart. If I could think a residence in the vicinity of Boston within my means, I would immediately make particular enquiries concerning Mr Stewart’s, for I am very desirous of placing myself more in the way of...
You may probably recollect a paper communicated to the Academy, some years since, demonstrating the falsity of a mathematical Problem by Mr Winthrop, which was published in the 1st. part of the IId. Volume of the Memoirs. The communication referred to was by Mr. George Baron , an Englishman then residing at Hallowell, now at New-York. It was committed to President Willard and Professor Webber...
Received of the Honorable John Adams Esq. by Cotton Tufts Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents in full for one years Interest on said Adams’s Note of hand given to me March 29th. 1802. MHi : Adams Papers.
Received of Hone John Adams Esq. by Cotton-Tufts one Hundred Thirty five Dollars Six Cents in full for one years Interest on his said Adams’s promissory Note to me bearing Date March 29th 1802. MHi : Adams Papers.
Received of the Honorable John Adams Esq. by Cotton Tufts Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents in full for one years Interest on said Adams’s promisory Note bearing Date March 29. 1802. given to me the Subscriber— MHi : Adams Papers.
KNOW all Men by these Presents, That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Esquire in Consideration of The natural Love and affection I bear to my Son John paid by Quincy Adams of Quincy aforesaid Esquire the Receipt whereof do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and convey unto the said John Quincy Adams of Tract of Land Situated on the Rise of Penns hill in Said Quincy...
I have the honour to inform your goodness that since you left Madras Coast, I wrote about four or five letters but no line was favored from you an answer thereof—I last Dispatched a letter and a tiger skin by the Ship Captaïn John Neckils through the means of Ship Markee which I think would certainly have Delivered up to your goodness. I therefore hope your goodness will be pleased to Send a...
I hope you’ll be so good as to excuse the liberty of my troubling you with a Letter on a Subject which concerns me in the most Particular manner. I was Married in the Year 1780 to a Mr: Summer Adams, a Native of America (Who’s Father was a Merchant in Boston Named Jno. Adams) by whom I had three Sons who are all liveing the Eldest is in Labrador. My Husband was taken about Eleven Years Since...
Having taken a Journey this summer to New-England to meet with my friends at their Yearly meeting held at Newport on Rh., Island (which is lately over), I rememberd the kind attention thou paid whilst in the station of Chief Magistrate of the United States, to a letter & transcript therein enclosed, which I, in conjunction with my frd. Jacob Lindley, sent thee, on the subject therein...
I should have before this used mÿ priviledge of writing to you, had I not been informed by the Rev. Smith, who did me the pleasure to dine with us, that you Sir, with your respected family enjoy’d a perfect health—He had been a classmate of your son Boylston, and was profuse in his encomiums on the Rev. Ernat —He delighted to instil in Mr Mappa and me the high opinion you fostered of that...
During a Conversation which I had the Honor to hold with you, soon after your Inauguration in the Year 1797., I mentioned the circumstance of our little army being at that period, without an Established Uniform for the officers; you expressed surprise at the irregularity of the Fact, & to remedy the defect, directed me to make the necessary regulations.— I think it probable that an incident so...
I rely on your goodness to pardon me for this intrusion, which springs from my solicitude to preserve inviolate, as far as may be in my power, the sound principles by which Military institutions are governed. A single Officer (Col. Butler) not long since, resisted an order for regulating the Uniform of the Head; standing alone in apposition to his Brethren & the universal practice of armies,...
It has again become my duty to address you on a melancholly subject. The excellent President Willard , whose discourse we so lately heard at the funeral of the lamented Howard is now no more. I am In making arrangements, yesterday, for the funeral, the family requested the Corporation to name the Pall Holders. It is the wish of the Corporation, that you would consent to be one, if you it...
As you assured me in your last favour, with which you honoured me the 3d. of march, that my letters did give you alwaÿs pleasure. You cannot find fault with me, that I, tho persuaded owing this flattering mark of approbation more to your kindness towards me, than to my merits, take hold of a sane opportunity in conveying to You a few lines; which my Son shall bring at the Post office at...
I have been happy to receive your obliging favour of the 14th: instt: and am much obliged to you for your opinions respecting the points of maritime Law, which require our attention at this Time—A coincidence of your opinion with that of the President of the United States, would be more than enough to stagger me in any point upon which I should have formed a different one—It makes me therefore...
I wrote you a few lines from New-York, enclosing a copy of Commodore Morris’s Defence, for Mr: Shaw—The day after which I left that City and came on multum jactatus mare et terris—to Philadelphia in the Land Stage, and thence to Baltimore by the way of Newcastle and Frenchtown; chiefly by water—a mode of conveyance to me much more agreeable than that of a Stage Coach over the chaotic roads on...
Having been honored with a commission of a Captain in the Navy by you, and still desirous of preserving your good Opinion, which I highly prize, I have taken the liberty to send your Excellency my defence, upon charges exhibited against me, by Order of the President of the United States. I have the honor to be, Sir / with great respect, Your / Obedient Servant, MHi : Adams Papers.
I have received your kind favour of the 6th: instt: and shall be careful to enclose the more important documents which may be printed from Time to Time— I hope my dear Mother has ere this entirely recovered from her illness. I had a letter from Mr: Shaw, one day later than your’s, in which he gives me a yet more flattering hope of her being on the recovery. Although the more my brother’s...
It was under Your administration of the Government of the United States that pirates ceased to insult us and to Scorn our prowess and Skill on the Ocean, It is under the administration of Mr Jefferson that our energies have ceased—our Character stained—millions lavished in marine affairs without judgment or to any good purpose, and those very picaroons who Stood Appald at the sight of our flag...