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Before I proceed to remark upon the particular causes alledged by the citizen Hauterive in his book upon the State of France at the end of the 8th: year, as having disorganized the public law of Europe, it is proper to observe, that one of the greatest apparent purposes of the work, is to hold out a lure of temptation to the Austrian cabinet . To superficial observation, this may appear to...
We have seen in examining the first chapter of the volume “upon the state of France at the end of the 8th: year”—that the author’s object there was to prove, that at the breaking out of the french revolution, there existed no public law in Europe, & we have alledged the grounds upon which we consider him as having failed in the proof of this proposition. The second chapter is entitled “general...
We have this day a bill introduced to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—presented by Mr: Wright—It has pass’d to a second reading, and if it do not pass the Senate at the third, it will fail by a very small majority. A bill pass’d at the second reading, for the next Session of Congress to commence on the first Monday of November. The business of Congress is growing languid...
I enclose you a letter, which I received last Monday, and by which you will learn the distressing misfortune which has befallen me—I have not communicated it to you before, from the wish that it might not come to the knowledge of my brother’s wife, at a moment when it might too much affect her—I have another letter from Washington, one day later than the one enclosed; my wife was then as well...
My last letter to you, was of November 25. since which I have not enjoyed the pleasure of receiving a line either from my mother or from you—To her I have in the interval written once; and now enclose a press copy of the letter, in case the original should fail in the conveyance. My numerous letters to the Secretary of State, and to my brother will I hope apologize for my silence during so...
I received a few days since your very kind letter which I am ashamed of answering by a few lines; but by some accident I have fallen from a state of almost total idleness into an overwhelming flood of business, which leaves me scarcely a quarter of an hour of the day or of the Night—I sent you last week a copy of a volume in the form of a bill which I reported upon the Aggression business and...
I send you by this opportunity a french pamphlet entitled “ Bacon , as he is ; or denunciation of a french translation of his works, published at Dijon by Mr Ant. La Selle—by J. A. De Luc—Reader to the Queen of G. Britain, Fellow of the royal Societies of London & Dublin, member of the Society of naturalists at Berlin, of that of mineralogy at Jena & of several others—Professor of Philosophy...
I have now two letters from you, and one from my mother, which ought to be answered more particularly, than my time will admit—The business of the Session has been delayed, untill such an accumulation has taken place, as will very much hurry the close of our Time—And although I might perhaps without injury to the public, suffer the business to be done without taking much trouble about it...
I have received your kind favour of the 6th: instt: and shall be careful to enclose the more important documents which may be printed from Time to Time— I hope my dear Mother has ere this entirely recovered from her illness. I had a letter from Mr: Shaw, one day later than your’s, in which he gives me a yet more flattering hope of her being on the recovery. Although the more my brother’s...
Mr: Welsh proposes to return home by the way of Amsterdam, and will be the bearer of this letter—With it, I enclose the 4th: number of the Gazette, and copies of former letters to yourself and to my dear mother. I wish I could promise myself a more speedy departure than that which I anticipated in my last letter to you; but we can no longer form a hope of my wife’s immediate recovery—There is...
Your favour of the 14th: instt: came to my hands just at a moment to renew and to strengthen impressions which had been weighing heavily upon my mind for near a month—The general questions relative to the powers and the process of expulsion under our Constitution had been forced upon me by the situation in which I was placed as Chairman of the Committee on the present Inquiry—My own...
The bill to protect foreign seamen, has been again debated this day, and various alterations in it made—It is less obnoxious than at first, but still contains mischief enough to produce very ill consequences—Duane made his appearance this day to report the debate—The first time for many weeks; indeed I believe the first time since the debate on the Amendment to the Constitution. No other...
I continue as long as possible to send you my gazette; but I now hope in the course of three weeks to leave Berlin—I have written to engage a passage for myself and family, on board the Catherine, Captain Ingersoll; from Hamburg for New–York. No opportunity for Boston occurs from that place; nor do I know of any from Bremen or either of the dutch ports—Besides which the journey from New–York...
I have very much regretted, my dear Sir, that the severity of the Season has deprived us of the pleasure of spending the Sunday with you for so many weeks; but it affords me some consolation that you have found so agreeable a companion in La Harpe, whose work I was well assured would prove a great source of entertainment to you—The volumes containing his account of the philosophy of the 18th:...
No. I. 28th March 1801 Publication Date 6 June 1801 Dear Sir, I send you by this opportunity a French pamphlet, entitled, “ Bacon As He Is ; or, Denunciation of a French Translation of his Works, published at Dijon, by M. Ant. La Salle—By I. A. De Luc, Reader to the Queen of Great-Britain; Fellow of the Royal Societies, of London and Dublin; Member of the Society of Naturalists, at Berlin; of...
During the last days of the Session of Congress which has just expired, I found it impossible to continue the correspondence which I had previously maintained even so far as to enclose from day to day the public documents as they were printed—From 10 O’Clock in the morning untill 7 in the Evening the Senate was constantly in Session, with the interval of only half an hour each day for a slight...
I have already written you a very long letter in answer to your favour of the 8th: instt:—and after writing it, upon reading it over concluded the best disposition I could make of it would be to burn it—Accordingly the flames have consumed it, and I must begin again. Your answers and observations upon my inquiries respecting the impressment of our seamen by the British are of the highest...
The enclosed letter being from Mr: King, I apprehended might enclose one to me, from the gentlemen at Amsterdam; as I had forwarded letters upon your affairs through him to them—I therefore took the liberty of breaking the seal—But finding only open papers within, I now enclose the whole to you—I have not presumed to look into the contents. Yours faithfully MHi : Adams Papers.
As I am informed there is a vessel soon to sail from Amsterdam for Boston I now forward to Mr. Bourne to go by her, this letter enclosing copies of my numbers 2 and 3. upon the Etat de la France &c. The book itself will go with the copy of my first letter concerning it, from Hamburg—Hauterive has generally been given out as its author; but Talleyrand himself is now understood to have had the...
In my last Letter I observed to you, that the form of putting the final question on the Articles of Impeachment against Judge Chase, was varied from that which had been adopted in the case of Mr: Pickering, and made conformable to the English Precedents—To shew you how essentially this variation of form was connected with a most essential important question as to the nature of Impeachment...
I received together last Evening your two favours of 30th: ulto: and 2d: instt: for which I most sincerely return you my thanks.—In the dreary path which I am now compell’d to tread, it is cheering to the Spirits, and gives the most pleasing consolation to have occasionally the benefit of your correspondence.—What the issue of the election in Massachusetts, will be on the harmony of the ruling...
I have two letters from you which ought to have been answered some time since, but I have only one apology for the delay, which I have so often mentioned that I am almost ashamed to repeat it. I have no time for writing except when the Senate is in Session, and when such business is before them, as I can suffer to proceed without paying much attention to it.—We have now come to sit on...
The third chapter of the book upon the State of France, concerns the relative situation of France, with regard to her allies. It begins with a magnificent eulogium upon that country, for her great exertions in former ages against the domineering ambition of the court of Rome, of the Venetian Republic, and of the house of Austria successively. There can be no doubt, but that the efforts of...
Since writing the within letter, I have seen Coll. Smith, who informs me that my Sister will probably have left you before this arrives—So I shall direct the whole to you. My wife has so far recovered that we think of going on this day as far as Elizabeth Town, and hope to proceed further on our journey to-morrow. But She is still so weak, that I am not a little apprehensive on her account—...
When I expressed a wish in writing to my brother, that you should purposely dismiss some part of that attention to the present course of public affairs, which I thought contributed much to make your hours unpleasant, I was not aware that your expectations of change in the politics of a considerable portion of the States, more favourable to the real interests, and morals of the Country, were so...
I have received, and communicated to this Government, my recall from the mission here—I shall hasten my departure as much as possible; but the situation of my wife who is still confined to her bed, renders it uncertain when she will be able to travel at all, and yet more when to undertake the voyage. If a favourable opportunity from Hamburg for Boston occurs I shall give it the preference—But...
I received some days since your kind favour containing the account of your occupations and amusements; and I have this day that of my brother dated at the close of the last and commencement of the present year—I have occasionally forwarded such public documents to you, as I supposed would be worthy of your perusal, together with the Journals of the two Houses—That of the Senate will I hope...
I wrote you a few lines from New-York, enclosing a copy of Commodore Morris’s Defence, for Mr: Shaw—The day after which I left that City and came on multum jactatus mare et terris—to Philadelphia in the Land Stage, and thence to Baltimore by the way of Newcastle and Frenchtown; chiefly by water—a mode of conveyance to me much more agreeable than that of a Stage Coach over the chaotic roads on...
It is my intention during the short time that I expect to remain here, to send you from time to time such new publications in the french language, as may fall in my way, and appear to promise entertainment or matter of interesting meditation for you. With this design I purpose to combine another, which I am at least desirous to render of some utility to my Country.—The translation from Journal...
This prohibition of the admission of slaves into Louisiana, is like the drawing of a jaw tooth—We have expedient after expedient introduced to answer this purpose—Breckenridge has at last concentrated all his wisdom on the subject in the Amendment, which I now inclose you. This is a tolerably good device to reconcile the two parties of slave and anti-slave into which the majority are divided....