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Agreeably to the directions of the two branches of the General Court I have the honor to inform you that you have been this day elected a Delegate from this Commonwealth to serve in the Congress of the United States for one year to commence on the first Monday of November next. I am, / With great Esteem & Respect / Your Honor’s / Very hble Servt. MHi : Adams Papers.
I cannot omit this Opportunity of transmitting to You a Copy of an Act of Congress respecting M r. Temple. It appears to me to be a proper one—In my Opinion our public Conduct should be just and liberal on the one Hand, but firm and decided on the other.— I have the Honor to be with very sincere Esteem and Regard / Dear Sir / Your most ob t. Serv t.
I hereby wish to apprise your Excellency of my Draught of this Date for £200 sg in favor of Mess r Etienne Drouilhet & C o. of Madrid recommended to me by M r Carmichael.—I have nothing material to communicate at present except being upon the Point of Embarkation. Double Usance / N o. 4— I Have the Honor to be / with proper Respect / Your Excellencys / Ob t. Hum ser t
This will be presented, by my eldest Son, who will go from France, to England, early in the approaching Winter, & pass it, in London—I take the Liberty of recommending him,—very particularly, to your Friendship & attention, which I flatter myself he will merit, & experience. I have the Honour to be, with great Respect & Esteem, / dr. Sir /yr. most obedt. Servt. MHi : Adams-Hull Collection.
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Copy of a Letter of the 21 st. December from M r: Temple to me, which I laid before Congress. They have been pleased to direct that you communicate it to His Britannic Majesty—That you inform him, that the Complaint stated in it, being in general Terms, and unsupported by any particular Facts, or Evidence, they do not think it...
I wrote to you on the 7 th: of last Month, and also on the 18 th: of this enclosing some Papers respecting an american Vessel seized at Barbadoes by a british Man of War. I have been honored with yours of 16 th. 25 th. and 28 th. May and 6 th. June last, which with the Papers accompanying them were immediately laid before Congress.— The Situation in which the Want of an adequate Representation...
I take the liberty of writing on a subject, which as it is interesting to Society I hope will require but little apology. & yet, I must be ingenious enough to confess that in my pursuits of this subject, I have not been without a view to my own emolument, in which I have done nothing more than to accept of the invitation held out by many Governments of Europe to engage in the public service...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as...
Congress at length begins to do Business—seven States are represented, and Genl. St. Clair was three Days ago chosen President.— Since my last to you of 17th Ult. I have not had the Pleasure of receiving any Letters from you.— You will herewith receive a letter from Congress to the Queen of Portugal, which you will be pleased to transmit in the Manner suggested in my Report, of which you will...
As you are already informed of Col. Nortons Demand on the British Governor! it will only be necessary for me to observe, that it does not appear to me to be of such a nature, as that it would be proper for Congress to interpose and instruct you on the Subject; and I have Reason to think that it strikes them in the same point of view— As the Col. is an American Citizen, I feel disposed to be as...
One of these Days I shall devote a Leisure Hour to forming a Cypher, and will send it to You by the first good Conveyance that may afterwards offer. at present I am engaged on many Committees, so that my attendance on them and on Congress, keeps me fully employed. I observe with Pleasure that in this Congress there appears to be good Talents & good Dispositions. none of their more important...
We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10 th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as wanted in particular Paragraphs. The...
Since my last to you of 25th. February I have not been favored with any Letters from you.— Congress have made some Progress in my Report on your Letter of 4th. March 1786 and the Papers that accompanied it—They lately passed the Resolutions of which you will find a Copy herewith enclosed. Having been ever since and still being too much indisposed to prepare Instructions for you on these...
private I lately wrote you a few hasty Lines just to as the vessel which carried them was departing; and inclosed and a Pamphlet containing my Correspondence with a M r Littlepage, who was formerly in my Family. The attack which produced that Pamphlet, was not only countenanced but stimulated by some of the Subjects of our good allies here. It is no Secret either to You or me that I am no...
You will be please to Recolect an Execution which you had In the 1769 again Mr: John Rogers In favour of Captn Hopkins on Account of a Note of Hand Given Him by Mr. Rogers Which to prevent The Case’s going into Law I with Mr. Rogers Sighned a Note Jointley & Severally to be pay’d in three Months Which When it Became due Rogers did not pay as He promise Me. You Informing Me that you had Orders...
In obedience to the orders of Congress I have the Honor of informing you, that Phineas Bond Esqr. has presented to Congress a Commission from his britannic Majesty, constituting him commissary for all commercial Affairs within the United States, and another Commission constituting him Consul for the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland.— Congress being desirous...
on my Return two days ago from Jersey, I had the Pleasure of recieving your favor of the 11 Ult.— A sufficient number of Delegates to form a Congress not being at present in Town, it is not in my power to communicate it to that Honorable Body— nor indeed does it appear to me very probable that a sufficient number will be convened during the winter, unless some circumstance of Importance should...
A croud of thanks to You for the pleasure and instruction I have received from your defence of the american constitutions. I have as yet read it but three times, because I wish to forget it a little before I read it a fourth; but I find that impossible: I shall therefore only wait till you give us the augmentation promised. Let me intreat You for the sake of mankind in general and the united...
On the 8 th. of october last M r. Jefferson wrote me a Letter approving of a proposition I had made to him that I should deputize D r. Bancroft to sollicit the Court of Denmark, through the Danish Minister at London, for the Compensation due for the Prizes made by the Squadron I commanded in Europe and given up to the British by the Danish Government, in the year 1779 in the port of Bergen in...
You will recieve this at a Moment, when you will again find yourself surrounded by your amiable Family— it is a pleasing Circumstance, and I congratulate you on the occasion. We are much obliged to M rs . Adams for having honored us tho for a little while with her Company— it has confirmed the Esteem which her Character had inspired.— If wishes were not vain, I should wish you all well settled...
I have been looking out for lodgings, yesterday and this day, and have at length found a bed Room, in the House, where Mr. Smith lodges; and as he intends to go into the Country next week, I shall then take those Rooms which he now occupies. Captain Calohan , is expected every day, and it is very probable that within a fortnight, I shall hear from our Ladies. I have not seen Mr. Stockdale yet,...
Although I have nothing important to say or transmit, yet I cannot let the Packet sail without a few lines for you.— I wrote to you the 31st. of July by Major Sears, and have since received yours of the 16th. June with the Contract mentioned in it—They are on the Table of Congress, but the want of an adequate Representation of the States has prevented any Thing being yet done on that or indeed...
You will receive herewith enclosed a Copy of a Letter to me from the Honorable D. Huger Esqr. a Member of Congress, dated the 2d. April last, together with the Papers that were delivered to me by the Mr. Masters mentioned in it. As that gentleman is seeking Redress in the Course of judicial Proceedings, the Object of his Application to me doubtless is that I may so far recommend his Case to...
Agreeable to the kind intimation you was pleased to do me the Honor of making the last time I was with you, has induced my taking the liberty of troubleing you to acquaint that I am on the eve of my Departure to the East Indies, and God knowes I hope to be of some usefulness to the United States in that Country —if sincerity of Attachment to them can have any influence over the People I am...
I had the Honor of writing to you on the 16th Day of last Month, and now have that of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Duplicate of the Ratification of your late Contract, together with a Copy of two Acts of Congress, Viz., one of the 18th. Day of July authorizing Mr. Jefferson to redeem our Captives at Algiers, and the other of the 12th. Day of October appropriating the Residue of the...
I have been favored with your Letter in which you mention M r Warren. Your opinion of that Gentleman, added to the Merits of his Family, cannot fail to operate powerfully in his Favor. I have communicated that Letter to M r King, an able & valuable Delegate from Massachusets; who I have Reason to think wishes well to you, and to all who like You, deserve well of their Country. our Friend Gerry...
Our distressed Situation on the one Side, and the Many Civilities & friendly regard Which your Excellency bestowed on us on the other , make us So free to implore your Kind assistance: We daily lament of having Sent any goods to America, We cannot get any accounts or remittances ever Since Several Years: and as M r: Cranch wrote us, he would be glad to get rid of the whole business, we...
Having read in the Papers of to Day, an Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in France to one at Boston, mentioning an Edict excluding foreign whale oil, I waited on the minister of France to be informed whether he had rec d . official Information of it. He told me he had not.— we had much Conversation on the Subject, and from it I was led to conclude, that he did not think it improbable that...
I have been prevented from paying my respects to you hitherto by the feeble State I have been in for some time— I am now still further prevented by an operation on my leg.— but I cannot help referring you to a publication intitled observations on a late publication intituled Thoughts on executive Justice printed for Cadell in the Strand & Faulder in New-Bond street—which must please you— if...
On the other side is a Copy of a Letter I had the honor to write you by M r. Bingham the 7 th. of Feb y. last. As I have long expected to see D r. Bancroft here I was led to conclude that he would have been able to give me some satisfaction respecting the application to the Court of Denmark. I find however that he is not acquainted with the effect either of your correspondence to Denmark, or...
Still I am unable to give you satisfactory Information on the old and interesting Subject of your Return. My Report on it is not yet decided upon by Congress, altho’ some Progress has been made in it.—My Endeavours to forward it shall continue unremitted.— My last Letter to you was on the 4th. Day of September, since which I have not had the Honor of receiving any Letter from you. Your Letter...
Your Fav r . of the 20 th . Inst. arrived last Evening— It is not in pursuance of a recent or hasty Resolution, that I am preparing to return: It has been long taken & maturely considered. The public accounts still detain me, for tho’ always kept by M r Carmichael, I do not chuse to leave them unsettled behind me— When that Obstacle ceases, which I expect will be very soon, I shall leave...
I thank you for the loan of the Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, they have afforded me much entertainment particularly those written by Governor Bowdoin on the structure of the Heavens, and on Light; I feel myself happy that my Countrymen are inspired with a thirst after knowledge, and to see them emulating the Nations of Europe in the cultivation of the Arts and Sciences....
I do in the most becoming and with the most due respect, humbly Solicit the favour of your Excellency, for to be informed, if my former letters came to your Excellencys’ hand. If they have come to your hand, I will be glad to have such an answer as may appear to your Excellency, for to send to me, relative to the contents of these letters. Your Excellency may be also assured, that any...
I have been favored with your Letter in which you mention M r Warren. Your opinion of that Gentleman, added to the Merits of his Family, cannot fail to operate powerfully in his Favor. I have communicated that Letter to M r King, an able & valuable Delegate from Massachusets; who I have Reason to think wishes well to you, and to all who like You, deserve well of their Country. Our Friend Gerry...
Having wrote some letters and sent them to your Excellency at London sometime ago and by Post, no answer coming from your Excellency, directed to me, to any of the letters I did send to your Excellency.—I am thinking, I may have been guilty of some impropriety, in sending such letters as I have done, or else, the Address to your Excellency must have been wrong in me. In whatever manner I may...
I am honored with the Letter you wrote me from London the 21 st. Ult. which I receive as a personal obligation. I yesterday mentioned to M r. Jefferson that you propose to begin the Business in question by writing to the Baron de Waltersdorff. M r. Jefferson says the Baron is appointed Governor of a Colony in the West Indies and he beleives is sailed from Copenhagen. I hasten to advise you of...
We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20 th: Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his Friendship as a desirable Object;...
I thank you for the loan of the Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, they have afforded me much entertainment particularly those written by Governor Bowdoin on the structure of the Heavens, and on Light; I feel my-self happy that my Countrymen are inspired with a thirst after knowledge, and to see them emulating the Nations of Europe in the cultivation of the Arts and...
Last night I rec d. your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two Things Viz t. on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no Benefit...
I have been honored with your Letters of the 10th. 19. & 30 April and 1st. May last. Since the sitting of the Convention a sufficient number States for the Dispatch of Business have not been represented in Congress, so that it has neither been in my Power officially to communicate your Letters to them, nor to write on several Subjects on which it is proper that Congress should make known their...
I wrote you on the 7 th: of last Month, and also on the 18 th. of this enclosing some Papers respecting an american Vessel seized at Barbadoes by a british Man of War. I have been honored with yours of 16 th. 25 th. and 28 th. May and 6 th. June last, which with the Papers accompanying them were immediately laid before Congress. The Situation in which the Want of an adequate Representation had...
The rain having detained me from sitting off for the country so early as I intended, I cannot refrain inclosing You a note from Doctor Rush of Philadelphia, in reply to a short one which I wrote to him when by your desire I sent him your defense of the American Constitutions. The essay on American Commerce by Mr T. Coxe; shall be transmitted for your perusal tomorrow. It was read before the...
The enclosed Extracts from the Journal of Congress will inform you of your Appointment to go as Minister to the Court of London, and of M r. Smith’s being elected Secretary to the Legation. I congratulate you on this Event. It argues the Confidence reposed in you by the United States, and I am persuaded will redound to their Advantage as well as to your Reputation.— The necessary Papers are...
This letter will be presented to you by the Hon. William Smith Esquire one of the representatives in Congress from the State of South Carolina whom I beg leave to introduce to you as a friend and a fellow citizen whose talents, integrity, fortune and connexions are respectable in the eyes of his constituents in the district which he represents, and whose family since the earliest settlement of...
I have been prevented from paying my respects to you hitherto by y[thorn sign] e feeble State I have been in for some time—I am now still further prevented by an operation on my leg. But I cannot help referring you to a publication intitled Observations on a late publication intituled thoughts on executive Justice printed for Cadell in the Strand & Faulder in New Bond street—which must please...
The Rev d. Doctor Provost is so obliging as to take Charge of this Letter together with other Dispatches which he will deliver to you.— This Gentleman being elected by the Convention of episcopal Congregations in this State, and having the most express Recommendations from that Body, as well as from a general Convention lately held at Wilmington, is going over to be consecrated a Bishop.—...
Mr. Bourn a Son of your old acquaintance Melatiah Bourn Esqr. has requested me to introduce him to you, he is my Neighbour & a young Gentleman of very good Charecter, after having had a liberal Education he has been some Time in the mercantile Line, in which he has not been very fortunate, I have been much pleased with his Conversation as he appears to have cultivated his Mind & acquired a...
Mr: Copley presents his compliments to M r: Adams, has seen Lord Mansfield and been informed that it is necessary to be early at the House, M r Copley will go with M r Adams and his friends at 12 o’Clock precisely, and shall be glad to know where they are to meet and thinks there will be no dificulty in gaining Admittance RC ( PHi :Dreer Coll.); addressed: “John Adams Esquire”; endorsed: “M r...
Accept my thanks for your Letter mentioning the Marriage of your Daughter, and my cordial congratulations on that pleasing Event.—They who best know the Col l. speake of him as brave and honorable; and Strangers to the Lady draw the most favorable inferences from her Parentage, and from the attention and Example of a Mother whose Charater is very estimable. I sincerely wish my dear Friend that...