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    • Warren, Mercy Otis
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Mr. Warren being prevented by many Avocations from writing this Morning, has put the pen into the hand of his substitute: who with him presents sincere Regards to Mr. and Mrs. Adams. Lets them know they have been Repeatedly disappointed in not seeing them at Plimouth. Shall not pretend to Deliniate the painful Ideas that arise on a survey of the Evils Brought on this much injure’d Country by...
MS ( Adams Papers ) in the hand of Mercy (Otis) Warren. This unsigned poem was doubtless an enclosure in a letter which has since been lost. For Mrs. Warren’s relationship with the Adamses, see Adams Family Correspondence Adams Family Correspondence , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1963– . , 1:84 , note and references there. This reference is not to Gov. Hutchinson’s brother,...
Yours of the 25th. of last month never reached me, till yesterday. It would have given me great pleasure to have seen you when I returned from Salem, and I was really greatly disappointed to find you and Family gone, and more especially as I was Apprehensive I should have no Other Opportunity of seeing you, till the Time called for your Attendance at the Grand Council of America, An Assembly...
The very polite introduction to yours of Jan 3d I Consider not only as A Complement far beyond any Merit I can presume to Claim, but as Resulting in some Measure from that partial Byas which Ever Leads us to View through the most Favourable Medium whatever Regards those we Consider in the Light of Friendship. But when assure’d that I think myself both Honour’d and oblige’d whenever Mr. Adams...
At the same time that I make my Gratful Acknowledgment, for the instructive sentiments and Friendly hint, Contained in yours of the 15th March I must ask your indulgence so far as to Favour me with your opinion (by my son who will Call on you on Monday Next) of the present dark and Gloomy aspect of public affairs. Is there no hope that the Dread Calamity of Civil Convulsions may yet be...
I have had the pleasure of seeing several of your Letters in which you Complain that your friends are Rather remiss With Regard to writing you which I think inexcusable at a time when the Liberties of all America and the fate of the British Empire Depend, in a Great Measure on the Result of your Deliberating for if that Respectable Body of which you are a Member, fails, (Either from want of...
This afternoon came to Hand your Favour of August 26. May you ever have it in your power to expatiate this Largly on your own Happiness, but I would not have you Imagine when you in your sixteen hours Nap and Dreaming of the Feilds of Arcadia, and are Enraptured with the Happy Elisian and paridisaic scenes at Braintree that you are the only Happy Mortal among your Numerous Circle of Friends. I...
I Write again from Waterton, where I Arrived Yesterday with your Excelent Friend who has been so much Engaged by his Necessary Attention to public affairs that he has had time since you Left us only to run to Plimouth four days ago and bring back your Correspondent to this Crouded inconvenient place, where the Muses Cannot dwell, or the Graces of Elegance Reside. Yet the feelings of Real...
The extensive system of policy which must engross your thoughts, and the vast field of business in which you are engaged, is such that I feel some checks whenever I call of f your attention for a moment on anything so unimportant as a letter of mine. Yet I cannot find myself willing to give up the pleasure of corresponding with a gentleman, I hold in high estimation, both as a defender of the...
As your time is so Much Devoted to the Service of the publick that you have Little Leasure for Letters of friendship or Amusement And Conscious of Incapacity to write anything that would be of the smallest utility to the Common Weal, I have been for sometime Ballancing in my Mind Whether I should again Interrupt your Important Moments, but on Reperusing yours of January 8th I find a query...
The sudden departure of the plunderers of Boston and the removal of the Continental troops from Cambridge occasions a temporary calm in the eastern region; but if the storm should again burst upon this quarter, I fear we shall be too destitute of skillful navigators, to oppose its fury with success: though we have still a few left among us whose tried courage and experience has set danger at...
A long abscence from your Native shore would insure a Welcome to a line from me had I no other Claim to your Attention. But when I Can Recur to former Instances of friendship And indulgence, and in addition to that assure you I take up my pen in Compliance with the Repeated request of your Good Lady, I Can suppose it possible that Even the most important Negotiations may for a Moment be...
I Cannot but think myself a sufferer by the Many Captures on American Navigation, for as you are undoubtedly a Gentleman of the strictest Veracity, I must suppose the Watery Damsels that Attend the ouzy Board of the Grey Headed Neptune, are much more Fortunate than the Woodland Dames of America. Otherways, Notwithstanding the Bussy and important scenes in which You are ingaged a folio from the...
This Morning your Vigalent and invariable Friend wrote you a long letter which makes it unnecessary for me to take up my pen nor should I have done it by this opportunity but in Compliance with the Wishes of Him who is so partial as to think it in my power to Contribute to the Entertainment of a Gentleman who (from Interest, from Vanity and from more Noble principles) has such a Multitude of...
I now put a letter of introduction into the hand of a son, who agreeable to your polite and friendly invitation waits on you on his first arrival at Paris. I believe I may venture to say he is a youth, who, will by no part of his conduct, disgrace the recommendations of the friend, or disappoint the expectations of the parent. Yet whoever enters at an early period amidst a world of strangers,...
You Will doubtless hear from several quarters of the arrival of admiral Greavess squadron who anchored of point Judith 4 days since. You have heard from better hands of the present situation of this Country, the Military Manuvers, the political opperations, the Disinterestedness of the Inhabitants and the purity of the Manners. You have been told that the New Constitution has been accepted,...
I put a Letter of Introduction into the Hand of a son who has since unfortunately been made a prisoner by the Portland Man of War, and though held as an Hostage till the fulfilment of Certain Conditions Mentioned in a Cartel sent to Boston, he has been treated with great Humanity and politeness by Admiral Edwards, and by late letters I find he purposes to pursue his Voyage to Europe, and if he...
Mr. Warren directed to you only one week since by Capt. Cazneau bound to Amsterdam, therefore has now left it to me to write one time asking your Care of the inclosed, to a Son for whose Welfare, a Heart so Replete as yours with all the parental affections will not wonder I am Exceedingly solicitous. We have not heard from him since He Embarked at N Foundland on Board the Vestal Frigate, in...
Many Months have Elapsed, and many Great Events have taken place since I took up my pen to address you, among which few are more important to this Country than the Dutch Negotiation, and perhaps None have been attended with Greater Difficulties, and none more Replete with Honour to the prime actors than this. Yet I should not have Ventured to pass my Censure on Its opposers, or to Give...
Did not the stronger motive of friendship Excite, I think the Gratitude due from Each individual of Your Country would be a stimulus sufficient to set the pen in motion. urged by such laudable principles an apology for calling asside your Attention from objects of greater Magnitude is unnecessary. And if I am the last to Congratulate you on the success of your Negotiations I will Venture to...
This will be handed you by a person who will insure the welcome did it come from one who has much less Claim to your Friendship than the writer. at the same time her communications will render any other needless from your American Friends. this therfore is only a line in Testemony of my Respect & Regard. Though if I was to indulge my pen it would be very Expresive of my Wishes for your Early...
I thank you sir for your favour of the 13 th Decmber. I take up my pen to acknowledge it, & to Congratulate you on your Domestic Felicity in the Last Eight months. but shall not direct to you at the pleasant Villa of Auteuil: but to the Court of London, as it is probable before this you & your Family have left the Residence of the distinguished literati of France; perhaps for the Grotto of...
The account of your sons arrival you will have from Himself.— the pleasure his Friends receive from his return you will not doubt, and in Every instance where my advice or attention may be Either useful or pleasing be assured I shall treat him as my own, not only from that long Friendship I have felt for his parents Backed by their perticuler request, but from the affection I dare say his...
While in the silent watches of the Last night I was Contemplating the Vicissitudes of Life, the Fickleness of Mankind & the Instability of human Friendships.— I determined to take up my pen in the morning & inquire if it was possible that M r Adams should never have directed one line to his frends at Milton since he held the Rank of Minister at the Court of Britain. I have been always...
The most of my leasure hours since I have resided on the Hill at Milton have been devoted to my pen. Yet I have never adventured to lay any of the productions before the public Eye. But I have such full confidence in your judgment & Friendship that I now submit to you Either to dispose of to the best advantage or to return by some safe hand a Dramatic Work Composed about two years since, &...
While in the silent watches of the Last night I was Contemplating the Viccissitudes of Life, the Fickleness of Mankind & the Instability of human Friendships—I determined to take up my Pen in the morning & inquire if it was possible that M r Adams should never have directed one line to his friends at Milton since he held the Rank of Minister at the Court of Britain. I have been always...
You Sir, have been so long absent from your native Country that you can scarecely realize its present situation; nor shall I attempt to give you an exact portrait thereof. Yet I will observe the imbecillity of human nature, is here exhibited in as strong a light at this period, as perhaps may be found in any page of history. Emancipated from a foreign yoke, the blessings of peace just restored...
Uncertain whither Mrs. Adams has yet returned from her excursion to N-York I enclose to you: though I do not mean this introduction as an apology for addressing a Gentleman who has received so many marks of unlimited Confidence. I hope never to feel as if anything of the kind was necessary nor do I think I shall unless your continued silence should lay some on my peril. I think one...
You are too well acquainted with the history of the world & the distress of mankind to Expect to stand on the eminence of rank, fortune, and influence without solicitations from various quarters— Where you feel a friendship it will always be a sufficient stimulous for the exertion of every kind office without impertunity: & when applyed to by strangers in distress your benevolence & trust will...
Presuming on the confidential and unremitting friendship that has long subsided between us,--grounded on the close connexion commenced with Mr Warren in the early part of your life,—I again address you, without waiting an answer to my last. According to you usual punctuality, I doubt not that will be done, as soon as the peculiar engagements which have lately occupied your attention, (the...
though the vice president of the United States &, his lady may have forgotten Mrs Warren. yet her former friend Mr Adams will accept a small volum from the hand of their / Sincere & very / Humble Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
An unsealed letter from you came to my hand this day. for the letter I thank you as it contained expressions of regard and esteem which I have been pleased to receive from your pen. for the manner I own myself at a loss— Does not an unsealed letter from you sir appear like a diminution of that Confidential intercourse that long subsisted? and Conveyed warm from the heart the strong expressions...
The painful tidings I have this afternoon transiently heard relative to the health of my long beloved friend Mrs: Adams, induce me to trouble you with a line to enquire what is her present situation, of which you will be so kind as to inform me by the return of the post.—I pray that she may not be in so hazardous a state as is reported, but that her useful life may be protected.— You will...
After a long suspension of a friendly literary intercourse, it was very unexpected to me this day, to receive a letter from the hand of Mr. Adams;—nor can I conceive of any thing that should occasion a resentment in his bosom, or prevent his old style of address to Mrs. Warren, or give the semblance of an “old friend being hastily converted into an enemy;”—much less could I have expected to...
Before I had an opportunity to forward my reply to yours of July 11th: I received another letter under date July 20th containing twenty pages, in which so many demands are made and so many threats denounced, that a total silence might be construed dismay. My thread of existence in this evanescent state is too far spent for me again to enter on political discussion; yet, I think it my duty to...
Your fourth Letter like the preceding ones, discovers a fixed determination to mis-construe every expression of mine, where-ever You, Sir, are introduced in my History of the American Revolution. I am astonished that you should discover so much resentment at a sentence in page 140, particularly at the word mortified. I did, at the time alluded to, think you in a mortified situation. I did...
I know not how to satisfy the demands you make upon my time and patience without entering into discussions, which, at this late day, I have no wish to call up. Yet the chain of your illiberal criticisms still kept up in your subsequent letters, obliges me, however reluctantly, to pursue my remarks. I shall, therefore as leisure permits, attend to most of your paragraphs, exclusive of the...
You begin your Letter, Sir, of August 8th. with complaints of “new demonstrations of Mrs. Warren’s friendship.” Indeed, I cannot see the smallest foundation of complaint from page 229, Vol. 3d. of the Revolutionary History, to signing the Treaty with Great Britain page 232, that could give cause for the smallest umbrage, except the inadvertency of placing the names of Benjamin Franklin and...
At a time of life when retirement is sought for, and the release from all political attentions desired, ten long letters of accusation and reproach, of interrogation and retrospection, within the term of a few weeks, may be designed, not only to distress, but to create passions in my bosom which were never felt nor indulged. When I finished mine of August 15th, I thought I might calculate on a...
I was much gratified by seeing your signature affixed to a Letter address’d to Mrs. Warren.—I am also gratified and obliged by the marks of your attention manifest in the interesting inclosures of yours under date September 1st.—one of which deeply affected me as a Sister.—I have for many years known your respect and regard for a brother so justly esteemed by his connections, his friends, and...
Your Letter of the 24th. Ulto: ought to be early acknowledged by one, who, through a long life has not been insensible of the worth of friendship, or negligent, whenever in her power to cherish the invaluable treasure.—I am therefore, delighted to see our young people strengthening each other in that disposition, which may be a source of happiness to them as they tread over the stage of life...
The sudden death of a very amiable Grand–Son, has involved myself and family in such deep affliction, as prevents me from replying, as I intended this day, to the last mark, of your kind attention, dated the Second Instt.—I thought it my duty to return Governor Mc.Kean’s letter immediately, as requested.—By your permission I took the liberty to have it copied, and may observe upon it, when I...
I doubt not Sir, You will be pleased when I tell You that the Evening of my life is smoothed by the intercourse with a number of sensible, pious, elegant correspondents.—Younger than myself, indeed they are—but there are yet a few left, who stand near the grade of old age as well as myself, though not so far advanced.—It is truly a satisfaction to me to receive letters from a Gentleman with...
It is very many days since I address’d a line to any of my Quincy friends, and as I think I have been some time in arrears for a very agreeable letter from the late President, my first attention is due to desire and I am quickened to discharge this obligation from having recently heard by my Sister Otis, that your health is declining.—The years you have counted up admonish that the harbingers...
Yours my dear Sir, of the 15th Ulto: is in the same stile of partial friendship which I witnessed many years ago.—If the author of the Group ever deserved half the encomiums which you have lavished on her talents, it ought to be rescued from oblivion.—I know of no one living who can or will do this but yourself.—You expressed a wish in yours to have your memory refreshed.—In consequence of...