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    • Warren, Mercy Otis
  • Recipient

    • Adams, John
    • Adams, John
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Warren, Mercy Otis" AND Recipient="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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This will be handed you by a person who will insure the welcome did it come from one who has much less Claim to your Friendship than the writer. at the same time her communications will render any other needless from your American Friends. this therfore is only a line in Testemony of my Respect & Regard. Though if I was to indulge my pen it would be very Expresive of my Wishes for your Early...
I thank you sir for your favour of the 13 th Decmber. I take up my pen to acknowledge it, & to Congratulate you on your Domestic Felicity in the Last Eight months. but shall not direct to you at the pleasant Villa of Auteuil: but to the Court of London, as it is probable before this you & your Family have left the Residence of the distinguished literati of France; perhaps for the Grotto of...
The account of your sons arrival you will have from Himself.— the pleasure his Friends receive from his return you will not doubt, and in Every instance where my advice or attention may be Either useful or pleasing be assured I shall treat him as my own, not only from that long Friendship I have felt for his parents Backed by their perticuler request, but from the affection I dare say his...
While in the silent watches of the Last night I was Contemplating the Vicissitudes of Life, the Fickleness of Mankind & the Instability of human Friendships.— I determined to take up my pen in the morning & inquire if it was possible that M r Adams should never have directed one line to his frends at Milton since he held the Rank of Minister at the Court of Britain. I have been always...
While in the silent watches of the Last night I was Contemplating the Viccissitudes of Life, the Fickleness of Mankind & the Instability of human Friendships—I determined to take up my Pen in the morning & inquire if it was possible that M r Adams should never have directed one line to his friends at Milton since he held the Rank of Minister at the Court of Britain. I have been always...
You Sir, have been so long absent from your native Country that you can scarecely realize its present situation; nor shall I attempt to give you an exact portrait thereof. Yet I will observe the imbecillity of human nature, is here exhibited in as strong a light at this period, as perhaps may be found in any page of history. Emancipated from a foreign yoke, the blessings of peace just restored...
The most of my leasure hours since I have resided on the Hill at Milton have been devoted to my pen. Yet I have never adventured to lay any of the productions before the public Eye. But I have such full confidence in your judgment & Friendship that I now submit to you Either to dispose of to the best advantage or to return by some safe hand a Dramatic Work Composed about two years since, &...
Uncertain whither Mrs. Adams has yet returned from her excursion to N-York I enclose to you: though I do not mean this introduction as an apology for addressing a Gentleman who has received so many marks of unlimited Confidence. I hope never to feel as if anything of the kind was necessary nor do I think I shall unless your continued silence should lay some on my peril. I think one...
You are too well acquainted with the history of the world & the distress of mankind to Expect to stand on the eminence of rank, fortune, and influence without solicitations from various quarters— Where you feel a friendship it will always be a sufficient stimulous for the exertion of every kind office without impertunity: & when applyed to by strangers in distress your benevolence & trust will...