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    • Ward, Joseph
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Ward, Joseph" AND Recipient="Adams, John"
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I wish it was in my power to give you a satisfactory and particular state of facts relative to the late movements in the military way, but all the facts I cannot learn, and if I could they might not perhaps be satisfactory in every sense of the word. The 22 Instant the Enemy retreated from Brunswick to Amboy, a party, of several hundreds, under the command of Col Morgan attacked their rear, in...
The 2 instant at night we began a cannonade and bombardment upon the Enemy, and continued it three nights successively; on the 4th at night we threw up works upon the heights on Dorchester Point. The next morning the Pirates in Boston and in the Harbour appeared to be in great agitation, and every day and night since have been preparing (according to our observations, and the information from...
I have the pleasure to inform you that another Scotch Transport with a Company of Highland Grenadiers on board was brought into this Port by the Privateers on the eighteenth Instant. Each Transport brings a quantity of provisions and camp equipage for the Troops. We have now about four hundred and fifty Highlanders prisoners; they are going into the Country Towns agreeable to the Order of...
Yesterday I came to this place; all things remain much as they were; a few Companies have come in from Connecticut, and many more on their march, ’tis said that two thousand are on their march from that State, and many from Massachussetts. The constant complaint here is, that there are but few troops and the reinforcements come in extremely slow,—which is too true . On my way to this place I...
We hoped to have the pleasure of seeing you again in Camp before you set out for Philadelphia, but as you don’t like a “sleepy Camp” I can easily account for your preferring the Senate. The time perhaps is not far distant when the Camp will be wakeful and active—and to leave us without excuse, I wish we may have a sufficient quantity of the Needful . The Regiments of Militia which were ordered...
Common Minds it is said, are governed more by feeling, than by sentiment; (my only apology for writing) late events are of nature to make deep impressions on minds that saw & acted in Revolution days. To witness pens, as well as tongues, “set on fire of hell,” to remove the Father of his Country from his parental Office, – to see mock patriots, learned cheats, & weak rogues, mingling their...
I beg leave to recommend to your Notice Capt. Price, the Bearer of this, who has commanded one of the Companies of Riflemen in this Encampment; he has supported the Character of a good Officer and a worthy Gentleman; any Services which you may have opportunity to render him, will I apprehend, be serving our Country. We have received an account from Halifax, that great disturbances have lately...
As good men, will be wanted to fill the several Offices under the New Government, I beg leave to mention the name of Major Henry Sewall. He was born & educated in the County of York, a relation to Judge Sewall; he now resides in New York, Engaged in some trade. My acquaintance with him commenced in the Army, when he was an officer in my Department, He served in various capacities, some part of...
This day General Arnold came into Camp, I have had a long conversation with him upon the affairs of the Army, and Navy; his mind is set towards the Seas, and he inclines to pursue his fortune in that line. He thinks he cannot (consistently) act in the Army unless he has his rank, to receive orders from those to whom he once gave orders, appears to him degrading, and contrary to all military...
Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh; Your exaltation, has so perfectly fulfilled my wishes, and gratified the strong feelings of my heart, I cannot suppress the sentiments which it inspires: Having long indulged a belief of “the high destinies of our country,” this event seems an additional omen, and brightens the glorious hope.—The ruling characters of the world have...