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    • Ward, Joseph
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    • Adams, John

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I suppose you have heard we have not taken Brunswick. If any one says we have he belies us. We are however defending ourselves, first against hunger; secondly against thirst; (which often attacks us severely by reason of our heating our coppers, and hard swearing which dries the lungs excessively) thirdly against impertinent fellows who prye into our business, and ask saucy questions, such as,...
Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh; Your exaltation, has so perfectly fulfilled my wishes, and gratified the strong feelings of my heart, I cannot suppress the sentiments which it inspires: Having long indulged a belief of “the high destinies of our country,” this event seems an additional omen, and brightens the glorious hope.—The ruling characters of the world have...
I had the honor to receive your Favour of the 15th of December, for which I beg leave to express my grateful acknowledgements. I never read any thing from your pen, without deriving information and pleasure. You have Sir, I believe drawn a correct map of Bonaparte’s power. I had some similar ideas, but you have measured things by a large scale, and marked the limits of nature. Napoleon, like...
Yesterday a severe skirmish happened between a party of seven hundred of our Troops and two or three thousand Barbarians , it is said we lost forty or fifty and the Enemy more, but the superiority of their numbers obliged our men to retreat; the Enemy advanced and are now encamped three or four miles below Christiana Bridge, with the greatest part of their Troops. These accounts I receive from...
Your highly esteemed favour of the 24 ult. I had the honor to receive. I am instructed by your remarks upon Hutchinson, Hamilton, and other characters, and by your deep sentiments upon finance, the want of a correct History of American affairs, the conduct of England, &c. I admire your candor to Hutchinson. I think your remarks just as well as candid. If he had fortunately escaped the old...
I have the Honor to receive Your Letter of the 6 of April. It is indeed a “grave prospect” which is now presented to this Country But I entertain hopes that a wise national conduct, may soon brighten the scene. The French have long been in a political delirium; but if the Americans exhibit upon this trying occasion that wise magnanimity which is worthy of their former character, I have...
Yesterday the Enemy retreated back to Brunswick; they were followed and fired on by a small party that happened to be near them. Since they came from Brunswick, the fourteenth Instant we have killed about twenty and taken three Officers, three Light Horse, and three or four privates. All is quiet at present. Our Army is reinforced fast, by the New England Troops from Peekskill; and by the...
I wish it was in my power to give you a satisfactory and particular state of facts relative to the late movements in the military way, but all the facts I cannot learn, and if I could they might not perhaps be satisfactory in every sense of the word. The 22 Instant the Enemy retreated from Brunswick to Amboy, a party, of several hundreds, under the command of Col Morgan attacked their rear, in...
I have the pleasure to inform you that we have driven the Pirates out of this Harbour. The thirteenth instant at evening a detachment of five hundred men, with several pieces of battering Cannon and a thirteen inch Mortar, under the command of Col Whitcomb was ordered to take post on Long Island and throw up works, the next morning they began a fire upon the Enemy’s Ships from the Cannon and...
I had the honor to receive your highly estimated Favour of the 7th Inst. Its contents afford me, much information, amusement, and instruction. And convince me more & more that the public mind, and especially our rulers, want information. Your publications in the Patriot may, if they will study them, illume the path of our rulers. But the Sun shines in vain if men will not open their eyes. And...