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    • Van der Kemp, François Adriaan
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Van der Kemp, François Adriaan" AND Recipient="Adams, John"
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I regret, that So often I must wearÿ you with mÿ complaints about myself, and yet I must do it, in apologÿ to myself, when I write a dull Letter. I have again be tortured with head-ache, and enjoÿ now only a little relief, which I am apprehensive Shall not last long—but I must take hold of this interval, to give me the pleasure, of answering your last favour of the 2d inst. I believe, I Shall...
Although I did not hear from Montezillo—Since your very affectionate Letter of 30 May—except by our friend Tyng, on 27 July—I am confident, that I can not be forgotten—and Supposed, that health and contentment must have remained your familys Share, increased yet by the presence of the Secretary of State, and the distinguished progress of your grandson—yet these pleasing contemplations were...
Confident, that, after Such a long Silence, a few Letters of an old friend, who allways revered you, and will continue to do So till his last breath, Shall not be unacceptable, I once more take up my pen I can not—after approaching my 73th foster the hope, that I Shall be permitted to do it often—But I will not delay it longer—as I hear neither from you or my N. England frends a word—except...
Although my health is very indifferent, and my eyes soo weak and dim, that within a fortnight, I could Scarce affect any thing, either by labour or in writing—yet I must indulge the gratification of thanking you, for the few affectionate lines with which your kindness favoured me with. My Physician Says—all will be Soon well—the chief remedies are—abstinentia et quiete.Was your life less...
He published—his opinions on Jus Eccles. Protest . in the Ses—which were—under his presidium—defended publicly by his most eminent Students. This could not be performed without awakening the intolerant zeal of the clergy—Their rage—increased when manÿ of their Brethren Strengthened him with their open Support—then the Church became in danger. Spies—under pious pretexts were Send to him for...
I dare not, no, I will not delay longer my answer to your affectionate Letter, with which I was honoured again—neither my Severe headache, nor bad eyes would not have occasioned it, but, I flattered myself from day to day, to receive tidings from your Dear and estimable Caroline—or her Pastor—but I do not feel any anxiety about that family—as I am persuaded that the Rev. Westbrook would have...
Tu m’aduli, ma tu mi piace says anÿ where Chesterfield—but so you do in a most egregious manner—but you make your Physic so highly palatable, that it is swallowed, before reason can with sufficient coolness examine, if the encomium—so kindly bestowed is really deserved. You want not to be informed—that I am highlÿ pleased, when I am favoured with your encouraging approbation—and whÿ should I...
I have now before me your favour of July the 15th, with which, as usual, I was highlÿ gratified. I could have wished, to have delay’d its answer longer, till the assaults of that relentless Demon of head-ache had been abated, who possesses me again Since three weeks, but I know not, to what charm he will listen—So that I must Submit with resignation, till he is tired of the contest. Indeed...
Once more I must give you my cordial thanks for this proof of your remembrance—not, that I suspected it—but I did not expect so soon an answer. Every one, which I receive every letter of myself—I consider—nearly unwillingly—that it may be the last of our correspondence—continued now since more than forty years—during which—whatever Station you fulfilled—I was allways honoured with your kind...
Yesterday I was highly gratified with your affectionate Letter, and answer it directly, not to renew my thanks, as I can no more express these as lively, as I See it impossible to reciprocate these—and then you dare to ask me, if my residence at Montezillo had been tolerable—did not then my friend read my contentment—in every gesture, in every feature of my visage—then certainly my countenance...