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One among our many follies Was calling in for Steaks at Dolly’s Whereby we’ve lost—& feel like Sinners That we have miss’d much better dinners Nor do we think that us ‘tis hard on Most humbly thus to beg your pardon And promise that another time We’ll give our reason not our rhime So we’ve agreed—our Nem: Con: vote is That we thus early jointly give you notice For as our rule is to be clever...
MS not found. Printed from facsimile in WSS ’s hand in Magazine of American History, with Notes and Queries , [1879], 3:44–45; addressed: “His Excellency John Adams, &c., &c., &c., corner Brooks Street, Grosvenor Square.” The signatures were written in a circle and attached on a separate foldout page. The address was provided only in the Magazine article’s text. Published as “A Diplomatic...
More trouble hangs over the Camp The President last night, indulged The Secretary of War, by consenting to the arrest of Major General Wilkinson—The Court martial is detailed, and dispatches with an official arrest were this morning, sent off from the War office, to the Army of the North—somebody must be sacrificed to cover the blunders of the War— Yours respectfully, MHi : Adams Papers.
The information I gave you relative to M r. Hammonds official Character at the moment of your departure for Philadelphia, you will probably have confirmed previous to the receipt of this— The various important stations I have filled and the particular agency I had in producing this conciliatory advance of the British Court to the Government of The United States, Justifies to my mind the offer...
I received yesterday a Letter from my dear Caroline of the 20th. inst. informing me of the better health of yourself and M rs. Adams, of which, of course I was happy to be informed Heaven grant you both a perfect restoration, and that you may continue a blessing to society and a comfort to your family and friends—The removal of Mr. Granger produces a considerable sensation—and the proposed...
The advances which I was under the necessity of making preparitory to my Journey, & the most extraordinary expences necessarily attending a Journey thro’ Spain & Portugal, together with my expences at this Court, increased by a Severe indisposition, has rendered it necessary for me to draw on your Excellency for one hundred pounds strg. at 30 day’s Sight, you will please to place it to account...
I have your letter of the 15th. inst., the aspect of public affairs become every day more gloomy The slap which I predicted before I left you has been realized, I expected it from the dividing of our force, and knowing that Govr. Provost as an officer, would try a battle of manævre, previous to our troops taking too imposing a position, he tried it and it put a period to the Campaign—The enemy...
It is here a profound secreet of the Cabinet, known only to seven— You may rely upon it a negotiation will be promptly entered into to restore peace between the united States and Great Britain The British Administration, decline the mediation of Russia, but will appoint ministers to negotiate with the American ministers, and express their confidence that all matters, between the two nations,...
M r. Bond delivered your Letter of the 20 th. of april I should have answered it sooner, but I really have been so much occupied in my private affairs, that I have scarcely had time to attend to any of my Correspondents out of the line of real business—but I now have a pretty clear prospect of getting well thro’ the great points I embraced— I shall however, I find, make more reputation than...
I did myself the honour of writing you from Harwich and Amsterdam— we have been very unfortunate as to roads & weather and were not able to reach Bresleau, time enough for the Review there— those of this place and at Potsdam will be finished about the 20 th. when I shall attempt a rapid passage to London by the way of Paris, I shudder at the Idea of tresspassing too far upon your indulgence—...
The brigade, which as Lieut. Col. commandant, I have had the honor to command, being on the point of dismissal, I take the liberty of suggesting, that the officers & soldiers are well instructed in the duties of their profession, & it would be of great public benefit, if as many of them, as might be requisite, should be taken to fill up the corps, government have concluded to retain in...
Your Letter of the 2d. instant contains so many weighty and important questions relative to the jaring points of negotiation in the interior of Europe, that I cannot see how they are to be adjusted and settled You take a wider range and a more expanded view of the immense questions, then I conjecture, has crossed the minds of our political seavans , for myself, from the pictures you hold up, I...
I accidently encountered Mr: Kissam the young Gentleman who came passenger in the last Packet from New York, he having dispatches addressed to you from Mr. Jay, I opened them with an intention if I found anything in them which might be necessary for you to be immediately acquainted with, to have been the bearer of them to Portsmouth but finding they only contained letters of recall dated New...
In your last letter from Quincy of April 4th. you wished I would furnish you with a Copy of Hamiltons Letter to Miranda and asked in what Journal, Magazine, Review or Newspaper it s deposited—At the time, I could only furnish Mirandas Letter to Hamilton, since my return home I have found among my books a Vol entitled South American emancipation a London edition By J.M. Antipara, a Native of...
The Bearer Mr. Mariner, is the son of Capt. Mariner at Rye, whose services during the last war, I took a pleasure in relating to you, and observed that our Country could not boast of a more enterprising and trust-worthy officer, This Gentleman has lately returned from sea and having spent the whole of his early Life in that service, presents himself to The President as a Candidate for a...
I have received the letter you did me the honor to write under date of the 16 th. ins t. —and am content that the communication I thought it my duty to make, has been received—and am also satisfied that it is not new to The President— The report that on my visit to Detroit, I gave out, that I was sent by The President, for ends of Government of some sort or other— is utterly and totally false...
M r: Bourne has this moment waited upon me and informs, that he has been honoured by the senate with the appointment of being the Bearer of their Dispatches to you, relative to your election as Vice President of the Western Empire, upon which please to accept of my affectionate congratulations and of my sincere prayers that Heaven may guide and protect you in this great Career— The Virtuous...
We were pleased by the receipt of yours of the 5th. inst. from Harwich, to find that your jaunt to that period and place had proved so agreable, you have our earnest wishes for its continuance. But we have been apprehensive since, that the fine Sun and fair Brieze which invited you on board in the morning, forsook you before, you had crossed the Channel. At this place, the after part of the...
I have forwarded to you The Report of the Department of war on the subject of our military force the past Campaign I now enclose you Documents from The Secretary of the navy, relating to the navy of the United States—both of which will put you in full possession of the present real state of these two important departments, of course will be thus far satisfactory to you—The House have been for...
The restrictive System is raised and The President this day recommended to The two Houses of Congress to raise the Embargo—The communication was refered to The Committee of foreign relations, who will report to-morrow—The Papers of tomorrow will fully inform you, and I will forward them by the post of the 2d. of april— To make comments to you must be Superfluous, I mark the aspect of the...
I receive with great satisfaction your congratulations on the peace, dated the 22d. ulto. the day of the great rejoicings in Boston, I have noticed the detail of the processions, and ceremonies, they must have been great indeed—The Bostonians have always been remarked, as doing things upon a great Scale. I suppose you did not see, the regular confusion, or hear the enthusiastic shouts of the...
The request I am going to make, will perhaps at the first blush appear singular—this you’ll excuse—If improper—I shall ever acknowledge myself obliged by being candidly told so—and in this, as well as in every other matter, I will chearfully give way to your superior judgement, and regulate my conduct by your advice, as far as you think proper to honour me with it. If there is a probability of...
I have been this day Honoured with your very obliging Letter of the 17th. when I had about half finished the enclosed Letter to the secretary at War in answer to the one alluded to in yours— It gives me pain to learn, that I have from Circumstances inherent in my nature been the cause of anxiety to you. If it were in my power to correct them, I would readily do it, but the fault is in my stars...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your letter enclosing a Copy of one from the Secretary of War, I am fully convinced he is in error—as it relates to myself I am content, but as it relates to the President I am not—The senate & House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled pass an Act to provide an additional regiment of artillerists and Engineers. The...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your friendly Letter of July the 16 th . I supposed, that on your arrival, various matters would necessarily engage your attention; we sensibly feel for the indisposition of our good Mama, and wish she was near us, that we might each take care of a finger,— previous to our being informed of these reasons of silence, we concluded, that there was some...
I have the Honor to inform you that agreably to your Proclamation, of the 6th. of January, recommending to the People of The United States to assemble on the 22d. day of Feby. in such numbers and manner as might be convenient publickly to testify their grief for the Death of General George Washington, by suitable Eulogies, Orations and discourses, or by public Prayer— that the Union Brigade...
An Express arrived last night at 12 oClock from Point look out , advising that the Enemy had entered the mouth of the Potomac with five Ships and one leading armed Brigg, Mr. Granger the Post master General who lives but a few yards from me gave me this information, immediately—an universal alarm in the district took place this morning, what few Troops are here have marched, down the River—a...
You may have seen or heard off a most Violent attack on my Character made by the Editor of the American Citizen—Colonel Troup was the fon foundation of it, if not the Author—as he stood high in society—I addressed myself to him politely and he has swallowed the falshood like a viper. The Editors who gave publicity to the base calumny—I have instituted a suit against as the only mode I could...
Your Letter of the 21st. of Novr. being forwarded under cover to William at New York, remained some time with him and was not addressed to me here, untill I informed him that I should not proceed to Washington, but pause the decission of the House, on the pretentions of Doctor Willoughby, Knowing the complection of the majority and their political biass, I concluded, I would save myself the...
I have the Honor to inform you, that the Union Brigade which consisted of the 11th. 12th. & 13th. Regts. of Infantry, are agreable to your orders disbanded—They have retired from Service, with a dignity becoming Soldiers, in the service of a free and enlight’ned People— There retirement from the field has been without confusion, Disturbance or riot, and meets with the applause of the adjacent...
Yesterday at 1/2 past 5. P.M. The Bill authorising a loan of twenty five Millions of Dollars, passed the House of Representatives by a Majority of forty two—It has been a Subject of animated debate for twenty day’s—it now of course, passed to the Senate, It is not expected that it will long rest there— The Papers which I forward and those you receive thro’ other channels, put you regularly in...
I had the Pleasure of receiving your letter of the 10th. inst. the last evening, and should have done myself the Honour of meeting You at New Rochelle this day were I not kept in check by Mr: Jay’s proposing that if I would wait untill the morning he would accompany me to meet you at Kings Bridge, where we suppose you will be at 12 o.Clock— The Arrangements for your accomodation and that of...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the Commission of Surveyor of this Port by yesterday’s post, bearing date the 24th. Ulto.— Accept of my grateful acknowledgements for this additional mark of your confidence and attention.—I took the oath of office yesterday Noon and shall this morning enter on the duties of the station—You may rest assured Sir, I shall by an attentive examination...
M rs: Smith has shewn me the Letter you wrote on the 2 d. ins t. with the Copies of those you presented to The Count D e Vergennes The extract from Brissots Journal I noticed, and really think there is a greater combination to deprive you of the tribute due to your services, than I ever noticed pointed against any Individual— I think it a duty you owe yourself and Country, to resist it, & this...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the President sent the nomination to the senate yesterday of John Quincy Adams as Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Great Britain— I am Well thank God— Yours Sincerely, MHi : Adams Papers.
The Vice President of The United States is Dead . He Presided in the Senate yesterday, with his usual appearance of Health; this morning took breakfast, and went in a Hack to the Treasury department, after finishing the business which called him there, he observed to Mr. Nourse, that he did not feel well Mr. Nourse attended him to the carriage & he ordered the Driver to carry him to the...
By my Several Letters to Mrs: Smith since my departure your Excellency will have been regularly informed of my progress and the cause of my checks at Paris & Bordeaux and the reason of the length of my Stay here, which I doubt not will prove Satisfactory—I shall proceed on Tuesday to compleat my Journey to Lisbon, from whence if an opportunity offers I shall communicate to Mr. Jay my progress...
I received the enclosed papers yesterday, the importance of their contents, induces me to forward them without loss of time, particularly as Mr. Shaw had told me, when here, that it was understood from the secretary of War, that the Indian Chiefs left Philadelphia perfectly satisfied, these papers will prove to you, that they were highly irritated, they have arrived some time, at Detroit, and...
I take the liberty of introducing to your acquaintance the Bearer of this, Mr. Wm: Langworthy, Author of a much approved work entitled "an Attempt to promote the Commercial interest of Great Britain,” a Copy of which, I believe he presented you with he is a Gent. of Science and abilities, who has been invited to this Country, as a proper theatre for the exercise of his talents and who lately...
I am honoured with your letter of the 4th. inst., I am sorry your friends work you so hard—I will endeavour in the course of the season to visit Quincy, and promise to copy all your letters during my stay, the perusal of them will richly pay me for the trouble. I have a letter from my Brother Justus from the valley, mentioning, that our Brother James is very ill; from the nature of his spring...
The brigade, which as Lieut. Col. commandant, I have had the honor to command, being on the point of dismissal, I take the liberty of suggesting, that the officers & soldiers are well instructed in the duties of their profession, & it would be of great public benefit, if as many of them, as might be requisite, should be taken to fill up the corps, government have concluded to retain in...
Yesterday mr. Eppes chairman of the Committee of Way’s and means, brought in a bill to change the mode of taxation from the capacity of Stills to the quantity distilled eight Cents pr. Gallon on Spirits distilled from domestick materials and 12 Cents on spirits from foreign materials I think this will create serious debates amongst the leaders of the majority, it is supposed this change will...
We the subscribers take the liberty of recommending to your notice and through you to the President of the United States, Colonel William S. Smith of the County of Madison, as a proper Character for filling some important office in the Army of the United States. When we reflect for a moment on the Military talents of Colonel Smith (one of the few remaining heroes of the Revolution) we cannot...
I am under the disagreeable necessity of informing you that Mr: Barclay is in Prison at this place at the suit of Messrs V & P French & Nephew, Merchants Established here, for the Sum of 75.000 Livers—which arises from Cash advanced & Goods Shiped on his account & by his order—near 4 years past—the Gentlemen seem much attached to the Idea, that Mr. Barclay, being in a public capacity—his...
I wrote you on the 24th. ulto. and sent a copy of Hamiltons Letter to Miranda as requested in yours of the 4th. of april last; you will find in the Annual Register, or Review of Politics and Literature for the year 1807 page 45 a note relative to the interest the British Government took in Mirandas Expedition, and in page 206. 7. 8 & 9 the account of his visit to Coro. in page 392 you will...
Inclosed I have the Honor of Submitting two General Orders, that of the 22d. will shew, that I have fully discharged the duties of my military Station, and I once more retire from Service with applause—The other of the 31st. orders me to remain and continue to make and carry into effect such ulterior arrangements as may be necessary untill further orders. It appears to me, it would have the...
I enclose you the United States Gazette to you perfectly acquainted with the Geography of Europe particularly of the frontiers of france, Spain, the borders of the Rhine, and the formerly united Provinces of Holland the details of military movements, may amuse you and perhaps produce some observations, instructive to me. I must acknowledge myself somewhat perplexed in my calculations, on past...
I should have long before this answered your affectionate Letter of Congratulation on my return to my family and friends but since my arrival, I have really been so perfectly and fully engaged, that I could scarcly call an hour my own— I had hurried myself for this week past in expectation of attending M rs: Smith to Braintree, but the situation of my public and private business tho’ agreable...
This day’s Post brings a communication from Abbey under date of the 13th. from a Gentleman of very high standing of from which the following is an extract— “General Hulls trial will be terminated in a few day’s, the evidence on the part of the prosecution have closed, The Unfortunate Old man, will have but a slender Defence, the Court must I think sentence him to be shot, the state of the Army...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance Mr. Blodget, tho’ I believe you may recollect seeing him in London—he will present himself to the President being charged with the prosecution of a plan relative to the building of the fœderal City, he is a young man of great property and supported in his project by most undoubted security, he will if you give him an oppertunity communicate his...