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I enclose to you a small essay which I consider as a full reply to that part of your letter which defends the latin, and Greek languages.—I shall class them hereafter with negro slavery, & Spirituous liquors, & consider them as equally unfriendly tho’ in a less degree to the progress of morals—knowledge, & religion in the United States.—In a few days I shall reply to Other parts of your...
I enclose you a small publication which contains an account of a new auxillary or palliative remedy for madness. It will serve perhaps be acceptable to some of your medical friends. You will I have no doubt amuse yourself and your fire side by wishing that it could be applied for the relief of napoleon,—George the third, and all the mad federalists & democrats in our country.— From Dear Sir /...
Yrs. of June 21st. came safe to hand. I shall reply to it give you the echo of it in a few days. Not knowing to whom it is proper to send the enclosed packet from Lord Bircham, I have taken the liberty to address it to you. It contains (I suppose) a curious, heterogeneous oration by his Lordship delivered before some Americans in Edingh: on the Anniverrsary of General Washington’s birth day.—...
Wealth, respect and friendship! from your grateful and affectionate friend. War with the “great hammer of the whole earth” to use the words of which the prophet Jeremiah applied to the king of Babylon, is now the order of the day in Philada.— MHi : Adams Papers.
In Contemplating the facility with which our Once chaste & vi mistress “American liberty” admits embraces of some of the most profligate and unprincipled men in our Country, I feel disposed to address her in the Words of the Song. “I loved thee! beautiful and kind, And plighted an eternal vow, So altered are your face and mind, ’Twere perjury to love thee, now. ” MHi : Adams Papers.
Lancaster, 8 February 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:199–200. Detailing some of his charges against Dr. Shippen, Rush complained that his alleged personal resentment was the congress’ excuse for not removing the director general of hospitals; therefore, “to restore harmony,” Rush felt...
“Great men (says Lord Bacon) have neither Ancestors nor posterity.” This, you and I know is not the case with Writers. The enclosed pamphflett pamphflet is a proof that the passion for pen, ink and paper has descended in my family. It is written by my son Richard, who requests you will do him the honor to accept of a copy of it. Health, respect & friendship from / ever yours MHi : Adams Papers.
“salus, honor et bonus Appetitus.” to use the Words of Molière— from Dear sir ever / Yrs MHi : Adams Papers.
“Arma, Cestusque”, parmamque “repono,” upon the offensive subject of one of my late letters to you.— I sincerely rejoice in the successful issue of the operation upon Mrs Smith’s breast. I would reciprocate your expressions of pleasure upon the appearances of a recussitation of the Spirit of 177 4 at Washington did I believe they would terminate in any thing but in upon Speeches, Embassies...
From the early Attachment of most of the gentlemen whose names I mentioned in my former letter, to Independance, I have little doubt of that Subject being talked off with great Affection in our return from Point no Point in the year 1775.— In consequence of the Contents of your last letter, I shall make no material alterations in your political Character. But I must hasten to the principal...
I enclose you four numbers of Duane’s paper. They contain a good deal of matter relative to the dispute between our Country & great Britain. I have not read a column of it, but it excites general attention in our city, and of course is probably worth the notice of a Man who has not, like myself, outlived his patriotism. My wife, Uncle Mr Boudinot and his daughter it is said, have lately paid a...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...
Yorktown, 22 January 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:190–192. Whatever might be said about the graces needed at the French court, Rush praised the choice of the “perfectly honest” Adams as commissioner. Critical of American generalship, Rush yet dreaded the entry of France into the war...
Every moment of Amusement that I am able to afford you, is an Addition to my happiness, for which reason I send you from time to time all such numbers of Duanes papers as contain any new Speculations upon the state of our Country.—The enclosed, is I suppose of that nature, for I have read its title only. Have you seen Sillimans travels int o England, Scotland & Holland? They are gener ally...
The reduction—I will not say loss of Charlestown has produced a new Era in the politicks of America—Such as you and I saw—and felt—and admired in the years 1775 and 76. Our republic cannot exist long in prosperity. We require adversity, and appear to possess most of the republican Spirit when most depressed. The papers will inform you of the exploits of our governments—of our citizens—of our...
The difficult and complicated labors of my professorship consisting of teaching, examining, reviewing theses &c &c being now nearly over, I sit down with great pleasure to pay my epistolary debts. You are my largest, and most lenient Creditor. The first dividend of my time of Course is due to you. I concur with you in your reflections upon the Western insurrection, but not altogether in your...
When a young man I read Sidney upon government. In one of his Chapters, he agitates the following question—“Whether A civil War, or slavery be the greatest evil” and decides in favor of the Latter. In ing and revolving that Subject in my mind, I have been led to suppose there are evils more afflicting and injurious to a Country than a foreign War. The principal evil of War is death. Now Vice I...
I have been so long accustomed to regard all your opinions upon government with reverence, that I am was disposed upon reading your last letter, to relate suspend my belief in republican systems of political happiness; but a little reflection led me again to adopt them, and upon this single principle, that they have never had a fair tryal. Let us try what the influence of general science &...
Your letter of August 1st is still unanswered. It is full of truth, and useful information and reflections. I regret that my son did not state the impressment of seamen being in 1807 an Act of the British Government. It would have obviated One of the Objections to the War by the Minority in Congress. Our Country is divided into two great parties called Fedarists and Democrats. The former are...
Although for many years past I have read nothing, but books upon medicine on week days, & upon Religion on Sundays, and have expected to continue to do so as long as I lived, yet you have almost persuaded me to read Fox’s history of James the Second. Your praise of it is enough for me, for I know how much your habits of reading and thinking qualify you to judge of the merit of books that...
Your two letters of yesterday & to day have made me serious. They discover a profound knowledge of times past, present & to come. I have directed one of my daughters to copy two sentences from your letter of this day to be sent to my son Richard at Washington who, poor fellow! is swamped in a beleif of the infallibility and perpetuity of the “powers that are”. I know he reveres your judgment....
Herewith th r ough the politeness of Mr Quincy you will receive the Coins for your son. I regret that some of them are not recently coined. None such have been issued lately from the mint. Your Son Thomas’s friend Mr Erving has paid me for them. Permit me to Congratulate you upon your Son John’s honourable Appointment to a Seat upon the bench of the United States. It gives great Satisfaction...
Act 1. Scene 2nd. Mr Adams alone in his Study. Enter B Rush. A: Aye Rush is that you? What is that paper you hold in your hand? R A Summary view of the physical, moral and immoral effects of certain hymns upon the body & mind of man & upon his Condition in Society. Permit me Sir to request your Acceptance of it. A What must I do with it? R: Send it to the parson of your parish, but if he “too...
I began a long & confidential letter to you two weeks ago upon the Subject of one of your late letters, but an unusual pressure of business has prevented my finishing it. Judge of my the nature & extent of my engagements, when I add, that after lecturing twice, and visiting my normal number of patients this day, and entertaining some of my pupils at tea, I have since written six Answers to...
I have seldom been more highly gratified than by the receipt of your letter of Novr 11th. The latter part of it accords perfectly with Opinions I have long cherished. You may see a short account of those Opinions in an Oration delivered before our Philosophical Society upon “the influence of physical Causes upon the moral faculty” published in the first Volume of my Inquiries. They shocked for...
An inflammation in my eyes which for several days has confined me to my house, and rendered writing difficult and painful, must be my Apology for the Shortness of this letter. I admire the Correctness of your history of the ten talents committed to the Subject of your letter. Upon the talent of his taciturnity Mr Liston gave me the following Anecdote, “that he was the only person he had ever...
Mr Jefferson and I exchange letters Once in six, nine or twelve Months. This day I received a few lines from him in which he introduces your Name in the following Words. After mentioning the Visit paid to you by his two neighbours—the Messrs Coles last summer he adds, “Among Other things he [Mr Adams] adverted to the unprincipled licenciousness of the press against myself—adding— I always...
I return you Col Smiths & Dr Waterhouse’s letters The former is replete with good Sense. Alas! the evils of party Spirit! It is a greater Curse to our country than our War with Great Britain. It sacrifices every to itself . Unless appointements are made hereafter with a more wise and impartial hand, our Union cannot last. I am afraid the app situation in the medical department of the Army...
Accept of my thanks for your last letter.—I enclose you a few numbers of the Aurora. Shall we descend in a Calm or a storm to the our Graves? We are told your son is gone to Petersburg to put a torch to the flame of War, and that we are to be Allies of France and of all the powers on the Baltic in it. Mr Jackson has just left our city. He has been visited & entertained by Some of our first...
I have escaped for ten minutes from the pressure of business, lectures–pupils, and the Charge of the Pennsylvania hospital, to drop you a few lines which I beg you will consider as the preface only of a longer letter a few Weeks hence, when I shall be relieved from three fourths of my present labors. Our Citizens are making great preparations for celebrating the birth day of the first...
You have so far outdreamed me in your last letter, that I shall be afraid hereafter to let my imagination loose in that Mode of exposing folly and Vice.—My whole family was delighted in contemplating you upon your rostrum in the Garden of Versailles, and in witnessing the effects of your Speech upon your hairy, featherd and scaly Audience. Let it not be said “De republica America fabula...
Your affectionate and instructing letter of Decemr 2nd. did not reach me ‘till yesterday. I Embrace with my Affections, as well as my judgement that form of Government which you have proved from so many Authorities, to be the only One that can preserve political happiness. It was my attachment to a constitution composed of three branches, that first deprived me of the Confidence of the Whigs...
All my family rejoice with yours in the happy issue of the operation performed upon Mrs Smiths breast. The enclosed letter is intended as an answer to her’s to me, and to serve the further purpose of exciting in her a belief that her Cure will be radical & durable. I consider her as rescued from a premature grave. Since my last letter to you it has pleased God to make all my family very happy...
My printer and my patients have kept me So busy for some Weeks past that I have fallen in Arrears to all my Correspondents. I Sit down with pleasure to discharge the first debt of that kind to my old friend of 1774. In my publication upon the diseases of the mind I have carefully avoided the Subject of the possessions in the New testament, also the Controversy about the nature of the mind. I...
In One of my letters written some time ago, I informed you that my eldest son had killed a brother officer and a friend in a duel at New Orleans. The distress and remorse which followed this event deprived him of his reason, and threw him into the marine hospital where he has been nearly ever since the duel. In the month of Feby: last he arrived in Philada in a state of deep melancholy &...
My son Richard who has been a customer for the Aurora ever since he lived at the Jersey College, after reading your last letter, brought the enclosed papers from his office, and requested me to forward them to you. I have lately met with an account of the brain of Voltaire being preserved by a Lady in a France, and showed to her friends as an object of affection and adoration. The author of...
Accept of my congratulations upon the Success of your negociations at the Hague. Your countrymen are not insensible of your Zeal and industry in effecting the important event of a connection with the States of Holland. Our hearts vibrate with the hearts of those honest republicans whose petitions and memorials opened the eyes of their rulers to acknowledge our independance. The tories...
You may tell your friend Mr Cranch that I included my Correspondent among the men who were so prominent in madness as to undertake the Cure of the madness of mankind by Appeals to their Reason. I have been a fellow labourer with you in this irrational business. But we will console ourselves with the comfortable reflection that we have aimed well. Were we to live our lives over again, and...
Altho’ we differ in our Opinions About the Latin and Greek languages, and some Other matters of perhaps less consequence, yet we both agree in the propriety & duty of rewarding old & faithful servants of the public. Mr And: Brown who will have the honor of delivering you this letter belongs to that class of worthy citizens. He goes to new york to Solicit an Appointment Under the federal...
Your favor of the 19th. of February was alike acceptable with all your former letters. The papers will inform you that our government is about to yeild to the Clamors of your part of the United States against the Embargo laws. Had our Legislators been better historians they would have promptly saved their honor, and preserved the peace of our Country. Augustus repealed a law to compel...
I am now Attending a daughter of Mr Mathew Careys. In One of my Visits to her, I mentioned your Opinions to him upon the Subjects of a Navy, and your documents upon the Subject of its Origin in the United States. He requested a Sight and Copies of your letters containing those Opinions & documents for a publication which he expects Shortly to issue from his press. I said I could not comply...
I put the papers you sent me into the hands of Mr Carey. Some of them will be published in an Appendix to his history of the rise, and progress of the American Navy.—They shall all be returned to you in a few days.— I rejoice with you in the 5th: Naval Victory of our Country. The year 1812 will I hope be immortal in the history of this World for having given the first Check to the overgrown...
Herewith you will receive a small publication that contains several new Opinions in Physiology, and which admit of being applied to the cure of several diseases. If you have no inclination to read it, please to put it into the hands of your family physician. He may probably pick up something from it that may be the means of lessning the pain, or preventing the mortality of a disease in your...
Your favor of Sepr. 20 from Amsterdam came safe to hand. The contents of it were of so important a nature that I took the liberty of publishing them in our newspapers. They were known from the republican and liberal Spirit of the sentiments, to be yours, and were well received by the public. I am happy in finding that your once unpopular name, now gives weight to opinions and measures not only...
Alas! What a difference between your last, and former letters!—Instead of being charmed with the effusions of your vigorous highly cultivated Understanding and sportive imagination, your letter of the 2nd of Novr contains nothing but accounts of “graves & tombs” and “dust converted into paper,” and of “sorrows written with rainy eyes upon the bosom of the earth.”—It affected me in the most...
I am much pleased with the Specimen you have given of the Use of your Wings upon a certain Subject in your last letter. Your publications in the newspapers show still further how important to the public, to posterity, and to your family honor are the words you have preserved of your political life. Your defence of the rights of our Seamen is much admired. It discovers with the Experience &...
My son Ben sent me a quarter Cask of Old muscat Wine as a present from the Isle of Samos. The Vessel on board of which it was sent, to avoid Capture put into Boston where her Cargo is to be sold. I have requested Messrs Walley & Foster merchants of Boston to deliver it to your Order free of all Costs. I beg your Acceptance of it as a small Mark of the gratitude and friendship of Dear Sir /...
In a situation such as you have seen a Sea Captain in a Gale of Wind, I sit down to acknowledge the receipt of your two last instructing letters. Present events will justify your opinion of the present measures of our rulers. Your Account of the pernicious influence of a belief in the time in Which the prophesies are to be fulfilled is to much opposed to the System of the divine government...
Accept of my sincere congratulations upon your arrival in New York, and upon your advancement to the second honor in the United States.— Your influence in the Senate over which you have been called to preside, will give you great weight (without a vote) in determining upon the most suitable characters to fill the first offices in government. Pennsylvania looks up with anxious Solicitude for...
Ever since the receipt of your last letter I have passed my days like an arrow shot from a bow. At a time of life when (to use an expression in one of your letters written to me soon after your return from England) “nature sighs for repose,” I live in a Constant round of business, which employs both body and mind. Even my studies (the times for which are taken from family Society or Sleep) are...