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    • Rush, Benjamin
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Adams, John"
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“Arma, Cestusque”, parmamque “repono,” upon the offensive subject of one of my late letters to you.— I sincerely rejoice in the successful issue of the operation upon Mrs Smith’s breast. I would reciprocate your expressions of pleasure upon the appearances of a recussitation of the Spirit of 177 4 at Washington did I believe they would terminate in any thing but in upon Speeches, Embassies...
Your letters are full of aphorisms. Every paragraph in them suggests new ideas, or revives old ones. You have given a true picture of parties in our Country. We have indeed no national Character, and however much we boast of it, there are very few "true Americans" in the United States. We have four distinct parties in Pennsylvania. 1. old tories. 2. honest federalists. 3 violent democrats. 4....
From the early Attachment of most of the gentlemen whose names I mentioned in my former letter, to Independance, I have little doubt of that Subject being talked off with great Affection in our return from Point no Point in the year 1775.— In consequence of the Contents of your last letter, I shall make no material alterations in your political Character. But I must hasten to the principal...
I enclose you four numbers of Duane’s paper. They contain a good deal of matter relative to the dispute between our Country & great Britain. I have not read a column of it, but it excites general attention in our city, and of course is probably worth the notice of a Man who has not, like myself, outlived his patriotism. My wife, Uncle Mr Boudinot and his daughter it is said, have lately paid a...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...
Yorktown, 22 January 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:190–192. Whatever might be said about the graces needed at the French court, Rush praised the choice of the “perfectly honest” Adams as commissioner. Critical of American generalship, Rush yet dreaded the entry of France into the war...
Every moment of Amusement that I am able to afford you, is an Addition to my happiness, for which reason I send you from time to time all such numbers of Duanes papers as contain any new Speculations upon the state of our Country.—The enclosed, is I suppose of that nature, for I have read its title only. Have you seen Sillimans travels int o England, Scotland & Holland? They are gener ally...
All the Coins are in readiness; and Subject to your order. At present no Opportunity of sending them to Petersburg offers from our city. Shall I send them to you by the post, put up in such a manner as to be mistaken for a small book? or will you request any one of your friends now in Congress to call for them on his way to massachussets next month? I have no Objection to the reading the dead...
Few events have happened since the 17th of Septemr: 1788, which have afforded more pleasure than your election to the Vice President’s chair. It is the cap–stone of our labors respecting the new government. Mr. Rutledge had some friends in Pennsylvania—but your friends prevailed. Mr. Wilson had great merit in this business. Mr. Morris likewise advised it. There is an expectation here which I...
I enclose to you a small essay which I consider as a full reply to that part of your letter which defends the latin, and Greek languages.—I shall class them hereafter with negro slavery, & Spirituous liquors, & consider them as equally unfriendly tho’ in a less degree to the progress of morals—knowledge, & religion in the United States.—In a few days I shall reply to Other parts of your...