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    • Dalton, Tristram
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    • Adams, John

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The enclosed Packett to the Honle. Doctor Franklin, contains Papers relating to the Loss of the Brigantine Fair Play, which Vessel was sunk, last Januy., by a Battery, on the Island of Gaudaloupe. The Particulars of this unhappy Misfortune, whereby Eighteen Men perished, together with the Steps taken in Consequence, You’ll find in these Papers, which I beg the Favor of your perusing—afterward...
This week honor’d me with Your kind favors of 23d Febry. last, for which acknowledge myself much obliged. With respect to the Vessel sunk in the W Indies, I took the liberty to address You, in July, from Boston—when the Owners, supposing your public important Commission not to permit any particular attention to such private business, forwarded to the Honble. Mr. Dana every paper they thought...
I beg leave to intrude upon a few of your important moments, in behalfe of William Armstrong, late commander of a letter of marque Brig, belonging to me, and called, the little Porga ; which vessel was captur’d the 3d Nov. last by a Cutter Privateer, belonging to the Island of Guernsey—whither Capt Armstrong and his company were carried, after being stripped almost naked, according to the...
Under the 25th May last I did myself the honor of addressing you in behalfe of a Capt William Armstrong, late Comander of a vessel belonging to me—who, by the then last accounts, was suffering a severe confinement on board a Ship at Portsmo. I felt much on this account, both as he was a worthy young fellow—and as it appeared to me an insult upon a subject of these States—therefore on a public...
I esteem myself greatly honor’d by the receipt of your Favor’s of the 18th August last—and much obliged by the attention paid to my request respecting Capt Armstrong who, soon after my writing, returned from a severe confinement, having made his escape—of which I immediately advised to prevent any further trouble in that affair. You express yourself at a loss, Sir, to know, to what...
I embrace the first opportunity, for Europe, to acknowledge the honor of receiving your much esteemed Letters of 28 th August & 23 d Decem 1782, and to congratulate you, in the most affectionate Manner, on the complete Success with which your Labors have been crowned— The glorious Terms of Peace that the United States of America have obtained, do really fill the Minds of the People with...
Under the 26 th last April, I did myself the Honour of addressing you, being most sincere in my Congratulations on the happy Issue of the several Important Negotiations, which had been entrusted to your Care— With ardent Pleasure the People of this Commonwealth contemplate your expected Return this Fall— The highest Honor They can confer awaits you in the Spring— This Sentiment is not founded...
I did myself the Honor of writing You from Boston, the 16 th Ult o , and endeavor’d to give a general State of our public Affairs. Having retired to my Country Estate since the Adjournment of the General Court, which was a little before the date of my last, I have not had opportunity to acquaint myself of the present Sentiments of the people at large on the several Matters that had agitated...
By two Gentlemen who went in Ships bound for London, and of whose arrival in that City accounts are received, I had the pleasure of writing your good Self under the 16 th July—& 8 th August 83, both which Letters I hope reached you safe, and found you in health— As far as time or observation permitted, I gave a sketch of the politics in this Government—and wish the present day afforded a...
By my friend Jon a Jackson Esqr. who sailed for Ireland and England in Dece r last, I did myself the pleasure of writing you fully, under date of the 5 th of that month; and on the 26 th I had the honor of receiving your Favors of the 8 th Septem r preceding— Accept my sincere thanks for the confidential advice therein contained; which has been prudently, & I think very beneficially,...
I cannot omit paying my most sincere Respects by your good M rs Adams—on whom and your amiable Daughter attend my best prayers— it would have given me great Satisfaction to have offered them my Compliments, personally , before their sailing for Europe, Which I am deprived of by leaving Town this Evening— May the Winds be propitious and every blessing be theirs— I have had the pleasure of...
I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your kind favors of the 4 th Septem r. and partake in the happiness of your being “at length settled in a regular Train, both of public & private Life”— While the Nation, of which I am a Citizen, will receive the greatest benefit from your labors in the former line—permit me to hope that the remembrance of an old friend may, now & then, afford...
Under date of the 21 st Decem, of the last Year, I did myself the honor of addressing You; since which time I have not had the pleasure of receiving any advise of your good Self or esteemed Family, except by enquiry from some of their near connections—who, with me, regret their personal loss in not hearing oftener; tho’ they submit to the consideration of the great importance of your every...
The enclosed letter, of the 11 th Instant, was intended by a Co ll Norton, whose unexpected departure deprived me of the favorable opportunity— Since that date some transactions have taken place in this Town, which may be mispresented on the other Side of the water—and which I wish, when stated in a true light, would reflect more honour on the wisdom and temper of the Inhabitants—indeed, I...
I am honored with your esteemed Letter of the 5 th March last, and congratulate You on your appointment to that Court, where it was so much for the interest of these States to have a Minister— In my last letters of the 11 th & 19 th April, I attempted to give You some account of the Spirit of the People in this part of the Continent, on account of the unequal trade between the U States and G...
Under date of the 21 st July, I had the pleasure of addressing you; since when I am honored with your letter of April 26 th. forwarded by your good Son—who has obliged myself and family by passing a day with us here, in company with his neice Miss Cranch—& some friends from Haverhill— I was much pleased with your Son— He frequently brought full to my Mind the Days of our Youth—and— caused an...
Under the 18 th of last October I did myself the honor and pleasure of addressing you, com̃itting the Letter to the Care of Doctor Gordon, who since tells me that He put the same into a safe Channel of Conveyance— I hope you received it in due time—as I therein acknowledged the Satisfaction given to me and my family, by your good & worthy Son, who had passed a day with us—and was the bearer of...
Under the 18 th of last October I did myself the honor and pleasure of addressing you, comitting[expansion sign] the Letter to the Care of Doctor Gordon, who since tells me that He put the same into a safe Channel of Conveyance—I hope you received it in due time—as I therein acknowledged y[thorn sign] e Satisfaction given to me and my family, by your good & worthy Son, who had passed a day...
This morning has honored me with your most esteemed favors of the 26 th May—for which be pleased to accept my sincere thank[s—] All on this side of the Atlantic, who speak of the affairs of these United States, joyn in the Opinion you express, “that they must soon take a turn for the better or become much worse—[ ” ] Most of our Citizens appear too unconcerned, falsely supposing that they now...
This morning has honored me with your most esteemed favor of the 26 th May—for which be pleased to accept my sincere than[ks.] All on this side of the Atlantic, who speak of the affairs of these United States, joyn in the Opinion you express, “that they must soon take a turn for the better or become much worse— Most of our Citizens appear too unconcerned, falsely supposing that they now sit,...
The accounts received of the votes given for Vice President of the federal Senate render your Election to that high Office undoubted—Will you permit me to Congratulate you on the occasion, tho’ premature? not only because I wish to express my earliest Joy, which is sincere—but that I may, in season , propose accompanying you to New York—if your arrangements should make it convenient to you— A...
Among the many Congratulations that will be presented to You, on your being elected to the high & important Office of President of the United States, permit me to present mine—I pray You not to accept them as offered to the Shrine of Power only, but as proceeding from the Heart of Friendship& the Soul of unfeigned regards— While our Country shall thus express their Gratitude to, and Confidence...
In offering to You my Congratulations upon your being placed at the Head of the Government of the United States, by the suffrages of a free and enlightened People, it would be in common with those who have, or who take, Occasion to address you— In doing this I should but reiterate the sincere Sentiments which I did myself the pleasure of expressing in my last of the 16th January—when the Issue...
Under the 26th of March last I did myself the Honor and Pleasure to address You—and to present my sincere Congratulations—and respectful Regards— At that time I took the Liberty of mentioning some circumstances relative to this City—and to the competition excited between the Proprietors of the different parts of it, and of the Lands around—and the baneful Effects of their various movements— In...
I had the Honour of receiving, in course of Mail, your much esteemed favor of the 1st Ult. and pray You to accept my sincere Thanks for this renewed Mark of Friendship— As it did not require an immediate answer—and as nothing of a publick Nature had occurred in this Quarter, worthy particular Notice, I deferred interrupting your much more important avocations by a repetition of my Let ters ....
Mrs. Dalton desirous to pay the Compliments of the Season to her much respected Friend Mrs. Adams, I take the Liberty of putting under Cover, with this, a Letter to that Purpose—adding Mrs. D’s request that you will be so good as to pardon the Freedom. It affords me an Apology for troubling yourself with my best Wishes, on the same Occasion—I should have highly enjoyed the Opportunity of...
Sensible how important every Moment of your time must be, I will rely upon the intention of my present Address to You as an Excuse for this Intrusion— You have been pleased to express a wish that I would give You any information that I judged worthy of Notice—Very few incidents in this quarter are so, especially relative to public Movements— If being impossible for You to be ascertained of the...
I lately did myself the Honour of addressing You, relative to a certain Character—whose Conduct, since, I hope had justified my intruding upon your important Moments, on such an occasion. The large Majority in the House of Representatives for granting pecuniary Aid to this City, is pleasing to those particularly interested in it—It did me good to hear of any tolerable Union in that Body, on...
I would not have so soon again trespassed upon Your important Moments, did not the publick coincide with my private interest, on the present occasion. Both of them connected I hope will plead my Excuse. In your serious Message to Congress of the 19th Instant, I observe that, among other measures to prepare for the Worst, You have recommended “replenishing our Arsenals, establishing Founderies,...
I should have acknowledged the Honor of your much esteemed Favor of the 30th—March last, immediately on the receit of it, but for an unwillingness to intrude so often upon your all-important Moments, with the mention of my personal Atffairs— and Feelings,—being, however, clear that You do rest assured that the latter, toward Yourself, are most respectful, as well as most friendly— Your...