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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Thomas Boylston" AND Recipient="Adams, John"
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My time has been so occupied between going to Boston to get my dinner and coming back to Quincy again, that I have written to you but once since my arrival. I should have considered these frequent visits as time lost to improvement, but that they have enabled me to attend the Session of the Supreme Court, which commenced on the 19 th : ult o. Having now complied with all the necessary forms of...
Your kind Letter by my Brother was delivered a few days since; as the proposal it contains is of very considerable importance, I have taken time to consider it before I returned an answer. As you have been good enough to leave it in my option whether to adopt the plan, or not, I shall express my sentiments with the freedom which your indulgence seems to authorize. I am sensible that a young...
I received in course your favor of the 4th: instt: a pretty assiduous attendance at Court, during the whole of the last week prevented my making a sooner acknowledgment. Two causes of considerable moment were argued very elaborately, an outline of which may be found in the Gazette of the U.S. of the 16th— The question of war or no war, as it respects the relative situations of the United...
There is in Boston, a Lemmon-tree of a peculiar kind, called the Sweet Lemmon, Sent to your Grandfather, by a gentleman from Malaga—and I expect it will be in the custody of our friend Mr J H Foster, by Tomorrow. Your Grandfather is desirous of presenting this plant to the Botanical garden, in Cambridge, and wishes you to call on Mr: Peck the Professor, with his compliments, tendering the Tree...
Your favors of the 24th: and 27th: ulto: are duly received. It seems not to be understood here, whether the proceedings; in Senate; relative to the Convention, are conclusive, as to the fate of that instrument, or whether, under any pretext, the discussion can be revived upon it. I am, myself, unable to Solve the question, though I have some idea, that the rejection of the particular,...
Your favor of the 10th: instant and that of the 12th: ult: on the same subject claim my thanks. I find in the journals of Congress for 1774 to which you refer me, the best clue to the investigation, and I shall avail myself of copious extracts from the documents therein exhibited. There is a remarkable uniformity in the expressions used by the Constituents of the first delagates from the...
I have received your favors of the 17th: and 19th: instants and take the first moment of leisure, that has occurred, since their receipt, to acknowledge gratefully these fresh instances of parental solicitude respecting my personal concerns. I shall reply without reserve to your last letter, which relates more immediately to my professional prospects. I have always been persuaded of the...
Your two letters on La Harpe, I have taken the liberty to publish in the Port Folio, and I have now to ask the favor of you, as your leisure & inclination may serve, to pursue your extracts & comments upon any portion of that great work, which you may find agreeable or think useful. I make this request in behalf of the Editor of the Port Folio, who will be flattered & obliged by any literary...
The morning after you left this place, the Aurora was filled with five columns & an half, from T. Coxe; wherein he undertakes to detail another private conversation, which passed between him and Mr. Dennie, during his last visit to the City, & while he lodged in the same house with Dennie & myself. It is hardly necessary to observe, that this, like all other details from the Same Source, is...
I have searched, in conformity to the request expressed in your favor of the 2d: instt: all the writers upon the law of Nature and Nations, which I have in my Office, for authorities to support & justify & explain, the Sixth article of the Convention with France. The extracts from Vallet in your letter are somewhat more explicit on the particular point in question, than his masters, Puffendorf...