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    • Adams, Samuel
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    • Adams, John

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There are two great Objects which I think should engage the Attention of Patriots here, & which appear to me to involve every thing else—to preserve entire our political Liberties, & to support our National Faith. To effect either of these Capital Ends, we must counterwork the Designs of Great Britan, who to say the least does not appear to be our most cordial Friend, by her Emissaries amongst...
The Governour of this Commonwealth will transmit to you Copies of Letters which lately passed between him and Capt Stanhope Commander of the British Ship of War Mercury. This is the same Person, as I am told, who, when a Prisoner here in the early time of the War, was not too delicate in Point of Honor to break his Parole. The Governor however had treated him from the Time of his Arrival with...
I received several of your Letters with Pleasure, particularly that of May, which I will answer at a Time of more Leisure— Capt n Dashwood of this Town is going to London, to sollicit Payment of the British Crown, for Goods taken from him when the Troops left the Town, not as forfeited, but under the Apprehension that they would be of Use to our Army, & with an Express Promise that they should...
Before this reaches you, you will have heard of the Arrival of near an hundred more of the Enemies ships. There are too many Soldiers now in Philadelphia waiting for Arms. Is it not of the utmost Importance that they should march even without Arms, especially as they may be furnished with the Arms of those who are sick at N York. Would it not be doing great Service to the Cause at this time if...
If you have had Leisure to commit your Thoughts to writing agreable to my Request I shall be oblig’d if you will send them by the Bearer. The Govr says the House have incautiously applied a Rule of the Common Law (see the 4th Coll. of his Speech). The Assertion is mine , upon your Authority as I thought. If it be vindicable, pray give me your Aid in that as briefly as you please. I am sorry to...
Doctor Gordon is to deliver you this Letter. He is going to the Land of his Nativity, wishing for the best Happiness of his own Country & ours and hoping that mutual Affection will be at length restored, as the only Means of the Prosperity of both. As he determines to spend the Remainder of his Days in the Country where he was born, what rational Man who considers the Ties of human Nature will...
I have already written to you this Day by the Marquis de Lafayatte. This passes thro the Hands of Count de Noailles whom you did me the Honor to introduce to me. I duly acknowledgd the Receipt of your Favor which he brought me; but the Loss of my Letter was attended with an infinitely greater, that of Collo Palfrey. I wrote to you largely by him. The Son in Law of one of our good Friends has...
I cannot omit the Opportunity of writing by Monsr de le Etombe who is going to France & will take the Care of this Letter. You must not expect it will be a long one. There are many Things which I wish to say to you, but the Tremor of my Hand is so increasd that I am put to Difficulty to guide my Pen. Our Merchants are complaing bitterly that Great Britain is ruining their Trade, and there is...
Or may it plese your Excellency, I imbrace this oppertunety to address your Excellency: it is from a kinsman tho a little remote I am the oldest son of Ebenezer Adams grand son to the Reverend Joseph Adams of Newington your Uncle decest; may these lines find your Excellency and family: in helth and happiness injoying the blessings that divine providence has bestowed upon you in placeing your...
Doctor Gordon is to deliver you this Letter. He is going to the Land of his Nativity, wishing for the best Happiness of his own Country & ours and hoping that mutual Affection will be at length restored, as the only Means of the Prosperity of both. As he determines to spend the Remainder of his Days in the Country where he was born, what rational Man who considers the Ties of human Nature will...