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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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The enclosed letter from Mr. Bache, the post-master at Philadelphia, ought, I think, to be communicated to the President of the U.S. As it is not improbable that an application for pardon, in the case alluded to, may follow him, on his tour. Taking it for granted that, some channel of communication between him and your department, during his absence, has been settled between you, I have...
Inclosed is a letter, and an account from Mr. Gales for the National Intelligencer— I am very loth to trouble you—and I must beg the favour of you to pay Mr. Gales his account and take his receipt and his Certificate—My subscription is stoped—for I hereby request, and Order, that it may be stoped—for I never read it—I am overwhelmed with a Cart-load of Newspapers for which I never...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mr Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my subscription for the national Intelligencer I beg your Pardon for not answering immediately your letter of the 24th of last Month as I ought—Not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—Till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant visit—And tendered me the two...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mrss Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my Subscription for the National Intelligencer— I beg your pardon for not answering immediately your letter fo the 24th. of last Month as I ought—not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant family visit—& tendered me two...
I have enclosed to the President a letter from Dr Waterhouse. I wish you would ask to see it. Between you and me I suspect that our friend Eustace has been of no service to Waterhouse. Ancient Jealousies of him among professional men in Boston may have left some traces. But as this is mere conjecture I lay no stress upon it. Whether any thing can be done for him consistent with the public...
Our dear Shaw, who ransacks his Atheneum and the litterary World to afford me Amusements and Instruction, two evenings and one day in a Week, brought me on Saturday your Welcome letter of the 22d of May. The true cause of the infrequency of letters between You and me is a conscientious principle on my part. I know that you would answer every Scratch of a pen from me; but I k n ow the...
The Citizens of Princeton, having been informed of your intended visit to that place, embrace this opportunity of manifesting their respect for your person and Character and their gratitude for your distinguished Services in the responsible stations to which you have been called, by meeting you on this occasion to express to you the assurance of a cordial welcome— We rejoice in this...
If a Sense of duty did not compell me to address You with these few lines, I could not deem it proper to intrude on your more Serious occupations—but—where, perhaps, it might afford you an opportunity of doing good—even in attending to the duties of your High office, I trust, I Shall not need an excuse for this interference by the Secretary of State—while I am too well informed of John Quincy...
By the frendship, with which I was gratified and honoured by your Beloved Parents’—during the best part of my life, and which I yet continue to enjoy unabated—By the courtesy with which you obliged me—voluntarily, and by your Literary endowments I feel my Self Sufficiently justified, in Submitting to your examination sundry paper—although I know that your High Station, your more Serious...
The voice of the Nation call’s you home. the Government call you home—and your parents unite in the general call to this Summons. you must not, you cannot refuse your assent, nor will you, I presume have a disposition to regret so honorable an appointment, as is assignd to you; by so unanimous a vote— It is now more than four months Since the News papers from all parts of the united States,...
A new Administration has commenced, Mr Monro’s inaugural Oration you will See in the Newspapers. It Seems to be popular. Even Ben Russel Says there has been nothing like it Since Washingtons Administration. If there is any Faith in the Government or any Sincerity in the People, you are appointed by the former, and are elected by the other Secretary of State. My Advice is to accept it without...
I write you a few lines in addition to what I have already written, and inclose you the Copy of a Letter from mr Otis to your Father, by which you will learn that your Nomination as Secretary of State, was confirmd, with one only dissenting vote, just sufficient to save you from the war. whose it was I neither know or care for no president since Washington, has been chosen by the people, with...
I will teise you no more, at present, with Metaphysicks or Books. I expect with Something very like impatience, once more to embrace You and the dear Creatures about you, meaning your Wife and Children. One Star Sitts with brilliancy, and another rises with brilliancy, notwithstanding certain Spots, which you and I have had opportunities to observe. Mr Monroe has certainly had the good Fortune...
Lieutenant John Percival of the Navy of The United States is about to embark for London, and from thence to the other maritime Powers of Europe upon business of importance to Navigation and consequently to Humanity. The Subject is a new Invention of an eliptical Valve Pump, which if I understood it, I must not explain. I earnestly recommend him to your Attention, as much as possible; though I...
Your Letters are always Common property with the Family to hear from you, and know that you are all well, is a mutual gratification to us all—Your Father is not so punctual in acknowledging Letters, dates and numbers as you are, so that your last Letter to him of Janry 14th No 56 is left for me to notice, and laugh, at your excuse for its brevity. I have received several from you of the like...
I will write to you again, and untill I learn from you, that you have taken your passage home.—I have now to acknowledge a succession of Letters from you, arriveing nearly all together No 106. No 107 No 108 No 109 No 10010 and No 111 March the 16th which is the late date— I hope you did not think, when I wrote to you pressing your return to America, that my object was the office to which you...
Yesterday was one of the most uniformly happy days of my whole long life. The Morning brought Us a Letter from our Friend Crafts of your Arrival; in a few hours our Neighbour Beal brought Us a Newspaper confirming it, and the Evening presented Us your Letter to your Mother of the 6th. that you were Landed “All well”. A thousand Circumstances exalted the delight or as West used to Say upon all...
Through the kind of attention of mr Crafts we learnt yesterday morning of the arrival of the Washington, and in the Evening, through our watchfull centinal Harriet, I received the gratefull intelligence under your own hand, that you were Landed and all well for which joyfull News to your parents; God be thanked—we now wait, in pleasing expectation of welcoming You; one and all, to the old...
I may now congratulate you on your Arrival at the Seat of our national Government: yourself your excellent Lady, all your Friends relations and domesticks, are We hope, in good health. Your Interview with the President; to whom present my affectionate respects, So Soon after his Arrival must have been very agreable to both. As the Endemic dissentary is not yet abated your oldest Son is with Us...
Mr Jefferson has been good enough to Send me the enclosed Pamphlet An history of the restoration of Royalty in France 31, March 1814 by De Pradt. As it has Some pretentions to Authority, and as you may not have Seen it, I Send it to you: and as the owner desires me to return it, I pray you after you Shall have read it to transmit it to Monte Chello, with whose Inhabitants I hope you will have...
The president has thought it Safe for the Students to assemble at Cambridge upon fryday last, and George has followd yesterday. we Shall miss his Society much. he has been company for his Grandfather Since Louissa has been Sick—I hope he is properly imprest, with the necessity of arduous application—John and Charles appear to like their Preceptor very well and perform their lessons I am told,...
I have not acknowledged your 5. & 7 Octr. We have had another delightful Family Scene. Madam De Wint her Son your Nice with two of my Great Grand Children and to finish the Picture Mrs Clark all arrived in perfect health. On the 83d 25th Octr. We all drank “All our Friends and Connections of every generation”. “Now lettest thou, thy Servant depart in peace” has been So hackneyed that I will...
I must, as long as octogenarian infirmities will permit, Send you a line to prove to you my continued Vegatation Peter Heigne’s Mother, when the News arrived of her Sons glorious death arrived , Said “Peter was always running about, and She always expected he would come to a bad End.” Washingtons Mother used to Say that “George would be like the Pitcher which after going So often to the Well,...
Captain James Riley politely Sent me his travels in a handsome volume which I read with interest, for, though it abounds in the Marvellous and sometimes aproaches the miraculous; yet excruciating Sufferings and a Strong imaginaleo may apologize for So much of it as to leave enough of it credible to make it an entertaining affecting and instructive Work Inclosed is a letter from him, on a...
The disapointment of the Anglomaniacs and the Antigallicans, who are the same persons, on one hand, and of the Gallomaniacs, Antianglicans and Hyperdemocrats who are all the same people, on the other: in the Choice of Mr Mason a Sound untainted American Republican, for the Representative of the Suffolk district, will give that Friend of yours an Opportunity to present you this letter. This...
The Father of Mr George G. Barrel, Still living at 85 his Uncle Joseph and one or two more were once well known to me and esteemed. You will find the Bearer So intelligent and So correct that if you have time to converse with him you will find pleasure and Information. Though I presume not to give any Opinion upon this Application or any other; Yet I will venture to Say, that the Pretensions...
Nature did not make me of a jealous disposition; but a dismal experience has made me Suspicious of myself, not less than of others. I often Suspect myself, and that my Imagination deceives me; that I mistake posibilities for probabilities and Non Entities for probabilities; that I See “ Au dessous des cartes ” many things which in reality may not be there. Masons and Austins are Old South...
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of a set of documents, and the second Volume of Wheaton’s reports stiched in boards, which have been sent to me by the department of State.— And to be with high respect / your most obedt. servt. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
As you accused me last Evening, or rather Night with preventing the Ladies from writing to you; I apologized by saying that I had a Letter written to you at home,which was really the case. I made a Fairy visit to Washington last night, in which time I visited mrs Munroe, mrs Madison &c, and meeting you and mrs Adams in the street, in fine Health and Spirits, you accosted me as above—I was too...
Your favour of the 21 has excited my Sympathies, visible and irascible. I never had the Shadow of a Shade of doubt that you was my legigtimate Son. But if I had been afflicted with Jealousy, the frank confession in your Letter of your impatience with Barrel would have cured me. For never were two Peas parching in the Same fire more alike. This however is no laughing Matter. If there is any...