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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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M r Richard Cooke of Mary land will tell you all the News— I expect to sign the Bills this day which were all passed Yesterday for carrying into E xn. the Treaties with Great Britain Spain Algiers and the Indians— Yesterday seemed a Day of Universal and perpetual Peace foreign & domestic. Tomorrow I go home— Congress will rise by the 20 th. There is much Talk of the Resignation of the P. a...
I received with great Pleasure your Letter of the 9 of August, inclosing a Receipt from Mr Parsons for one hundred Pounds lawful Money, which you paid him in the month of August, Second day, in full for your Tuition as a Clerk in his office for the term of three Years. I learned, with Pleasure also, that on the 9 th of August you took Possession of an office in my house, where I wish you more...
I have great Satisfaction in your Letter of the 10 th. The Breaking of the Bubble of Banks would be a Blessing if it could teach our People to beware of all other Bubbles. But I fear We shall have a Succession of them. I hope however at least they will teach you caution. “The Rivalries of our most conspicuous Characters” are such as human Nature produces under the Cultivation of such a...
I wrote you before to day: but I forgot to say Several Things.— Have you ever attended a Town Meeting? You may there learn the Ways of Men, and penetrate Several Characters which otherwise You would not know. There are Several Objects of Enquiry, which I would point out to your consideration without making any noise or parade about them. 1. The State of Parties in Religion, Government Manners,...
Agreable to my promise of the 29 th of writing to my beloved friend once a week I now contrary to etiquette enter upon the pleasant occupation— Surely you will acknowledge—when I tell you you are indebted to me four letters I have amply compensated for my former omission— I have vainly expected to hear from you but the winds are unfavorable in a word every thing seems to conspire— I will only...
How shall I answer my dear friends last charming letter where find words adequate to the pleasure I experienced at reading it the idea of your returning almost compensates for the pain I felt at parting— Yet shall I confess fears arise which never presented themselves before. When I reflect upon the part in life I shall have to act with the little I have seen of the world my conscious...
This day compleats Ten weeks, since you sailed and I have had no opportunity before this, by Captain Scott, of writing to you, unless by way of Amsterdam, where I have little hope of finding you. The Arms of France have proved so powerfull, and their victorys have been so rapid, that I should not be surprized to learn, that they had renderd your commission Nul & void, by overturning the...
I received by your Brother on fryday last your kind Letter; he did not get here, oweing to contrary winds untill the tenth. he appears to think of the Law, but I fear it is rather from necessity than inclination, and because he finds that his Father is fond of having him study it, and that he does not See any opening in any other buisness. I shall be better able to judge when your Father...
Sunday last brought to hand your invaluable letter of the 6 th shall I confess I was nearly too much elated to know what I read having vainly flattered myself from the intelligence I previously received of your immediate return but alas how delusive is hope how was I disappointed to find you might not return till the Spring. You ask my permission to come here Oh my best friend you already know...
Prince will bring this to you; the inclosed Letters I wish you to direct, the thin Paper, to your Father The other to Thomas; Prince is to return on thursday morg̃ by him send the papers and any Letters which you may have; if the weather should prove pleasent, I shall send a Horse for you on saturday. I have seen the dr since I wrote to you, and talkd with him about the meddow. he thinks that...
I have rec d your Letters in Succession to N. 9. I think inclusive but they are in So much request in this Country that I can never keep them long enough to make regular Answers to them. The Last appeared to me of Such Consequence that I Sent it to The President to whom I have communicated all of them I believe or all but the first, from London. I have Reason to think that your whole...
As we have some skitish persons in the Family who are apprehensive of the small pox, and of every Body from your infected city, we shall not have the pleasure of your company, nor the office a visit from you this week. your cousin Lucy informd me to day that you had a letter from your sister. pray send it me or such extracts from it as will inform me how she does and the col and Boys. I am...
I, Yesterday rec d your favour of June 27. N o. 10. It is in common with all the Numbers which preceded it, full of accurate Information, profound Sagacity and nice discernment. I sent four of your preceeding Numbers to the President, who wrote me on the 20 th of August that “they contain a great deal of Interesting matter and N o. 9 discloses much important Information and political...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of Several Letters from You Since Your arrival in London, the first Nov br 24 th Jan ry 6 th Feb ry 23, and Yesterday I received Yours of March 20th, for all of which, accept my Thanks, and believe that they are to me a most Valuable Deposit. The desire You express, that no warmer encomium may be bestowed upon You; than a bare approbation, may restrain my pen,...
In its due time, I received your Letter from Philadelphia of the 27. of July. Although, in the Opinion of The Secretary of State, the Mission to Holland may be “almost exclusively reduced to a pecuniary Negotiation,” yet, in the Opinion of others among whom your father is one, the Post at the Hague is an important Diplomatick Station, which may afford many opportunities of acquiring political...
I rec d by the last post your favour of the 16. The Votes from New Hampshire to Maryland inclusively have been unanimous excepting the factious Voice of New York, and one D r Johnson of Conecocheague formerly a New Yorker a Particular Friend of M r Clinton and by his own confession under particular Obligations to him. Southward of Chesapeak all are for Clinton except S. C. I thank you for your...
When I was at Bush Hill this Morning it was my intention to have requested your Company to dine tomorrow at the Presidents, by his desire; but as I did not see you at that time it slipped my recollection, and occasions you the trouble of this letter, which is to make the same request—to which you will be kind enough to give an Answer by the Servant. I am Dear Sir Your most Obedt Servt ALS ,...
Your favor of the 13 th came to hand on the 26 th. by which I find that you had not determined on the time of your departure or the Rout you should persue, tho you say you should prefer that by way of England if you are permitted & a Passage in a Neutral Vessell could be obtaind to carry you to your destination; I donot know the propriutory or Impropiutory of your comeing this way, therefore I...
I have sent you the Cloth the coat & Boots. the Glass I have not yet been able to find. inclosed is an other article the amount of what I engaged to you. The Horse I had engaged to keep for a Gentleman till Monday next, so that I could not without forfeiting my word let him go till twesday provided I should not sell him to him. I am sorry, for if I should not part with him then: I should not...
Your Letter of April 27 was put into the Post office at New York and I have neither seen nor heard of M r Dorr nor M r Jones. It is probable they found a Conveyance for their Letters in the ship which carries our Envoy Extraordinary and their Journey to this Town became unnecessary. I should have been glad to have seen them and I suppose they might have obtained their Request without...
Two vessels are notified, one for England, the other for Hamburgh. I will write by both, but the pleasure and freedom of communication, is much damp’d by the restraints of Station, and the apprehension of Capture. It is now several Months since I took my pen to address you. I believe my last date was in December. I have since written largly to Thomas, but fear my Letter is still waiting a...
The Note from Piemont, I would not have Sued by any means. Hopkins’s Pretentions I have no Idea of. I Suppose an account with him may be found in my Ledger, But I can Say nothing upon memory. Piemont ought to make out his Account— He says I had a Bar Wig and a Bob Wig of him. If so he should make out his Account and if they amount to as much as the Note, there is an End of the Business. If...
I have rec d your favour of the 22 d I believe it is, and am glad to hear that the People of Boston are disposed to Stand firm on neutral Ground. Much will depend upon their Stability. There are so many Interests constantly contriving to draw Us off, from that Position, that if Boston should fail Us We should be in great danger. I feel for the Sufferers under the Unexampled depredations of the...
The Public Papers will inform you that M r Jefferson has resigned and that M r Randolph is appointed Secretary of State. The Attorney General is not yet nominated. M r Lewis M r Lawrence M r Benson M r Gore, M r Potts &c have been mentioned in Conversation. The Motives to M r Jeffersons Resignation are not assigned, and are left open to the Conjectures of a Speculating World. I also am a...
Tis a very long time since I wrote to you, or heard from you I have been more engaged in company than is my choice but living in Town has necessarily devolved more of it upon us than heretofore, and tho we have not seen more than in reality we ought to considering our publick Character, yet it is much of an Egyptian task, and fall some times much heavier upon me than my state of health will...
I inclose to you your Brothers Letter I should have Sent for you last saturday but I expected a snow storm. I suppose your Father has written to you. he is vex’d with the Printer for Publishing in three Numbers what ought all to have been in one. he says the writer of Columbus had better publish in a pamphlet by which a printer may get money, and as pamphlets are much in vogue at present....
I have this morning received your favours of Jan. 7 and February the first with the Newspapers for which I thank you— I rec d some days ago a Letter with the Review and some other Papers. I thank you for all these Marks of your kind Attention. a few Lines from you are always acceptable as they are Information of your Health and Situation, but your long Letters are fraught with such Information...
I wrote to you by Captain Scott Some time in December. on the 14 of the Month Captain Joy arrived in Boston, after a passage of 63 days. by him we learnt the agreable News of the arrival of the Alfred, in a passage of 32 days. to know that the ship was arrived, was a relief to my mind. to have heard from my dear sons, would have been a cordial to my Heart, but the Gen ll Lincoln was comeing...
I am informed of a Vessell to sail for England soon and I have been too remiss already not to embrace this opportunity of writing to you— I had the pleasure to hear from you soon after your arrival— but since that time I have been indebted to our Parrents and Charles for information respecting you— but I am so conscious of my own deficiencies that I cannot complain of yours— nevertheless I...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...