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By your old Acquaintance M r Hall, who is bound to Europe I shall Send you Some Newspapers, which will give you a general View of the Complexion of our Public Affairs. Upon Meeting and conversing with the Members of Congress I find that although there will be Noise there will be no Serious Evil this session. The Treaty if it comes back ratified by the K of G. B. will be Supported and executed...
I have this morning received your favours of Jan. 7 and February the first with the Newspapers for which I thank you— I rec d some days ago a Letter with the Review and some other Papers. I thank you for all these Marks of your kind Attention. a few Lines from you are always acceptable as they are Information of your Health and Situation, but your long Letters are fraught with such Information...
M r Richard Cooke of Mary land will tell you all the News— I expect to sign the Bills this day which were all passed Yesterday for carrying into E xn. the Treaties with Great Britain Spain Algiers and the Indians— Yesterday seemed a Day of Universal and perpetual Peace foreign & domestic. Tomorrow I go home— Congress will rise by the 20 th. There is much Talk of the Resignation of the P. a...
After a tedious Session of Congress, rendered uncommonly disgusting by the obstinacy of a Party in the House of Representatives, I had an Opportunity of Signing a Bill for the appropriations necessary for the Treaties with Great Britain Spain Algiers and some Indians and then asked and obtained Leave of Absence— Here I am, so absorbed in the Embraces of my Family and my rural Amusements that I...
I have many favours in Letters, Newspapers, Pamphlets and Books to thank you for, the latest of which were dated about 20 th of May— And I have many prosperous Events to congratulate you upon—your Promotion to Portugal and for what I know your Marriage by this time. I rejoice in every Thing that promotes your Honour and felicity— But whether you will relish Portugal, I know not. However bitter...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...
I know not where to find you—Whether in Holland England or Portugal—Whether to address you as a married Man or a Single one. And I am equally at a Loss what to write to you. one thing I am at no loss to say that your Letters have continued up to N o. 23. inclusively to delight and inform me, and that I beg you not to be discouraged from continuing your favours, by my Remissness in Writing Our...
As I came through New York, where I found your Sister and your Brother and their families in good health I rec d your Letter N o. 24. and upon my arrival here, presented it to The President together with the preceeding Numbers to 19 inclusively. I dined with him on Saturday when he returned me the Letters, with an Eulogium. He Said that “Things appeared to him exactly as they do to your son”...
M r Murray of Maryland, your old Friend, with whom you form’d your first acquaintance at the Hague is to Succeed you. That Gentleman has been So long a Member of Congress and has given Such Proofs of Talents, amiable dispositions, and patriotic Sentiments, as qualify him to do honour to the Mission, as well as to his Predecessor. It would have been enough to have Said that he is well chosen to...
The Newspapers had informed Us of your Marriage, but the first Evidence of it from yourself, was in your Letter to your Mother of the 29. July.— I congratulate you and your Lady on this Event, which I hope will be for your mutual Happiness and the Comfort of all the Friends of both Parties, for a long Course of years, dedicated to the Public— And may the Blessing of God Almighty be bestowed on...
It was only Yesterday that I received your No. 44 of 22. July though I had rec d N o. 45 a few days before. When I nominated you to Berlin, your Mother had not rec d the Letter in which you mentioned your aversion to holding an office under my nomination. If I had known you had formed Such a resolution I should not have made any Alteration in your destination till I had written you on the...
The inclosed Letter from the sec. of state will go by the Way of England. In the paragraph quoted from me I wish you not to mistake. I dont mean that I have any aversion to a Treaty with Prussia or sweeden, upon Terms consistent with your Instructions. You may agree to such a Treaty as soon as you please. But in the present State of Things, if the Neutral Powers will not go to War with France...
I have received and read with great Pleasure your Letter: but having lent it to Col. Humphreys I cannot now answer it so particularly as I wish.—I thank you for it and desire the continuance of your Observations and Speculations in the Same Way. You have quoted a Poet, much to the Purpose: I wish to know whether it is Shakespear, and where it is to be found.—I would not wish you to be...
I am not willing you should want Information from the Seat of Govt: but I can do little more than Send you a Newspaper. This Day twelve months I first took the Seat in which I now Sett, and I have not been absent one Moment, when the Senate has been Sitting, excepting one Day when my own Salary was under Consideration. This Confinement will injure my health, if I cannot Soon take a Journey. Mr...
Know all Men, by these Presents, that I John Adams of Quincy, in the County of Norfolk, in the State of Massachusetts, Esquire, in Consideration of Twelve thousand Eight hundred and Twelve dollars paid me by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk, and State aforesaid, the Receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give grant Sell and convey unto the Said John Quincy Adams...
Inclosed is a letter, and an account from Mr. Gales for the National Intelligencer— I am very loth to trouble you—and I must beg the favour of you to pay Mr. Gales his account and take his receipt and his Certificate—My subscription is stoped—for I hereby request, and Order, that it may be stoped—for I never read it—I am overwhelmed with a Cart-load of Newspapers for which I never...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mr Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my subscription for the national Intelligencer I beg your Pardon for not answering immediately your letter of the 24th of last Month as I ought—Not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—Till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant visit—And tendered me the two...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mrss Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my Subscription for the National Intelligencer— I beg your pardon for not answering immediately your letter fo the 24th. of last Month as I ought—not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant family visit—& tendered me two...
I have enclosed to the President a letter from Dr Waterhouse. I wish you would ask to see it. Between you and me I suspect that our friend Eustace has been of no service to Waterhouse. Ancient Jealousies of him among professional men in Boston may have left some traces. But as this is mere conjecture I lay no stress upon it. Whether any thing can be done for him consistent with the public...
Our dear Shaw, who ransacks his Atheneum and the litterary World to afford me Amusements and Instruction, two evenings and one day in a Week, brought me on Saturday your Welcome letter of the 22d of May. The true cause of the infrequency of letters between You and me is a conscientious principle on my part. I know that you would answer every Scratch of a pen from me; but I k n ow the...
It grieves me to think how long it is since I have written you a Line. But public Affairs are forbidden and private are indifferent or disagreable. Your Sister and youngest Brother have given me much Pleasure this Winter by their Company: but at the same time have exalted a Strong desire to see you and your best Friend my amiable Daughter, your Wife. A Being who has violated a Trust committed...
The 11th. of September is reckoned among the happiest days of my Life. The Navy Officers who composed the late Court Martial on Capt. Little came out to visit me, with Mr Shaw who brought me your favor of the 4th dated at Philadelphia, informing me of your arrival on that day with my Daughter and Grandson in as good health as could be expected—You do not expressly say whether you intend to...
I have been confined, with a cold for three weeks and the family have been generally affected in the same way: We have not heard from yours for some time. I long to see you all: but the Weather and the roads will keep us, at a distance I fear for some days if not weeks. I have read Seven Volumes of De la Harpe in course, and the last Seven I have run through and searched but cannot find what I...
We feel, my dear Sir the Want of your Society on sundays and hope the Weather and Roads will soon bless us with it. Never at the Age of 18 when I was a great Reader and Admirer of Tragedies did I take more pleasure in them, than I have lately in Reading La Harps and of Corneille Racine Voltaire Moliere La Fontaine &c did not mean to express a Wish that you should make a serious study of Greek...
I received last night your favour of the fourth, with the Letter inclosed Although I am not able to conjecture, in what manner it can possibly be of any consequence to any one, to prove that in the Year 1777 I argued a cause with Mr Lowell for Col Doane at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, before Judge Brackett, yet as Judge Bourne considers it material to him, I have no hesitation in certifying...
House Barn and Land 10 Acres 2000 } 6500 108. House Barns and Land bought of my Brother with the Additn 3000 House & Land bought of Wm Vesey 1500 24 Place formerly Deacon Belchers 2250 6 Six Acres formerly Col Quincys 700 9 Nine Acres of Pasture on Penns Hill— 270
I will write to you, if it be only for the Pleasure of giving you a Proof under my hand, that I am alive.—We have had no Topicks this Winter but Banks, Insurance offices, Toll Bridges and Turnpike Roads, till lately a Manifesto has appeared of the Republicans Democrats against Governor Strong, made up partly from Dallas’s and partly from the Connecticutt one which Mr. Tracy answered. Your...
I thank you for my Letter from N.Y and the Pamplet inclosed. Commodore Morris’s Defence contains Information which appears to be wanted by our President and all his Ministers, by his senators and Representatives, by his Officers and Men of his Navy, and by the commercial Citizens of our Country. To be sure to protect the Commerce and Seamen in the Atlantic and Mediterranean and blockade...
The Republicans have exerted their Energies, and propagated their lying Pamphlets so secretly, and with such effect as to make Federalists almost doubt their Empire in Massachusetts. They do not yet despair however: but their majority will not be so great as they expected. The Defection of the County of Essex is greater than was foreseen. The Causes of this are many, more than I know perhaps....
Last Night, my Dear Son, I received your kind Letter of the 3d of the Month and hold myself under great Obligations for so much information of various kinds at once. It is my determination to be a better correspondent than I was last Winter. I never explored that route through New Castle and Frenchtown but am very glad you have found it, because I believe it will Save you many an unpleasant...
In your Letter of the 19th, which I have received with its Inclosures, you mention a Letter of the Sixth received from me but take no notice of an other, whose date as I take no Copies I cant remember. I have written you, two before this. Your Mother is much better, and now lives with us but is so zealous about the affairs of the Family that I am almost as anxious for her, as when she was...
I am glad to know by your favour of the 23d of November, that you have received two Letters from me, since which I have written a third and this is No. 4. As I keep no Copies, you must either burn them or keep them very carefully to yourself. I will Number them, that We may know whether all are received. Whatever Reflections or Opinions you may receive from me, you will consider them as...
In your Letter of the 26 of November, to your Brother, you express a “Wish that I could See the course of Things with more indifference.” But this is impossible. The Habits of a whole Life of Man, are not to be changed without difficulty. While Life and Breath and being last, I shall love my Country: and neither the Interests of Posterity nor the Happiness of the present Generation, can ever...
In my Letter of the 14th Ult. I believe I misunderstood the Presidents Position. His Expression that the Judges ought to hang American Citizens who should commit homicide &c meant no more than to express his opinion that the Fact amounted to a Capital Offence. His opinion that it is a Capital offence to resist French Revenue Laws, in the West Indies is totally unfounded. The President was also...
Many Thanks for your favor of the Eleventh. It is very odd, but no less true that I not only never Saw, Mr Bentley, but I never heard of his fame or name, till I read his Election as Chaplain in a Newspaper. Since that time I have heard much, and among other things that he is an intimate Friend of James Winthrop the Judge. Mr Bowdoins appointment is the best, the President has made in this...
Has there ever been an Instance, in the World, of two Persons living together without Emulation and Jealousy.? Is it possible there should be one? When I was finishing the Letter I wrote you on the 22d, the Ladies of the family without knowing what I was about read me, a passage in Hayleys Life of Cowper from p. 122. to p. 127. Vol. 1. Mrs Unwin was eclipsed by the Brilliancy of Lady Austen,...
Your favour of Decr. 24. was received in the regular course of the Mail and in good order. It refreshes me to See that you write in good Spirits. Your Family and private Friends must console you, under all your humiliations in public Life. For fifteen years, i.e from the year 1760 to 1775 I was in the Valley, the dark Valley of Grief Gloom and disappointment; Unalterably devoted to Principles...
I received in Season, your kind Letter of the 5th. and have been so very busy that I have not found time to acknowledge it, till now. When I write to you it is with no Expectation of any Answer, unless it be in a bare Acknowledgement to Some of us, i.e. to me, your Mother or your Brother of the receipt of my Letter. I know that the public Business must as it ought to engage all your time and...
Your favour of the fourteenth, with its ample Enclosures of Documents, has arrived in good order....I deliver all the Journals of Senate and House, all the printed Bills and other printed Papers you send me, to your Brother, who I presume preserves them all in order for your Use and his own. The Season here has been unexampled. We have had an Abundance of Snow but it has been melted almost as...
I received your favour of the 24 of Jan. this morning. I must repeat to you that I neither expect nor desire that you should answer my Letters. I write for my own Amusement and on a Supposition at the same time that a little diversion from your Studies and Labours might give a little pleasure. Neither you nor the Gentlemen who commonly vote with you, ought to discard your concern relative to...
I ought, before now, to have acknowledged the Receipt of your favours and even now I can do no more than acknowledge them, for what Subject have I for a Letter? Shall I Send you diagrams of my Grounds, which the fine Weather of November and December has enabled me me to plough, for Corn, Potatoes, Barley Clover and Timothy? But what a Miniature picture of a Lilliputian Plantation, would Six...
The Mail of yesterday brought, me, the Documents and in the Evening I received from Boston your favour of the 14th. By the Journals of the Senate I see, that you have Work enough, to excuse you from private Correspondences. By all that I read in the Documents, Journals, and Newspapers, it seems to me that the reigning Principle is to crouch to france & Spain and be very terrible to Britain....
In the first place, I must, in conformity with one of the rules ordained by you orators, endeavour to conciliate the affections of my reader, by quieting your Anxiety for your Children, which I can do with a good conscience by assuring you that George and John are in very good health and very fine Spirits. My Sheet would not hold the history of their Studies, their Sports and frolicks. In the...
My Exordium must inform you that George is and has been a long time in perfect health. John has been as plump and gay and hardy and hearty as you could wish him, till yesterday when he looked a little paler or rather a little less ruddy than usual but he worked and played as usual all day: but this morning he discovered symptoms of qualms in his stomack and puked a little, but a Tea Spoonfull...
I have regularly received the Journals and Documents you have been So good as to inclose and two Short Letters for which I thank you. I have recd also the Economica of Mr Blodget for which I pray you to thank him. It is I presume a work of merit and Utility. I have not been able as yet to attend to it very carefully. I have not written to you before, because I had nothing to write, unless it...
Inclosed is the Certificate of forty Shares in the Fire and Marine Insurance Company. The third part of the Capital which is to be paid off, you will please to receive in shares of the Boston Bank, if you approve of it, and hold them as you propose. I am your affectionate / Father MHi : Winthrop Family Papers.
I have not written to you, though I have received two kind Letters from you, Since your departure, giving me very pleasing accounts of your comforts in your Travels. Soon after you left Us, I took the resolution instead of Sending George to Atkinson by the Stage or any other accidental and precarious conveyance to convey him myself. Accordingly We Set out, your Mother your Son and myself, and...
Knowing very well by too long Experience the nature of your Employment, I wish you to understand that I never expect or desire any answers to my Letters except when I expressly request Information, more than a bare Acknowledgment of the Recipt of them. I Say this however upon a very patriotic and Self denying Principle because every Line from you is a cordial to my Spirit. Mr John Smith of...
The distance between Us, the total retirement in which I live and the Want of Facts, render a Correspondence between Us, upon public affairs of very little use to you, though it is a great pleasure to me. The Storm that has agitated the Elements for twenty Years in Europe must be drawing towards a Conclusion, and the last blasts may be the fiercest of all. We have been favoured by Providence...
As I know you hold a higher Rank in the intellectual Scale and a more estimable Situation in the moral Gradations of the Universe than Admiral Nelson, I know of no reason why I should not borrow his Fathers Epithets and for once or twice bestow them upon you. I, who perhaps ought to be indifferent to all Things in this World, and certainly Should conscientiously resign all Men Measures and...