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What! are my venerable Old Friend Gates, and my respectable old Acquaintance Osgood, and my intimate Connection W. S. Smith, about becoming Town Meeting Men and to aid the Democratical Societies, the Constitutional Societies and the Jacobinical Clubbs, in their Attempts to overawe the Government of their Country? or is the Object to divide the People into Parties? or to force Us into a War...
Your Letter of Yesterdays Date has given me much Pleasure. I recognize in it, my own son. Your Language to the Gentleman was manly and your sentiments independent. Col. Smiths Aberrations from the true system of his Country have given me great Uneasiness. You must let me know in Confidence, the Name of the Gentleman. Every Citizen has a right to think, speak and Act for himself in his own...
Your Favour of April 19. I believe has not yet been acknowledged. The Extracts from the King of Prussia were very acceptable. Yesterday I received your favour of May 9 th.— You ask whether there might not exist Such an Equality in Society as the Democrats of this Day Seem to advocate? Yes my Son, there are many Such Societies, in the Forrests of America, called Indian Tribes. Yet among these...
I am delighted with your delicious little Letter of 14 th. —but was puzzled to guess where you got your Description of Lubberland or what do the French call it? Pays de Cocany or some such Word. Does he get this, says I, from Old Chauar, or Spencer, or from shakespear? Young M r Otis, turned me to the Passage in elegant Extracts— It is it seems from the Tempest, which was to me, once very...
Last night I received your kind Letter of Sept r. 3 d and am sorry to find that your Books were not then arrived. Before this day I hope they are in your Office, and I should be glad if you would inform me whether they are or not. The early Part of my Life was Spent among them, and they have never been many Days together out of my thoughts; so that I have contracted an habitual Affection for...
Upon my leaving America, your Father gave me an order upon Mess rs W. & J Willink for five obligations on a Loan of the United States, for a thousand Guilders each, bearing an interest of five per cent. and upon which one years interest will be due, on the first of June next, which he directed me to hold in trust for your use, and subject to your orders. This instruction has been complied with...
Although you have not informed me, of the Result of your Examination at Albany, I shall venture to address this Letter to a Councillor at Law. You will see by your public Papers tomorrow The Address of the Senate to the President in Answer to his Speech, and his Reply. I wish to know the Sensations and Reflections, both of one Party and the other in New York upon both. I have Suffered Some...
I have already written you respecting the private business upon which I was commissioned by your father, and I enclose a duplicate of that Letter, to meet the case of miscarriage, that may happen to the original. But you will expect, and indeed are entitled to some more lines from me, though I have nothing interesting to say to you, except that we are well, and very anxious to hear the same...
I condole with you, under the mournful News of the Barons Palsy. I have long wondered that a Military Character so habituated to exercise should have neglected it so imprudently for so many Years. This Country is loosing in rapid Succession the Characters who were forward and active in the Revolution. M r Handcock, M r sherman M r Alsop, M r Witherspoon, M r Clark M r Lee, M r Gillon, and now...
The Nature, Designs, rise, Progress, present State future Operations and successes of “Selfcreated Societies,[”] are likely to become Objects of interesting Enquiry and should be critically Studied by a Lawyer. We know something of the History of them in France. The fruits of them in Geneva you will see in the Pamphlet inclosed which was written by D’Ivernois. The fruits of them in Scotland,...
This morning I received your favour of the 13 th. and wonder not that your honest heart is disgusted at the Iniquities always practiced at the New York Elections, where I Suppose Lord Nugents Maxim is adopted, that “ all Things are lawful at Elections. ” This moral Aphorism he once alledged as an Apology for having once at an Election at Bristol, when his Lordship and Alderman Beckford were...
The inclosed Tryals of Muir, Margorot and Gerald, will afford you Entertainment and Information. as Nothing lays open the Spirit and Temper of the Times, better than the Criminal Proceedings in the Courts of Justice: I thought I could not send you a more acceptable Present. The great Question whether a Part of the People may So far assume the Powers of Government, already delegated by the...
Our Patriots are so anxious lest Aristocracy should take root, that I wonder they do not eradicate all the seeds of it. instead of Addressing M r Speaker, they should address Freddy Mulenbourg— instead of talking of the Gentleman from Virginia they should quote Billy Giles &c &c &c The Purity of this Symplicity has always appeared among Insurgents. In Chaises and Bradfords Patriotick Efforts I...
Your Letter of the 22 d , alledging Business as an Apology for not writing gave me more Pleasure than a long Letter would have done. Business is always an Apology, for declining Pleasure or Amusement of any kind. I Sent you, by a late Post other Tryals, Geralds, Muirs and Margarots. Geralds is worth all the rest. M r Laing, the Council for Gerald is I Suppose the Same with Malcolm Laing Esq r...
I have received your Letter of December 30 th. — I approve of your caution and applaud your discretion. You ought nevertheless to reconoitre the Country round about you, like a good officer. Between you and me, I believe you to be Surrounded by a gang of sharpers, and I wish you to keep a good look Out, preserve your own honour; keep a clear Conscience and clean hands: but examine every Man...
If C. as you Say in yours of the 29 th. must provide for his Family, I Suppose it will be easy for him to do it: because being not only a Republican but a Democrat by Profession, no doubt he is possessed of the most essential Ingredient in that Character, which is a Love of Poverty and equality. Two Acres of Land is more than an Equality, and as much as Cincinnatus owned, who was an...
A Letter from M r Jay of the 24. of November informs me, that he had rec d two Letters from your Brother in Holland, one of the 14 th. and another of the 20 th. the first at the Hague the last at Amsterdam, which inform’d him that your Brother had been presented to their High Mightinesses, and rec d and acknowledged by them, and that he had Afterwards had an Audience of the statholder. so that...
I was So happy in the News of the agreable Circumstances of your Sister and her Infant, and of the Safe Arrival of your Brothers at the Hague and Amsterdam, that the melancholly Account in your Letter of the 5 th came upon me by Surprize and afflicted me very much. The detestable Cause of your sisters Misfortune the Infidelity or Negligence of the Apothecary, is alarming to every Body. The...
Your Letter of the 7 th relieved my Mind, from a great Anxiety and Depression on Account of my dear Daughter. My Apprehensions foreboded very melancholly Things from the Strange Accident, of which you apprised me— A strict Enquiry ought to be made into the Conduct of that Apothecary. The State of New York never behaved well— it has always been a fluctuating, injudicious selfish and...
As you Seem to wish to know my sentiments of M r Kents Lecture I will give you a few Hints to assist your own Reflections and Inquiries but as they may be liable to misconstruction and Misrepresentation, they must be in Confidence between you and me. I am much pleased with the Lecture, and esteem the Talents and Character of the Professor: indeed I wish you to consider whatever I may write...
Our amiable Professor, in the 5 th Page, informs us that “The free Commonwealth of the United States, which in all its ties, relations and dependencies, is animated with the pure Spirit of popular Representation, offers the highest Rewards to a Successfull cultivation of the Law, and the Utmost Encouragement to Genius.”— I Scarcely have the Courage, my dear son, to write even to you, my...
I have to thank you for your favour of Dec r: 1 st: sent me a few days since by M r Van Rensselaar. It is the first direct communication we have had from any part of our own family, since we left our Country, and it was an article which wanted no stimulus of scarcity to make it valuable. Your political information was very acceptable, and I hope you will not fail to continue it by every future...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favours dated Feb y 16. which M r: Wilcox sent me from Hamburg, and of March 10 th: which came in a Vessel arrived a day or two since at Amsterdam. The newspapers came with them, and proved a great entertainment to us. The Herald is a very excellent paper and I wish you by all means to continue sending it by every opportunity. But when you send them by...
I received some time since from M r: Rogers in London your bill upon me for £225 sterling, with a request to have the money remitted there. I have been obliged in consequence of the measures that have been taken in England, to prevent all payments from this Country, to procure a bill upon London from Hamburg, which I hope M r Rogers will receive within a week or ten days, from this. The...
The most recent intelligence we have from America is contained in your letter of June 30 & July 23. which arrived some days since, and gave me information unpleasant but not unexpected. I was convinced from a variety of reasons that all the engines of popular agitation would be played off against the ratification of the treaty signed by M r Jay, and I knew that some of its contents were such...
I received at this place by your letter of September 3 d: the pleasing intelligence of your marriage, and offer you my warmest congratulations, upon an event so important to your happiness, and thereby to that of your brother. In requesting you to make the assurance of my fraternal affection acceptable to my new Sister, I depend upon your intercession for her permission to add that sentiment...
Your Letter of September 3 d. advising your having drawn the preceding day, bills on me in favour of Daniel Ludlow & C o: for ƒ7,500. at thirty days sight, was received by our Brother Thomas at the Hague on the first of this month, and forwarded by him to me, at this place, where it reached me the next day. The bills though mentioned by you as accompanying the Letter, were not presented for...
So great a Part of my Life has been and Still continues to be Spent in travelling that I seldom trouble my Friends in Conversation or by Letter with the Inconveniences or Adventures I meet upon the Road: otherwise I might give you a Romantic History of my Journey from N. York. The Roads were bad enough and the Company but Speak well of the Bridge that bears you well over— They behaved civilly...
Your favour of 19 th: September was transmitted to me by our brother from the Hague about a fortnight since; I have answered already that of Sept r: 27. which I received on my first arrival here. You will find from one of my former Letters, that with a little balance of yours still to be accounted for by me, and with another little Commission which I have troubled you with your demand on me...
Yesterday I received your kind and pleasing Letter of the 26, and am happy to hear of your and your Ladies health. I dont approve of your calling her Sally unless to herself in a Family Way. To other People especially in Writing you must call her Mr s Adams. Your Nephews and Neice I hope will have the Meazles favourably. it is a good age and a good Season: so that I think the family may be...