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Yours of June 23d. have received. I believe there is no Danger of an Invasion your Way, but the Designs of the Enemy are uncertain and their Motions a little misterious. Before this Letter is sealed, which will not be till Sunday next, I hope I shall be able to inform you better. I rejoice at your fine Season, and still more at my Brother Cranches Attention to Husbandry. Am very glad he bought...
This is one of my fortunate days. The Post brought me, a Letter from you and another from my Friend and Brother. The particular Account you give me of the Condition of each of the Children is very obliging. I hope the next Post will inform me, that you are all, in a fine Way of Recovery. You say I must tell you of my Health and Situation. As to the latter, my Situation is as far removed from...
You will believe me, when I inform You, that I am grievously disappointed in only having to acknowledge the reciept of just two Lines and an half from You by Capt. Grinnell. I am sorry that the Shortness of your Notice has deprived me of so much Happiness. The Card however will keep alive my Expectations ’till the promised Letters arrive. But lest Miss Nabby should think I set no Value upon...
This Letter will go by the Hand of the Honourable Samuel Hewes Esqr., one of the Delegates in Congress from North Carolina, from the Month of September 1774, untill 1777. I had the Honour to serve with him upon the naval Committee, who laid the first Foundations, the Corner Stone of an American navy, by fitting to Sea the Alfred, Columbus, Cabott, Andrew Doria, Providence, and several others....
I reciev’d a few days since your Letter of Sepr. 12th and yesterday that of october the 12th and thank you most sincerly for them both. Your account of Holland entertaind me much. You must have improv’d your time well to have visited so many places and notic’d so much. The fatigue was too great for you. It was this that made you sick. I was rejoic’d to find your dissorder whatever it was for...
I am not surprized at your Anxiety expressed in your Letter of the 25 th. which I rec d Yesterday. The Conduct of certain Mules has been so gloomy and obstinate for five Months past as to threaten the most dangerous Effects. The Proceedings of Boston N. York & Philadelphia now compared with their intemperate folly last July or August is a curious Specimen of Negotians with foreign Courts &...
I am indeed the Silvia, the once favored correspondent of Diana; But I am Silvia without my Beloved flock, my former sheepfolds are Laid waste, my Lambs are scatter’d, and I mourn here among other congregations the loss of my former companions.—I thank you for the testimony you have given me of your remembrance. Should have Certifyd my grateful reception by the first Conveyance but...
I have been waiting till I am out of all patience to hear that you are returnd to England. One or two vessels have sail’d for London without taking Letters for you. I did not know they were going till it was too late to write. I sent you a hasty line by Mr. Charles Bulfinch which I hope you receiv’d and to tell you the truth I have written you two letters Since, which I thought proper to...
I have all along flattered myself with hopes that I might with Propriety have taken Leave of the Senate and returned home, as soon as the Roads might be settled: But such is the critical State of our public Affairs, and I daily hear Such Doctrines Advanced, and Supported by almost and sometimes quite one half of the Senate, that I shall not prevail on myself to abandon my Post. This Day the...
This Morning I received your favour of the 21 st. of January. I am Sure your People do a great deal of Work, So dont be concern’d— I am very well Satisfied with your Agricultural Diary. The venerable Governor made the best Speech he ever made—but the old Leaven ferments a little in it.— I wonder you had not rec d two Letters from Thomas which I inclosed to you. I now inclose you one from M r...
Gen. Warren writes me, that my Farm never looked better, than when he last saw it, and that Mrs. —— was like to outshine all the Farmers. —I wish I could see it.—But I can make Allowances. He knows the Weakness of his Friends Heart and that nothing flatters it more than praises bestowed upon a certain Lady. I am suffering every day for Want of my farm to ramble in.—I have been now for near Ten...
The Judges are now here— Judge Cushing is under the Hands of D r Tate who is Said to have wrought many Cures of Cancers and particularly one for the President. The Judge appears to be under serious apprehensions for something in his Lip which he thinks is a Cancer but his hopes from Tates Prescriptions seem to be lively. M rs Washington is happy in the Company of her three Grand daughters, the...
I have not seen your Letter to Sister Cranch as yet, and cannot tell how you like your present Situation—the People—their Language— nor their manners. But I suppose all “is sweet” now the dear chosen Partner is by. I think I will not allow Cousin Nabby to be a proper Judge. She will pardon me I hope. She views things through an unpleasing medium—she neither feels, nor wishes to be interested...
Mr Lincoln has been here for several Days past— Tomorrow he intends to return to Hingham, & has offered to carry a Letter to either of my Sisters— I would not let so good an Opportunity pass, since I have often experienced how good, & how pleasant it was to receive a few Lines from a dear Friend, informing me of particular Circumstances which are interesting to them, whether it be of Joy, or...
I this day Received a few lines from my Friend, whose Long silence I have not been able to Account for but suppose her Letters are Directed southward. Have you any Late private Inteligence from that quarter, and do our Friends their Really think we shall be Invaded on all sides, or do they mean only to advise us to be Ready. My heart at times almost dies within me only with the Apprehension...
I wrote you a hasty letter from New-York, just to acknowledge the receipt of yours, No. 5, the week before last; since which I have not heard from you, nor have I had an opportunity to write. * * * * * * * Pennsylvania has already appointed her Senators, who are Mr. Morris and a Mr. McLain. Poor —— is, then, disappointed; for he went home to make interest for himself, as it was said. There are...
You may depend on my giving your Letter to Capt. Marston who sets out for Philadelphia on Monday. A safer Hand it could not go by. Pray let your Fears subside about Tumults—there have been none. There was an Assembly of 4000 Patriots at Cambridge yesterday—where the utmost Regularity was observ’d, and after finishing their Business they all repair’d to their homes in Quiet. They procur’d a...
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
Yesterday, I took a long Walk with our Secretary Mr. Thompson to a Place called Fells Point, a remarkable Piece of Ground about a mile from the Town of Baltimore. It is a Kind of Peninsula which runs out into the Harbour, and forms a Bason before the Town. This Bason, within thirty Years, was deep enough for large Tobacco ships to ride in, but since that Time has filled up ten Feet, so that...
I received yours of the 14th. ultmo., should not have defer’d answering it so long had I been able to have wrote you, but have had a lame hand, and was unable to put Pen to Paper when I receiv’d it. I sent you a b arre l of Flower which you acknowledge the Rec eip t off in your Letter. I hope it will prove good. I got Mr. Hall (Baker of this place) to exammine all the Flower we then had in...
Your frindly letter of the 29 th of June —I should not have suffered to remain so long unacknowledge from any other cause than that of the severe illness of my dear Little Washington—who was confined to his bed with a cruel fevor for three weeks in the Months of July & August— I beleive it is heardly necessary my dear madam for me to tell you that, during the time of his illness I was not in a...
This Evening I have satisfactory Intelligence of the real Embarkation of your very dear Treasure at Nantes l’Orient the 17th. of June and that he was left well 12 days after, off the western Islands. The Secretary of Arthur Lee arrived at Metompkin, Virginia, Augst. 1st. in a very swift sailing Vessel. Mr. Adams told him at parting that he had good News for Congress and sent his Respects. The...
I had a mantua makaker & a Tailor last week which keept me so fully imploy’d that I had not time to write I receiv’d your kind Letter by the Post a thursday & rejoice that you have got into such good order so soon. I do not rise quite so early as you but I should if I could get all my folks to Bed in season you do well to devote so much of the day to riding I hope the difficulty the bad roads...
This day, I think, has been the most remarkable of all. Sullivan came here from Lord Howe, five days ago with a Message that his Lordship desired a half an Hours Conversation with some of the Members of Congress, in their private Capacities. We have spent three or four days in debating whether We should take any Notice of it. I have, to the Utmost of my Abilities during the whole Time, opposed...
I read in a great Writer, Montesquieu that “l’honneur, en imposant la loi de servir, veut en être l’arbitre; et, s’il se trouve choqué, il exige ou permet qu’on se retire chez Soi.” C’est une des Règles suprêmes de l’honneur, Que lorsque nous avons été une fois placés dans un rang, nous ne devons rien faire ni souffrir qui fasse voir que nous nous tenons inferieurs à ce rang même.” These being...
I am doom’d my dear Sister to be the messenger of death to you. I believe for five weeks past my Letters have convey’d you an account of the death of Some Freind or acquaintence & almost all of them Suddenly taken away the death of Sucky warner whos remains I yesterday Saw depositted by the Side of our dear Parents & much belov’d aunt. there to remain till the last trumpet Shall bid them...
The Weather still continues cloudy and cool and the Wind Easterly. Howe’s Fleet and Army is still incognito. The Gentlemen from South Carolina, begin to tremble for Charlestown. If Howe is under a judicial Blindness, he may be gone there. But what will be the Fate of a scorbutic Army cooped up in a Fleet for Six, Seven or Eight Weeks in such intemperate Weather, as We have had. What will be...
I have sent one Letter on Board capt Cushing but it is so long since that unless I Write again you will not feel as if you had heard from me for a long time— Cousin JQA & Billy have been at home above a week. Cousin charles was here yesterday. he came to wait upon mrs Hilliard & Daughter— your Sons are all well We are busy prepairing for commencment for although we do so little by way of...
The Postmaster at N. York, in a Panick, about a fortnight ago fled to Dobbs’s Ferry, about 30 Miles above N.Y. upon Hudsons River, which has thrown the Office into disorder, and interrupted the Communication so much that I have not received a Line of yours, since that dated the Second of September. Nor have I received a News Paper, or any other Letter from Boston since that date. The same...
Peace seems to have closed all Communication with America. ’Tis a very long time since any Vessels or Letters have arrived either in France or Holland. We cannot account for this Circumstance, but upon the Supposition, that News had reached America of Negociations for Peace being opened, and that while this Business was pending the Merchant prefered a State of Inactivity to putting any thing...
It is now no longer a Secret, where Mr. Hows Fleet is. We have authentic Intelligence that it is arrived, at the Head of Cheasopeak Bay, above the River Petapsco upon which the Town of Baltimore stands. I wish I could describe to you the Geography of this Country, so as to give you an Adequate Idea of the Situation of the two great Bays of Cheasopeak and Delaware, because it would enable you...
Accept my dear Sister a thousand thanks for your charming Journal, it is just Such an one as I wish’d, so particular that while reading it, I could not help fancying my self with you. We hoped as we had Such fine weather for six weeks after you Sail’d, that you would have had a quicker Passage than I find you had. You did not feel more joy when you set your feet upon the British Coast, than I...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
So I see by the papers that Amelia has become Mrs: Smith , and this the 12th. of June. The news came by the way of Philadelphia, and the first intelligence I had was from our News-Papers. By Callahan, who is expected here every day from London, I hope it will be announced to us officially. Joy to her and to you all! May it be attended with every blessing and pleasure the sanguine wish can...
Your two last Letters had very different Effects. The long one gave me vast Satisfaction. It was full of usefull Information, and of excellent Sentiments. The other relating to the ill Usage you have received from Hayden gave me great Pain and the utmost Indignation. Your generous Solicitude for our unfortunate Friends from Boston, is very amiable and commendable, and you may depend upon my...
Yesterday’s Post brought me your Favour of Sepr. 26th. Your dear Boy Charles should most certainly have had half of the Bed of one of his Father’s devoted Friends here, if the Winds had so directed the Ship’s Course in which he is a Passenger; but I am told she is arrived at Falmouth in Casco Bay. I wish you an happy Meeting with him. I shall be rejoyced to find that the Voyage has been...
This Day is the Aniversary of Eleven Years since our dear Mother left us poor Pilgrims, to sojourn here a little longer upon Earth, while she (as we trust) went to spend an eternal Sabbath in the blissful regions of immortality. The anual return of those Days, upon which some beloved Friend has been taken from me, I devote more particularly to the recollection of their amiable Qualities, and...
I have this moment rec d your favour of 25. April.— If you want more Money before June borrow it of the General whom I will repay when I return. The freight of the furniture was in Mass. L. M.— The Farm goes on admirably well— I am well Satisfied with all you do. The Weather is terribly hot and dry for the season. Yet the Country looks charmingly. I hope to be at home by the first of June....
I am desirous of conveying to you, in a manner that will not probably fail of success, and therefore have written the same Thing by many Vessells. I have ordered some Things to be shipped to you by two Opportunities. But least these should not arrive, or whether they do or not, I beg of you to draw upon me, for one hundred Pounds sterling which shall be paid at sight. Any Person who has...
The Senate are now in Possession of the Budget.— It is a Bone to gnaw for The Aristocrats as well as the Democrats: And while I am employed in attending the Digestion of it, I send you enclosed an Amusement which resembles it only in name. I can form no Judgment when the Proscess will be over. We must wait with Patience. I dined yesterday in the Family Way with The President— He told me that...
Your favour of January 23 d. by Captain Barnard reached me two or three days ago. I am a little surprized that you had not at that date received any letters from me later than July. But indeed the intercourse between America and Holland is so precarious and interrupted that it is scarcely possible that a letter should pass from the one to the other in a shorter time than four or five months....
Encouraged Madam, by your condescention in answering a letter I not long since took the liberty to write you, And relying on your candour to pardon my forwardness, I again take up the pen tho’ not without fear that you will deem me an intruder on your time & patience; In your answer to the letter I have reference to, you gave me all the information I cou’d desire, & I felt myself honor’d that...
I set down with great pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from Mr. Adams dated February 8th, with a poscript from you, which through a Mistake, or neglect in the post Offices did not reach me ’till the 10th. of this instant. I hope it is not too late to thank you for them both. The remedies you have demanded to releive the anguish of your mind occasioned by parting with your dear...
I should be unpardonable if I neglected this Opportunity of writing to you by a private hand, & returning my grateful acknowledgements to my dear Brother Adams & you, for all your kindness—but alas! how inadequate are words to express the feelings of my heart. Upon those occasions I think it my duty to trace mercy’s to there great Source, & look up to heaven with thankfulness that I, & my...
I have written but once to you since I left you. This is to be imputed to a Variety of Causes, which I cannot explain for Want of Time. It would fill Volumes to give you an exact Idea of the whole Tour. My Time is to totally filled from the Moment I get out of Bed, untill I return to it. Visits, Ceremonies, Company, Business, News Papers, Pamphlets &c. &c. &c. The Congress will, to all present...
I most sincerely rejoice with you on the safe Arrival of Mr. Adams in Spain after so short a Passage tho’ attended with some Hardships. In addition to the News in the Prints I venture, upon some confidential assurances from the worthy Genl. Lincoln, to excite your Hopes as to our affairs in that Quarter. It is recommended to redeem the continental Currency at 40 for 1 and to model the Tender...
As you seem so inquisitive about Politicks, I will indulge you so far (indulge, I say, observe that Word indulge! I suppose you will say it ought to have been oblige) as to send you a little more News from abroad. As foreign Affairs are now become more interesting to Us than ever, I dare say your political Curiosity has extended itself e’er this all over Europe. The Agent of the King of...
I have not received my Letters of Recall from Holland and therefore must disappoint you and my self. I have requested them anew and Suppose I shall receive them about Christmas, but whether I do or not, I shall come home, at latest in the first Spring ships, unless I should receive Some new Commission in Europe, which is not likely. I am unalterably determined not to stay in Holland where I...
After a Passage of two days, against contrary Winds, and a terrible Jolt through the Mud, from Helvoet, I arrived here this day, in good health and not bad Spirits. The Princes Birth day is on Saturday: so that I shall not be able to take Leave before Monday, and if I go to Amsterdam afterwards, I shall not be able to leave that City before Wednesday or Thursday: so that I fear you cannot...
The Mail of Yesterday brought me, a rich Treasure in your kind Letters of the 18. 24 and 25 th of January— Ice in the Rivers or Snow or some other Obstructions on the Roads have delay’d the Conveyance of some of them and occasioned their Arrival all together. Columbus and Barneveld were both written with Elegance and Spirit and the poor Wretches who so justly fell under their Lashes were never...