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Having now a good opportunity I Cannot Let it Slip without writing a few Lines To You as it is not often That I have That Pleasure & So I must not let Slip one opportunity in writing To So kind and Tender a Mamma as you have been To me for Which I believe I Shall never be able to Repay you I hope I Shall never forget the goodness of God in Preserving us Through all The Dangers That We have...
I now Sit down to Write a few Lines To inform you That I am now at a good School which I like very Well. I will now give you an account how We live here at 6 o Clock in the morning We get up and go in to School and Stay till half after 8 When We Breakfast and Play till 9 When We go in & Stay till 12 When We dine after dinner we Play till 2 When We go in and Stay till half after 4 When We Come...
I now having an opportunity which to my Satisfaction I have much oftener than I expected when I first came here, in which I improve every time I can in writing to you who has always been so kind a Mamma to me. I last night went to the theatre, after we had got there we found there was no places empty upon which we came home again. RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed in JA ’s hand: “Mrs. John Adams...
Celle ci etant la premiere fois que je ecrire en François ne sera surment pas trop bien Faites mais j’espere que vous le recevére avec le meme plaisir que si elle etoit mieux, si vous considerée le peu de tems que jai eté icí vous ne blamerez pas moi pour ne pas avoir apprit plus de françois. RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed in JA ’s hand: “Mrs. Adams Braintree near Boston.” Text is given here...
it is witth great Pleasure that I now Sit down to write a few Lines to you to inform you of my hea l th & Situation which I like pretty well but I had by much rather be amongst the rugged rocks of my own native town than in the gay city of Paris. yesterday my Pappa received a large number of news papers from america but the 2 armys were then in the Same posture as they were when we came but I...
to day my Pappa received a Letter from you which I had the honour of seeing in which you mentioned your being struck with the account of dotor Franklins being assasinated but that Story like many others I Suppose arose from those set of People who pretend to be the best Lovers of their Country when they are all the time a seeking her ruin in your Letter you said you wrotee to my Pappa in...
you will pardon me if I do not write to you very often for you know how I used to teaze you to write a copy of a letter for me but now I do not have you to write and my Pappa being always a doing publick affaires or a writing to you cannot do it for me, so that I am obliged to think myself, sometimes I think of a few words to write but you know I am no great hand at letter writing for if I was...
My Pappa enjoins it upon me to keep a journal, or a diary, of the Events that happen to me, and of objects that I See, and of Characters that I converse with from day, to day, and altho I am Convinced of the utility, importance, & necessity, of this Exercise, yet I have not patience, & perseverance, enough to do it so Constantly as I ought. My Pappa who takes a great deal of Pains to put me in...
I just now recd. your Letter of septr. ye 29th and read it with great pleasure in which you say you think that writing is not a la mode de paris. on the contrary I have wrote very often to you whether they have fail’d, or whether they have been taken by the English I do not know but your Letters have been more lucky than my Pappa’s and mine for to day is the 2d time that I have received a...
it is now with Great Pleasure that I now sit down to write to you & many a time since I came here I have done the same though you say in several Letters that i.e. to My Pappa that you have not rec’d but two or three Letters from My Pappa or me but Pappa rec’d a Letter from Uncle Smith Dated November the 3th in which he says that he had taken a Number of Letters for the family Yours have been...
I have now the pleasure to acquaint you some news which will be agreable to you. Yesterday morning an extroadinary express from England has brought this news that on Friday 12 i n st. the Populace of London put fire to the hotels of North, Sandwich, Germaine, and Paliseer which was consumed and that at the Moment of the depart of the Letter it went so well that they did not know where it would...
I last night had the honour of reading a letter from you to my Pappa dated Jany. 4th. in which you complain much of my Pappa’s not writing. He cannot write but very little because he has so many other things to think of, but he can not let slip one opportunity without writing a few lines and when you receive them you complain as bad or worse than if he had not wrote at all and it really hurts...
This moment gives me an Opportunity of writing to you but I have very little to write. We are now about 200 leagues from Boston and have been very lucky till now; we had a little storm but it did us but little damage. My young freind Sammy Cooper is a very agreable young Gentleman who makes me more happy on the voyage than I should have been without him; as to his Language I have not heard him...
I am (by the Grace of God) once more safely arrived at Bilbao. I have wrote you an account of my Voyage and why we put into Spain. I have heard Since I left Ferrol that a Child of foar years old might be put into the leak. It was well for us that we arrived as we did, one more Storm would very probably carried us to the bottom of the Sea. We arrived here yesterday at about one o’clock and...
I can never keep my pen out of my hand when ever there is an oportunity of writing and as there is one now by a Captn. Lovett I will make the best of it. I am Sorry to inform you that the Jason and Monmouth are taken and Manly for a third time is in a british prison but you very probably will have heard of this before this reaches you but what more than makes up for it is that there are 50,000...
As there is an opportunity of writing to you, I must by no means let it Slip me; I have wrote you a Small account of my Voyage and that we were obliged to put into Ferrol in Spain. After a terrible journey from thence to Paris of about 1000 Miles we have at last once more reach’d Paris, the day after we arrived Pappa put me to one of the Pensions where I was before, and I am very content with...
I have been wanting to write to you this sometime but there has been nothing worth writing, and even now I know not what to write. We have not long since, heard of the taking of St. Eustatia, it cast a great damp upon the spirits of the dutchmen here; however the latest news from America make up for it for in the English news papers there is paragraph which makes mention that by the latest...
I am afraid you will think I was negligent in not writing more than I did by so good an opportunity as my brother Charles, but I hope you will excuse me as a journey of two thousand of our miles of which I had not the least thought a week before I set out was the only reason for it, so that I had not time to write before I left Holland, as all my time was employed in getting ready to go. We...
It is indeed a long time since I have receiv’d any Letters from my friends in America, and I must own I have been a little behind hand within these two years; in writing to them. However, I hope they will consider that I have been all that time, almost at the world’s end, or to make the best of it, in such an out of the-way place, as made it very inconvenient for me to write: But I should...
Altho’ I have already written you by Mr. Brush who will probably deliver this to you; yet I cannot help writing a few more Lines to justify myself with you, from a reproach; the Idea of which I cannot bear. If the Northern Regions have frozen up that Quick and Lively Imagination, which you are please to say, used to be agreeable to my Friends, they have most certainly not chilled my affection,...
I should deserve, all the reproaches which my friends in America have made me if I neglected writing, by so good an Opportunity as the one that presents itself at this time. Mr. Thaxter who will deliver you this expects to sail for New-York in the course of this Month. He will probably carry the Definitive Treaty, (which was at last signed yesterday,) to Congress. So you will not receive this...
As you have ordered me in a Letter which I have Lately receiv’d to give you my own Observations on the Countries thro’ which I have travelled, the following are some upon Russia; but I must previously beg you will remember, that you Say in your Letter that you expect neither the precision of a Robertson, nor the Elegance of a Voltaire, therefore you must take them as they are. The government...
We are now sailing up North River; and have met the french packet about 6 leagues from New York: she will sail to morrow morning; and has sent her boat on board, while we are at sail. I profit of the only minute instant I have to inform you, that after a tedious passage of 8 weeks, we expect by noon to be at New York. I have not even time to seal the Letter I have prepared for my Sister, and...
I am afraid my dear Mamma, will accuse me again of neglect for not having written to her, since I left her, before now; several Circumstances have concurred to prevent me; and among the rest, the want of an opportunity to convey any Letters; the stagnation of commerce, has of late been so great; that no vessel since my arrival, at Boston has sailed from thence to any port in Great Britain, and...
It is mortifying to me, to be again obliged to offer an excuse, for not having written more frequently to you, and to my father however conscious I may be, of its having been out of my Power, yet the Idea, of your suspecting me of neglecting you, worries me very much. But it has been and still is absolutely necessary for me, to apply myself with unremitting attention to my studies. About ten...
Several months have again elapsed, since, I wrote you, but I shall henceforth, be able to spare more Time, than I could since I went to Haverhill before this. There is now neither the Necessity, nor indeed the possibility, for me to keep as close, as I was in the Winter. I was obliged in the Course of 6 months, to go through the studies, which are perform’d here, in 2 years and 9 months. So...
Three months have now elapsed, since, I have received, one line from Europe; and the only information I have had in all that time, were a couple of paragraphs in the newspapers, the one mentioning your departure from London, and the other your return there; I feel very impatient and anxious for letters, a vessel arrived a few days since; but, I do not hear, that she brought any: if I have been...
At length the scene of my collegiate life is closed, and about a fortnight ago I made a public exit from the university: by the public papers you will have some account of the performances of the day. In one of them (the centinel) you will see it very positively asserted that Freeman, who spoke the other oration is my indisputable superior in style, elegance and oratory. in another paper that...
It is a long time since I wrote you last, but I am perfectly weary of making apologies. I have no doubt but my friends will forgive me, when they recollect the causes which have prevented me from informing them frequently of those trivial events, which the partiality of friendship alone can render interesting. When I was last in Boston, which was about two months ago, I wrote a few hasty lines...
M r: Lincoln, the bearer, is a young preacher, who belongs to Hingham; he is going home, and I cannot suffer the opportunity to pass unimproved; though I have little to say: except that I have been unwell: my nerves have been disordered, and the words of Henry have [. . .] obtruded themselves upon my mind, at the midnight hour. I came here last Saturday, and have such excellent care taken of...
I expected to have received ere this some Letters either from Braintree or Boston; But excepting what I have collected from the Newspapers I have heard neither directly nor indirectly from either. Had any good opportunity for sending, presented itself I should have written, although the only topic of information, would have been concerning myself.— The sum total of my news is that since I...
No, my dear Madam, I have not tasted of the waters of Lethe, nor have the Laws of Nature, been obliterated from my heart, by too close an attention to those of Nations. The reasons which have hitherto prevented me from writing since I left you, are various; but would not be very interesting in the detail, for which reason I shall, omit the unnecessary tediousness of a justification, and offer...
I received on Commencement day, your obliging favour of the 11 th: of last month, and should have replied to it before this time, had I not been constantly employ’d in making and executing my arrangements for my removal to this place. For kind wishes which you are pleased to express for my welfare and happiness, I can only return the sincerest assurances of gratitude; Thanks, are called the...
I received by M rs: Atkinson your favour of the 20 th: inst t: which has added not a little to the weight of anxiety which, before hung heavy upon my mind. The Suspense in which I must continue, I know not how long with respect to my own prospects, has at present a constant operation to depress Spirits not naturally very lively; but when my solicitude for the welfare and happiness of my Sister...
I am I believe more than one Letter in your debt; but I feel if possible less inclination than ever to write to my friends as I have no good news to tell them about myself, and very little about any one else. I have now the advantage of being three hundred miles distant from every member of the family; alone in the world, without a soul to share the few joys I have, or to participate in my...
I received with great pleasure, my dear Mamma, your favour of the 7 th: inst t: which relieved me in some measure from my anxiety on account of your health, though it is now again alarmed at having no letters this evening by the Post. I want exceedingly to hear of your arrival at Philadelphia, and of the thorough restoration of your health.— I hope nothing will induce you to spend another...
I have just returned from the Post-Office, where I was in hopes of finding Letters from Philadelphia, but found myself disappointed. I wrote you almost a month ago by a private hand, (M r: Gray) and I hope you received my Letter in Season. I have since thought that some of the expressions in it, upon a subject which principally concerns myself might rather tend to increase your alarm than to...
I wrote to my brother Thomas more than a fortnight ago, respecting the warrant, & requesting him to see it forwarded— But whether from an apprehension on his part of an additional delay, or from what other cause I know not, he has not done it, and last Evening in answer to my Letter I received from him one urging very strongly the necessity of his having an order to receive the money.— Two...
The stage in which I had engaged a passage for Philadelphia this morning, has gone away by mistake, and left me behind, which gives me leisure to write a line by my brother. He intends to pay you a visit this summer, and will be the bearer of this. I was detained three days in Newport for a wind, but otherwise have had a very comfortable passage from Boston hither— I find my health better than...
I am yet uncertain as to the next point of my departure. But as I do not hear of any opportunity to go from hence, it is probable I may be permitted to return to Boston. I am glad that the man who has partly engaged to go with me, has already been to take, the small pox, as he will probably be ready upon my return and I shall be obliged to go by the very first opportunity. I have begun upon my...
I am still waiting for the arrival of Col l: Hamilton whom it is necessary for me to see before my departure, and who has been detained several days in the Country by the sickness of a child. I received your favour of the 20 th: inst t: and my brother is now prepared to go with me.— We should be very happy to comply with your request respecting the bracelets, but we shall certainly not have...
We have been already ten days in this place, but there has been no opportunity to Boston since our arrival. And altho’ I have done but very little, yet I have been so perpetually busy, that I have scarce found time even to write to the Secretary of State, and to my Father. My Brother I presume has informed you, how pleasant our passage was in every respect, excepting the conveyance, & how very...
The day after the date of my last Letter, we dined at M r: Hallowell’s, and were entertained with much hospitality. We saw his Daughter, whom we found very amiable and accomplished After seeing her, I felt myself at least highly flattered by the proposal M rs: Gill made to you, and the young Lady, certainly took the shortest way to my heart, by the manner in which she spoke of you. I was much...
I hear of an opportunity from Rotterdam to Boston, but so lately that I have scarce time to write any Letters except my necessary dispatches. General Eustace goes as a passenger in this vessel, and I have given him letters of introduction to you and several other of my friends in Boston. Had I known of this vessel earlier I could have taken measures to send your things by her; which for the...
The arrival of the french Army in this Country, as the friends and allies of the Batavian People, and the Revolution, which has abolished the Stadholdership, the nobility, the former States of the Provinces, and the Regencies of the Cities, will undoubtedly be a subject of considerable attention in our Country; perhaps it may give occasion to many groundless rumours and reports, and possibly...
Your favour of Nov r: 26. Was not quite five months in reaching me. I received it about a week since, and as the first direct communication from you, since we sailed it was peculiarly acceptable, though it had been so long on the way. You have received before this time I presume, my letter of Feb y: 12. at least you are informed of the great changes which have taken place in the Government of...
We seem to be once more restored to some connection with our own Country; for six months after we left it, we might have been almost ignorant of its existence, but for the perpetual admonition of our own Hearts. A few days since I received from Hamburg, your favour of Feb y: 10 th. The third letter of yours that has reached me, and all within the course of three Weeks. Had you known of the...
We have very seldom an opportunity of hearing from you; and still more seldom that of writing you by a direct opportunity. An indirect one presents itself, and I cannot let it pass, were it barely for the pleasure of writing you that we are well, and enjoy in profound tranquility the beauties of the Season. The Peace and Alliance between France and Holland; the violent insurrection against the...
Your favour of April 22. marked N. 4. reached me a few days since; I have already acknowledged the receipt of your three preceding letters and have answered them. The sight of a letter from America has lost none of its charms in Europe, and that of one from you can never lose them in any part of the world. I have just written an encyclopaedia of politics (I mean in point of quantity) to my...
I received yesterday your favour of May 25 th: not numbered but the fifth that has reached me from you; the four former ones I have acknowledged before. The Peace and tranquility of this Country has not hitherto been interrupted since the Revolution, and it is to be hoped that it will continue to be inviolate. The greatest dangers to which it is exposed proceed from the popular Societies,...