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In my last I think I informed you that the news of this place was become so little interesting that my journal must cease added to which my health has become so unequal I am seldom well two days together—The last week we had a party of twenty at dinner consisting of Mr: & Mrs.Otis, Mr: Mason, Mr. & Mrs. Sears, Miss Perkins, Mr. & Mrs: Tucker of Virginia, Govr. & Mrs. Middleton of South...
I was then once more honoured with your affectionate favour of the 27th favour—from which I receive a fresh proof, that you do justice to my feelings, and perceive, how highly I value Such distinguished marks of your attention. I regard these indeed as one of the great blessings, which a kind Providence bestows on my chequered life, and for which I can never be too ardently thankful, could I...
It is long since I wrote you in consequence of a very severe indisposition which confined me to my bed ten days and to my chamber more than a fortnight—The time thus passed of course afforded but little to relate and still less to interest—On Tuesday evening 10 of March I drank Tea with Mrs. Sergeant a most charming woman, the Wife of a member of Congress from Philadelphia—It was a social...
Although I highly value the honour of your esteemed correspondence—even if it should be limited within the limits of a few lines, yet I receive a far higher gratification from the kind sentiments of friendship, and the unquestionable proofs of your good opinion, which you art pleased to bestow upon me. My only regret remains, that I can not reciprocate these—and that from my part, I often...
10 Mr Adams attended the funeral of Mr Astor’s grandson on arriving at Mr Astors the old Gentleman told him he had received a most urgent Letter from Mrs Bentzon begging that the body might be sent to her at New York and asked his advice what he should do on the melancholy occasion Mr Adams told him that considering all the circumstances he thought it would be best for him to indulge his...
I am very happy to find by your Letter of the 7th that you are kind enough to be satisfied with my efforts to amuse you I am generally obliged to write in so great a hurry that I cannot attend to elegance of style and I believe I cannot always boast of writing sense—I am only guided by the current of my thoughts which frequently flow too rappidly to be perfectly rational—If however they enable...
It is with high respect that I have the honor to assure you, you have mistaken my “Register” as well as its character , in attributing to it an offensive article about “ Drawing Rooms; ” while I have to regret that this is not the first time in which my secret pride has been humbled by a similar misapprehension. And such mistakes are easily committed, because another paper is published (at...
I was honored with your note, & have attended to it as I hope is in accordance to your will on the subject. I have suffered several times by such mistakes as are noticed in my printed reply; & the opportunity to vindicate myself was so happily presented that justice seemed to require that I should not pass it over. I disavow all connection with the party business of the past or present—&...
We came here in less than four hours. Found the riding much better than was expected & were not in the least incommoded by the rain. The Ply Stage was on wheels. We had Tea immediately after which Mr Hammatt left as being so anxious to join his family we could not persuad him to pass the night here. I find myself invigorated by the excursion, as is always the case after joining the society...
23d. received a note from Mrs. Monroe requiring my attendance at 1 oclock I went according to appointment and found Mrs. Monroe in her small Drawing Room ready to receive me—She opened the business by apologizing for the liberty she had taken but she really took such an interest ing in me that she had thought it right to speak to me on the subject of visiting and ettiquette She asked what was...
16 Went out to pay some visits and in the evening had a small party to Tea which consisted of my Sisters their husbands Mr & Mrs Walsh the Chevallier Corea Mr Pope & Mr Trimble & Mr Vail a protegie of Mr Crawfords. We had some conversation and a little Music; on the whole the evening was very dull— 17 This morning went out as usual to pay visits after a great deal of trouble and being in...
Jany 1 1818 The Circle was extremely crowded. On our arrival Mr. A was ushered into a room where the Presidents aid’s were in waiting, and I was introduced by the President who met me at door into the Circular Hall where Mrs. Monroe was seated with Mrs. Hay and Miss Gouverneur. She rose immediately and received me with much ease and affability; I was followed by the Ladies of the heads of...
My letters to my dear wife will have informed you of our arrival here: I sent several to her by the London Packet bound to Baltimore: there was a Boston ship near Portsmouth but she sailed before I could get any letters on board of her and I do not think she will arrive at this season of the year as soon as one farther South. I find my health improve (notwithstanding this damp climate) very...
Decbr. 15 A Stormy and bousterous day a large party invited to dine being the first Diplomatic dinner nothing to be had and the expence enormous no visitors and no news 16 In much distress about my dinner a french Cook very drunk & every thing in confusion at 1/2 past four the company assembled consisting of Mr. & Mrs. Bagot Mr & Mrs. de Neuville Mr Tencate Mr. Glenham Mr Hughes Mr. Antrobus...
I began to be quite uneasy at your long silence my and was much pleased to find by your Letter of the 12th that pleasure and not sickness was the cause of your delay in answering my last. I am very sorry to hear that Mrs de Wint health is weak and I agree with you in the opinion that she left home too early I hope however that when she returns and resumes her quiet mode of life that she will...
Your kind Letter of 15th. October was received by me on the 20th. from which time, the only possible choice that has been left me with regard to my employments has been what necessary act of duty I should postpone for the sake of attending others still more urgent. On that day (the 20th.) the President returned to the City.—There is a routine of the ordinary department business of the...
Had I not been honoured, So often; with proofs of your kindness, with which you was pleased to distinguish me among the numbers, who know, how to value the privilege of paying their homage to truth, I might deem an apologÿ necessarÿ for Sending a few insignificant lines from Philadelphia—From this point of view they would be considered by others—They may reallÿ be Stamped in this manner—your...
An alternation of six Stages, and six Steam-Boats finally landed us here yesterday afternoon, being the very day upon which I had promised to be here. The President had arrived here on Wednesday, and occupies the official mansion, where I had an interview with him last Evening—But the walls are fresh plaistered, and the wainscoting is new painted; and they render it so insalubrious for present...
Will you permit me at this late period to come before you with my congratulations on the return of your Son and his family to their native country, I have wish’d to do it ever since I heard of their arrival. I am almost ashamed to say, and yet it is the real reason Why I did not, that I feel such a diffidence in writing to you that I cannot conquer, and which induces me forego what I esteem...
We have arrived safely at this place after a fatiguing journey owing to the dust and extreme heat of the weather which nearly overcame me and produced so much fever by the time we reach’d New London we were apprehensive I should be incapable of proceeding as I found myself considerably better we took our passage in the Steam Boat at New London yesterday morning at 7. o-clock and reached New...
I congratulate you, my illustrious friend the President, and all your family on the safe arrival of your son His Excellency John Quincy Adams to the country of his love, and of his fathers. I have not the honor of a personal acquaintance with Mr. Adams, If I had I would not trouble you with what I am about to ask, though he probably remembers the many letters he received from you through my...
We propose leaving this place tomorrow my dear Madam and expect to arrive at Quincy either Sunday or Monday you must prepare to find us all much altered since we last saw you and I have lost all my good looks and all my flesh on the voyage in consequence of a bad miscarriage at Sea added to the usual inconveniences attending the passage I am however past recovering my health and strength and...
After a passage of fifty days from Cowes, we have this day landed from the Ship Washington; all well—We shall stay here only so long as may be indispensable for landing our baggage, and making other necessary arrangements. In the course of a week or ten days, I hope to enjoy the happiness of seeing once more, my dear father and you—Remaining in the meantime, ever affectionately your’s. MHi :...
Your kind favor of the 14th of this month, was very gratifying to me. Nothing can be more interesting then the account which it gives of the Presidents visit to Boston and the vicinity. The letter from Mr Adams which you were so good as to enclose, I have to apologize for not returning sooner. I desire to thank you for the opportunity afforded me of perusing it. There is an impressive wisdom...
I am one of the Trustees of the Trasylvania University, and on that account have to request the favour of you to give me in detail as correct a view as you can of the moral habits, literary attainments, and religious tenets, of Docr. Holly—Is. he a Christian? Does he deny the divinity of Jesus Christ? That is does he believe Jesus Christ to be merely an inspired man, or the Son of God in the...
The long friendship experienc’d from you, and the President and the regard he has ever had for our lamented Father and my poor agoniz’d Mother induces me to take the liberty of soliciting you both in our behalf—When we left Washington we had reason to believe if my Parent was unable from indisposition or if this sad event we now all mourn —was to take place, my Husband would be his...
The President yesterday received a letter from Mr Adams, in which he mentions his acceptance of his late appointment, and that he expected to embark in the course of the present month. The letter is dated on the 19th of April. In the possible event of this information not having reached you by the same vessel, I hasten to communicate it, offering my renewed congratulations to yourself and Mr...
I am very happy that you have favored me with a letter respecting Mr Smith. It increases the interest that I before took in his situation. I will not permit myself to believe that any recollections are cherished to his disadvantage, on account of that portion of his conduct as a youth to which you have alluded. It would not be simply unkind, but unjust. It would be cruel. I took great pleasure...
As we are on the point of departure and much engaged I can only write to mention that we are all well and very desirous of soon meeting you in Boston. The remainder of the time that we shall stay in this Country will be very unpleasant as we are harrassed to death in procuring furniture and such articles as may be useful to us in America according to the advice which you gave us in a Letter...
Your letters, dear Madam, are always welcome, and your requests are commands to me. I only regret that I can do so little towards obeying them. but eight and twenty years since I left France would, in the ordinary course of mortality, have swept off seven eighths of my acquaintances, and when to this lapse of time are added the knife of the Guillotine & scythe of constant and sanguinary wars,...
Your letters, dear Madam, are always welcome, and your requests are commands to me. I only regret that I can do so little towards obeying them. but eight and twenty years since I left France would, in the ordinary course of mortality, have swept off seven eighths of my acquaintances, and when to this lapse of time are added the knife of the Guillotine & scythe of constant and sanguinary wars,...
Although I have it not in my power to make this Letter in any manner interesting—yet I am So fullÿ confident of your good opinion, and your willingness to oblige me, that you will permit me, in acquitting me of a duty, by assuring you of my grateful Sense of your favour. This acknowledgment you might not doubt—but it is a pleasure to indulge it. It was however a higher gratification—as it was...
Some time in the early part of last month, I had the pleasure to write you a letter in answer to your favor of the 24th of March. The mail is so true that it never occurs to us to doubt the safe arrival of a letter when we know that it has been safely lodged in the post office; nor did that which I wrote leave any thing suspended leading me to look for an answer. My only reason for thus...
Your kind Letters of 12 and 17. March, the latter enclosing one (copy) from Mr H. G. Otis to my father reached me on the same day with a Letter from the New President of the United States, informing me that with the concurrence of the Senate, he had appointed me to the Office just vacated by himself—I had never received from him any previous intimation that it was his intention to make this...
We have been many weeks without receiving a line from you, or from any of our friends at Quincy—Your last was of 8. January, and then remarked on the mildness of the Season on that side of the Atlantic; corresponding with that which had been experienced here—But here it continued through the Winter, and to this day we have scarcely been visited with frost or snow, while we hear that in your...
I am to thank you for the kind wishes contained in your favor of the 24. of last month. You have often, indeed, gratified and flattered me by similar ones, and I feel how much I owe to your over partiality. The appointment of Mr Adams gives, as far as I can ascertain, the highest satisfaction. If ever a citizen of our country owed his elevation to the solid merits of his own character, your...
For some time past I have been wishing to have the pleasure of writing to you, to express my thanks for the very kind and flattering letter you addressed to me by Miss Sumner; also to repeat to you the gratification I felt at an introduction to Col Sumner and herself. All agreed that they were ornaments to the society of Washington this winter. It was not however in my power, and truly did I...
There have been a multitude of American Vessels, wind–bound at Liverpool near two months, several of which have Letters for you, and for my father, and which I suppose will nearly all arrive about the same time—In the interval there will be a wide chasm during which you will be without advices from us, as we have now been long without any from you—The present will go by Mr A. H. Everett, who...
A long time my beloved Friend has elapsed since we have seen each other or even conversed by letters. My eyes are so affected by the fire in winter, that I do not attempt to write. It was my intention when at Quincy to have spent the winter at Scituate; but as soon as dear Sister Bowers relinquished the idea of being there also; I was decided at once to pass it here; A spot rendered very dear...
Did I not foster Such an exalted opinion of John Quincy Adams, then yet I might deem it a becoming courtesy to address his excellent Parents on this Solemn occasion—But now I will indulge the irresisteble impulse, of allowing my Self the exquisiste gratification, which not often can be offered, in congratulating his Mother with the certainty—that the highest office—in the gift of the...
Unexpectedly I found myself once mor honoured with a few lines and well in a Season—in which the Severity of the weather might prevent any other—besides your Ladyship to bestow Similar favours: It cheered indeed my nearly benumbed Spirits; but—what enhanced the value of this gratification—was your courtesy in permitting me the perusal of a gift—intended by the Embassador for his favoured...
I know you will rejoice with me that Mrs. Cranch is again the mother of a daughter. This event happend last Evening. Mrs. Cranch requests you to permit us to name her with your name, not only as a testimony of our gratitude to you r for all your kindness to us and our connections, but as an incentive to the little stranger to in imitate the virtues which she will hear recounted when she shall...
Scarce a day now passes without the arrival of vessels laden with flour from the United States. I am informed from Liverpool that upwards of twenty-five thousand Barrels have already been received there since the opening of the Ports. We have had several days ago accounts from New-York, down to the 18th. of last Month; and on Saturday I received your kind Letter of 8. Jany.—There is an old...
Nothing further received from you, since I wrote you last week—My boys have returned to School; and to close their holidays I went with them to Drury–Lane Theatre, and saw the Tragedy of Richard the third—The part of this amiable hero, was performed by Mr Kean, who is now the reigning favourite of the Public—They have mutilated this Play so much in their manner of getting it up, that it is...
Mr J. Sergeant, arrived in London last week, and delivered to me Letters from you, my father and my brother. Your’s is of 5. December—At that time, you observe, the Season with you, had become very cold—Most fortunately for this Country, there has been no cold weather this Winter, and scarcely any Snow. The verdure of the fields in this neighborhood, is like that of May—There are several...
Scarcely a day now passes, without the arrival of vessels from the United States; but they are principally from New York or more Southern Ports—The failure of the Harvests in this Country has much contributed to their frequency. Two years ago the British Parliament made a Law, to raise the price of Bread; having discovered that if that first necessary of life should be cheap, the Country would...
Your favour of 26. November, is yet the latest that I have received from you—But since my last to you, and since mine of the 3d. instant to my father, I have received one from him, more earnestly calling upon me, to ask my recall from this Mission, and return home—I have in my last Letters both to him and you, expressed my sentiments and intentions on this subject, and have alledged such...
I owe you, dear Madam, a thousand thanks for the letters communicated in your favor of Dec. 15. and now returned. they give me more information than I possessed before of the family of mr Tracy. but what is infinitely interesting is the scene of the exchange of Louis XVIII. for Bonaparte. what lessons of wisdom mr Adams must have read in that short space of time! more than fall to the lot of...
I owe you, dear Madam, a thousand thanks for the letters communicated in your favor of Dec. 15. and now returned. they give me more information than I possessed before of the family of mr Tracy . but what is infinitely interesting is the scene of the exchange of Louis XVIII . for Bonaparte . what lessons of wisdom mr Adams must have read in that short space of time! more than fall to the lot...
General Boyd, Mr Stores, Mr Forbes, and Mr and Mrs. Everett, have all arrived in London within the week past; and by them, with many other Letters and despatches I have received your favours of 5. and of 26. November—There must be I think a Letter in arrear between the 30th. of September and the 5th. of Novr—You acknowledge the receipt of my Numbers 92 and 93—and 97 and 98. I hope the...