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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith"
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It is impossible for me to express to you my dear, my much beloved Aunt, the consolation your kind affectionate letter afforded me, it was balm to my oppressed, my wounded heart. Yes my dear Aunt, I have indeed been tried in the school of affliction, but that Almighty Being, who will not willingly afflict, or grieve the children of men, has enabled me to support this trying dispensation of his...
Mr and Mrs: Smith left Paris on the 22d: of March to embark in the Fingal at Havre for New-York—I wrote to you by them on the 19th—They sailed on the 30th with a fair wind, and having a fine ship, the most favourable season of the year for a voyage to America, I hope they are at this time near the port of their destination, Here the Easterly winds have constantly prevailed from the time of...
To fulfil my promise I set down to give you an account of George & John—they brought Stephen Perkins here—& as he seem’d to be very much pleas’d at being with them & not inclined to quit them I took him with us to Mr. Lymans—to see the picture—which George examined with attention—We then went to get John’s hlep &—proceeded to Mrs. Quincys Crufts & Smiths. Perkins desir’d me to let them go in...
I could not my dear Mrs Adams hear of the sudden death of your beloved Sister, without sympathizing in your sorrows; you like myself, have recently been call’d to part with many dear friends. The tender cords, of consanguinity friendship & affection are breaking fast from us, & we are every day call’d to mourn, for our own, or the publick loss. Your sister’s has been a useful & an active life,...
I am at a loss how to express my obligations for your kind remembrance after the long interruption to our correspondance. Be assured dear Madam it is not because I am insensible to the favor you have conferred on me. I feel the full force of your condecension. I also feel how inadequate I am to offer you any suitable return for the gratification your letters afford me, therefore I have been...
will be so good as to send the enclosed to Dr Tufts, & she will oblige me—I have not time now only to request you to give our love to the dear Lads, who are going to the arms of the best of Parents—May they reach him in safty, & rejoice his heart—My dear Brother, & Sister, have long sacrificed private feelings, to the publick Interest—Though I regret the satisfaction you are deprived of, in...
Yesterday Morning I received the first information of the ratification, by the Government of the United States of the Treaty of Peace concluded at Ghent on the 24th: of last December—The Ratification was received at London last Monday Evening the 13th: instant, and the Communication of the Event by Lord Castlereagh to the Lord Mayor was made about eleven O’Clock that Night—It was brought by...
I received your kind letter of the 22d. of Feby. this morning—I have the pleasure to inform you of the restoration of my health—Congress will adjourn of course on Friday next—the roads are intollerably bad I have my horse and Sulkey with me, and after the roads get a little settled, I shall travel on gently to new york, and perhaps to the Valley—an extra meeting of Congress will take place,...
My last Letter to you, was of the 31st: of January, from Bruxelles; and I enclosed it to Mr Beasley at London, requesting him to forward it by the earliest possible opportunity. By his answer he informs me that he dispatched it by the Packet which was to sail on the 15th: instant from Falmouth—Two days after it was written I left Bruxelles and came to this City where I arrived on the 4th:...
Again I owe an increase of my happiness in my Solitude to your kindness in honouring me with your interesting letter of Febr. 3d—with which I was So unexpectedlÿ favoured. It is true, I owe it in part to an unwelcome guest, but it would be in me ungrateful—to defraud him of mÿ thanks, how unpleasant his appearance may have been to you. That visitant at least is in So far good natured, that,...