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  • Author

    • Peabody, Elizabeth Smith Shaw
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Peabody, Elizabeth Smith Shaw" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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It has been many weeks since I have heard from you; I hope you have enjoyed health. Our Winter has been very temperate, so warm that we could have no sleighing, & great dificulty the people have had to transport the produce of their rich Farms—I pitied their Cattle, more than their Masters for many broke their Limbs, & died. I mended a Shirt and several things for Cousin William and John which...
I had anticipated a visit from Mrs Adams, & both her Children, for a few days at least, when she came to Haverhill, & we regretted very much that it was not in our power to send for them, or to visit her while there—Abby, & I, both went down a monday, and had the mortification to find she went to Boston the Saturday before—Mr Peabody was absent the whole of your Thansgiving week, & I could not...
It is a long time my Dear Sister, since I have written to you; but I consider it a priviledge that we can think of our Friends, animate our Souls by a view of their useful lives, & refresh ourselves by a retrospect of past scenes, when we cannot find one leisure moment to visit them, or impress our Ideas upon paper.— Ever since Thansgiving we have had one, or other of our Family sick in bed,...
I hope my Dear Sister has had her Cup of happiness filled, by having an amiable long absent Son, with his wife & little One, sit at her Thanksgiving Table. I have not heard of his return from Washington, but presumed it would be an object with him to be with his beloved Parents upon that Day. I thought of the pleasurable Circle, & sincerely wished myself one of the Affectionate Band, for I...
Mr Lion and his intended I suppose so , as the modern phrase is, called here last Wednesday—I was very glad to see any one from your house, that could give me any information of my Dear Sisters health & welfare—I told Mary, she I fancied, was going to add one more pair to the Nuptial Circle of your Dometicks—She with down cast smiling simpers, blushed the Affirmative— She talked as if she...
I have been much gratified by a charming visit from my Son. He looks very pale, but says he is well—he is always languid in the summer, & his fibres relaxed—My Children have all partook too much of their Mother, in their Constitution—I never thought I could find anything like myself, in his countenance before this visit, & I thought I saw so much, that I could not help looking at him—He...
For the communications by Mrs. Black, you have my grateful acknowledgements. She made me only a short, and sweet. I was very sorry she could not tarry longer. I rejoice to hear that after many dissappointments your Eldest Son is at length made the happy Father of a living Child. May his and your joy be complete, by seeing it grow up, a comfort to its Parents, an honour and a blessing to the...
When your Son delivered me your kind letter, little did I think, it would be so long, before I should reply. But my youngest Girl went home the Saturday after, & I have had a round of heavy cares upon me ever since. It was ten weeks before we could get any other Girl, & in some of the worst cold weather, & dreadful Storms which has proved quite too much for Lydia & me. But it could not be...
I hear by Dr Tufts that our Medford Farm will be greatly injured by the middlesex Canal being cut through the land—I am very sorry to have what little landed property I have destroyed—But I suppose it will do no service to object—people are so very economick, & publick spirited at this day, that every thing must be sacrificed to the common weal—But the President, & you my Sister know much more...
The night before, our Exhibition I received your kind letter, which indeed sunk my spirits, as you can well suppose. My poor sick Son!—I had heard he had been ill, but was much better—& I hoped as I heard nothing from any one, that he had gotten quite well. I write to let him know that it is the joint request of Mr Peabody & myself that he would come & endeavour to revisit in the good air of...