You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Tufts, Cotton
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
    • Adams, Abigail Smith

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Tufts, Cotton" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith"
Results 1-10 of 14 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Yours of the 28th. Ulto. I received the 10th. Instt. with the inclosure & shall take the first Opportunity to fulfill your Request. From your Letter it seems to me, that your Journey in part must have been very untoward, and troublesome; but your safe Arrival and without your Health having been injured, must have afforded much Pleasure to the President as well as it has done to your Friends...
In my last I informd you of having contracted with the Two Shipleys. I had kept them sometime in Suspence, they grew uneasy and wishd to be determind. Business of every kind was pressing fast upon us, to depend upon transient Help would be precarious and to delay engaging a fortnight or Three Weeks in expectation of getting cheaper Help, appeared to me would ultimately be a Loss. At this Time...
Your several Letters of the 15, 18 & 22d. have relieved my Mind and led me more fully to comprehend the Business before me. I mentiond to you Mr. Porters Terms. I presume you will think it best to comply with them, being confident that you will not meet with more faithful & trusty Persons than He & his Wife—He wants a greater Degree of Self Sufficiency to command at all Times with...
I wrote to You the 14th. Inst. acknowledging the Receipt of Yours of Feby. 21. & the 6th. of this month. I have conferred with Mr. Porter and his Wife relative to their Continuance on the Farm for 7 Months—I cannot bring mr. Porter to a less Sum than 175 Dollrs for that Term, which is 25 Dollars more than you mentiond, altho it appears to me that it would upon the whole be better to give that...
Yours of the 21st. Ulto. and the 6th. Inst. came to hand Yesterday with $200 enclos’d, this Day have given orders to Mr Bates to proceed, with all Dispatch—he says You left undecided the Dimensions of the lower Room of the proposed Addition—27 by 20 was mentiond, but whether of that or less Dimensions he is uncertain—The Height also of the Room is wanted—How much is to be dropd from the Level...
Your last of Jany 9th. I receiv’d with the enclosure, since that very little has been heard off but Processions, Funeral Elogies, Orations & Discourses on the Death of Genl. Washington. Indeed it has been carried to an Excess, in some Instances too much bordering on Idolatry and been attended with an enormous Expence of Time—Had one Day every where been devoted to a public Expression of Grief...
The sudden & unexpected Death of the illustrious Washington has excited universal Mourning, Weeping & Lamentation. On this solemn Occasion Mr Norton Yesterday in the afternoon gave us a very pertinent Discourse from 2d. Samuel 3d C. 38. V. “And the King said unto his Servants, Know ye not, that there is a Prince and a great Man fallen in Israel”? This Loss is considered as irreparable. To find...
I have the Pleasure of hearing of your Arrival at East Chester and in Health. Since You left Quincy, We have scarcely had a Storm, except that which occur’d on your Journey. The Weather has proved favourable for Farming Business and for finishing the Cellar, which will probably be compleated this Week as far as was intended, th’o not in all its Parts as was directed by Brizler, the Part next...
In Consequence of its being a rainy Day and confind at Home I have an Opportunity of acknowledging the Receipt of Yours of the 29th. Ulto. & the 8th. Inst. About the 8th. or 10th. Instant I wrote to the President and to You also— I have now compleated the Business assigned me respecting the new Building, and such Repairs to the Dwelling House as appeared to be necessary have also been made and...
I wrote to you about the 20th. Inst. which probably you have receiv’d by this Time—I rejoice to hear that Mr. Marshall has arrived and hope for the Arrival of the other Envoys soon—Their long & patient stay at Paris under a State of Humiliation, was considerd by many as too degrading, it may however have answered some good Purposes and eased the Minds of some who perhaps would have thought,...