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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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It is with high respect that I have the honor to assure you, you have mistaken my “Register” as well as its character , in attributing to it an offensive article about “ Drawing Rooms; ” while I have to regret that this is not the first time in which my secret pride has been humbled by a similar misapprehension. And such mistakes are easily committed, because another paper is published (at...
As we are on the point of departure and much engaged I can only write to mention that we are all well and very desirous of soon meeting you in Boston. The remainder of the time that we shall stay in this Country will be very unpleasant as we are harrassed to death in procuring furniture and such articles as may be useful to us in America according to the advice which you gave us in a Letter...
My health has been so indifferent and the City is so flat since the adjourment of Congress that I cannot find materials for a Letter—It is difficult for me to say what the nature of my indisposition as the Doctor cannot ascertain it no more than myself but I believe general weakness and a slight attack of what they here call chills and fevers has been my chief complaint and the latentness and...
I began to be quite uneasy at your long silence my and was much pleased to find by your Letter of the 12th that pleasure and not sickness was the cause of your delay in answering my last. I am very sorry to hear that Mrs de Wint health is weak and I agree with you in the opinion that she left home too early I hope however that when she returns and resumes her quiet mode of life that she will...
For some time past I have been wishing to have the pleasure of writing to you, to express my thanks for the very kind and flattering letter you addressed to me by Miss Sumner; also to repeat to you the gratification I felt at an introduction to Col Sumner and herself. All agreed that they were ornaments to the society of Washington this winter. It was not however in my power, and truly did I...
Will you permit me at this late period to come before you with my congratulations on the return of your Son and his family to their native country, I have wish’d to do it ever since I heard of their arrival. I am almost ashamed to say, and yet it is the real reason Why I did not, that I feel such a diffidence in writing to you that I cannot conquer, and which induces me forego what I esteem...
Your kind favor of the 14th of this month, was very gratifying to me. Nothing can be more interesting then the account which it gives of the Presidents visit to Boston and the vicinity. The letter from Mr Adams which you were so good as to enclose, I have to apologize for not returning sooner. I desire to thank you for the opportunity afforded me of perusing it. There is an impressive wisdom...
I am to thank you for the kind wishes contained in your favor of the 24. of last month. You have often, indeed, gratified and flattered me by similar ones, and I feel how much I owe to your over partiality. The appointment of Mr Adams gives, as far as I can ascertain, the highest satisfaction. If ever a citizen of our country owed his elevation to the solid merits of his own character, your...
Tomorrow we leave this place with the intention of visiting you in Boston if nothing should intervene and force us back again to Washington. We shall be in Boston the latter end of the next week as we propose to leave Philadelphia on Monday Morning—Our visit will necessarily be short Mr. A—— being obliged to return the beginning of next Month—we therefore wish to be as short a time on the road...
After a most fatiguing journey in which I suffered grievously we arrived at half past nine o’clock last evening beaten and bruised and scarcely able to go through the additional trouble of undressing to go to bed—Not a single event has occurred worth detailing and I can only write you a short Letter as my shoulders are too stiff to admit of my saying any thing more than that we are alive and...