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    • Warren, Mercy Otis
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    • Adams, Abigail Smith

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Documents filtered by: Author="Warren, Mercy Otis" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith"
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As you my dear madam wrote last it may be my part according to the rules of Etiquette to Congratulate you on your perfect restoration to health, but the unceremonious friendly pen should be seized by the hand first able to hold it.— the similarity of our recent situation—tottering many months on the verge of the Grave, has been to my mind affecting indeed, when I have contemplated our next...
I cannot express to my dear Mrs. Adams the ardent desire I feel that we might at least have one more personal interview, before we are either of us called to leave the passing scenes of pleasure and pain, that have so long danced before us and vanished as the vapour of the morn. I long to have you by my side in my retired mansion at Plymouth, where we might indulge the feelings of the heart...
I am myself, my dear Madam, in great trouble—since my date of yesterday, my amiable son the Collector, unaccompanied by any man, was followed on the street by a ruffian neighbour, who after several scurrilous epithets of abuse, lifted his vulgar fist & gave him such a blow in his right eye that it appears doubtful whether he will again have the use of it.—This man, one Joseph Bartlett has been...
The inclosed was written with design to forward by your Son, who I then presumed would have returned to Quincy the last Saturday the 17th—Judge Adams call’d on me the day he came to Plymouth & delivered your agreeable favor—I have not seen him since—I did not know he was going to Barnstable—is he there still—or has he return’d by the route of N. Bedford or Bridgwater?—Surely, he would not have...
I cannot longer be silent while my friends are mourning the death of such a daughter as was our much loved Mrs Smith.—But why mourn?—She is happy and soon shall we also meet the termination of time, when, may we unite in the universal harmony of love and gratitude which attune the song of the righteous!— Mr Adams’s philosophic view of the changes of time and his belief in the sovereignty of...
With the same glow of affection which has for many years been cherished in my bosom, I received yours of the first Instt. and seldom indeed do I meet with any thing in the Letters of my Friend Mrs Adams that causes a moments uneasiness.—But I have been anxious since your last & more so since the arrival of this day’s Post least some accident may have happened to a valuable Packet which I was...
I did not my dear Mrs. Adams, write by yr Son when last in Plymouth, because I wished to retain the very valuable Letters of the American Minister at Petersburg, a little longer in my hand.—I wish’d my Son Winslow and his father to peruse them, which from sickness and other causes they could not do immediately.—I have not communicated them to any eye but those of my Son’s, though I think them...
The with in I prepared with design to forward by your Son on his return from Barnstable Court, but he passed with out calling upon me. Since which I have delayed to send it as Mrs. Otis informed me that you intended writing me soon.—When you put in execution the kind intention, you will let me know whether you have heard from Mrs. Smith since she reached her distant dwelling, as I shall always...
Though I have received no reply to my last, I interrupt Mrs. Adams again on a subject that lays near my heart.—It was reported to me yesterday that my beloved Mrs. Smith was again attacked by a dreadful malady which she has once surmounted:—and that apprehension of its fatal & speedy termination she has sent for her mother. When I receive an answer to the above enquiry I most ardently pray...
A token of Love & Friendship .—What can be more acceptable to a mind of Sensibility?— Your every friendly Letter under date Decr 30th came safely to hand with its inclosure, within a few days after date, and would have been earlier acknowledged, but for intervening circumstances needless to relate.— I shall with pleasure wear the ring, as a valuable expression of your regard;—nor, will it be...