You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Cranch, Mary Smith
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail Smith

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith"
Results 1-10 of 30 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I can never sufficiently thank you for your Letters. & the communications you so frequently Supply me with. I am consider’d as the fountain head from whence Couth truth is to be look’d for. I have read parts of your Letter’s till I have them by heart and can preach very well without notes now. Wherever I go I am scarcly welcome without I bring my pocket full of Letters. I was last week Several...
I too have taken my pen with the rising Sun. I have been so disturb’d with the Result of the allarming riot before your Door on the fast day evening that I have not had a moments queit sleep this night. I had no Idea the faction would have treid their Strength So oppenly. I suppos’d the Letters which had been thrown into your house were mear threats. but I hope they have but staid their time....
Vanity of vanity! & the conseiquenc of it is vexation of Spirit—Who ever is inclin’d to live beyond their income let them enter the House where plenty hospitality & an appearence of Wealth us’d to be display’d at the moment the mask is fallen of & they will behold a Scene of distress & woe enough to tear the heart of love & Friendship I have long suspected Doctor Welsh’s affairs were...
I yesterday receiv’d your kind Letter of the 18th my Sons and mrs Johnson to you. you cannot think my Sister how much pleasure they gave me I had one also from Nancy informing me that her Richard was broke out with the Small Pox & was like to do very well. he had about fifty Pustles & had been very Sick for two days before he broke out. mrs Cranch had inform’d me before of mr Johnsons...
Yours of May the 20th & 21d I receiv’d last Teusday, do not be impatient my Sister if I do not write twice a week always. I believe I often do—Others have a demand upon me also & grumble if I do not write frequently—you cannot think how much I do scribbile but there is not one of my correspondents that I owe so much to as to you nor one I write to so often—you are every way so thoughtful of...
your excellent Letter of the 26th of May I receiv’d a Saterday. I have heard or seen Something about this Book of Mr Robinson’s & have wish’d to read it. Tis about to be Printed in Boston. mr Kirkland tells me who preach’d here yesterday—you put it into right hands when you sent it to Doctor Belnap. this country will owe much Of their safety to the clergy. There is not to be found so much...
I have been at hard work this morning & my hands tremble so. I can scarcly hold my Pen, but if I do not write now I may be hindred as I was last post day & so not finish my letter to send till too late I was in the chaise for Boston yesterday at 6 aclock. I found my Friends well & Doctors Welsh’s Family gratified by your attention to Thomas. Mr Smith was bound for the payment of Tomas College...
I have at last heard from Atkinson. I had just sent a long Letter to sister when I receiv’d one from her & another from Cousin Betsy—Sister is full of anxiety about her daughter & well she may be—for by both the letters I think her in a fix’d consumtion. Her cough is better but her Fever runs high she has night Sweats & is so weak she can ride but a few miles in a day. Cousin Betsy says she...
I have had the House full of company for a week & have not been able to steal a moments to write to you or to my dear children at Washington.— I have receiv’d yours of the 8th & 13th of June together with one from my Son to you & one for Doctor Tufts which I deliver’d immediately into his hands as he was present when I receiv’d it. He is at your House two or three times a week & always finds...
Nothing but dire necessaty has prevented my writing as often as you could wish. I do not always think it necessary to give you a list of the avocations which forbids my taking my Pen, but you know what it is to have ranting Boys to make & mend for & young men to pull about & leave upon tables chairs &c Books papers & clothes: but I have no one to feel the propriety to keeping a house...