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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Project="Washington Papers"
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Your favour of Yesterday conveyed to me fresh proof of that friendship and attachment which I have happily experienced since the first of our acquaintance, and for which I entertain sentiments of the purest affection. It will ever constitute part of my happiness to know that I stand well in your opinion, because I am satisfied that you can have no views to answer by throwing out false colours,...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your two favors of the 19th and 23d February, and hasten to dispel those fears respecting Your Reputation, which are excited only by an uncommon degree of Sensibility—you seem to apprehend that censure proportioned to the disappointed expectations of the World, will fall on you in consequence of the failure of the Canadian Expedition—but in the first place,...
In pursuance of a Resolve of Congress of the 13th inst: a Copy of which is inclosed —I am to desire that you will without loss of time return to Camp, to resume the command of a division of this Army; and that you will communicate a similar order to Major General de Kalb. By the 2d Resolve of the same date you will see that I am impowered to remove Hazens or any other Regiment from the...
I received yesterday your favor of the 15th Instant, inclosing a paper, subscribed by Sundry Officers of General Woodford’s brigade, setting forth their reasons for not taking the Oath of Abjuration—Allegiance & Office, and thank you much for the cautious delicacy, used in communicating the matter to me. As every Oath should be a free act of the mind, founded on the conviction of the party of...
The detachment under your command with which you will immediately march towards the enemy’s lines is designed to answer the following purposes—to be a security to this camp and a cover to the country between the Delaware and Schuylkil—to interrupt the communication with Philadelphia—obstruct the incursions of the enemies parties, and obtain intelligence of their motions and designs. This last...
You are immediately to proceed with the detachment commanded by Genl Poor and form a junction as expeditiously as possible with that under the commanded of Genl Scott. You are to use the most effectual means for gaining the enemys left flank and rear, and giving them every degree of annoyance—all continental parties that are already on the lines will be under your command and you will take...
I received your favors of last night and this morning. I have given the most positive & pointed orders for provisions for your Detachment and am sorry that they have not arrived. In order that the Troops may be supplied, I wish you would always send up, an Active Officer in time to the Commissary, who might never leave him till he obtained the necessary supplies. This will be attended with...
Letter not found : to Lafayette, 26 June 1778. GW apparently wrote four letters to Lafayette on this date. The first , written in the morning , is printed above ; the second, written around 6:30 p.m., has not been found. In his third letter to Lafayette of this date, docketed 8:30 p.m., GW refers to “my Letter written about two Hours ago,” ordering Lafayette to march on Englishtown.
I have received your favor dated at half past four this afternoon, and must refer you to my Letter written about two Hours ago which in effect supersedes the necessity of a particular answer on the points contained in your present one. You will see by that, you are to move to Englishtown, after which it may be in our power to give you countenance & support in case of an Attack, or to cover...
General Lee’s uneasiness on account of yesterday’s transaction rather increasing than abating, and your politeness in wishing to ease him of it, has induced me to detach him from this Army, with a part of it, to reinforce, or at least cover, the several detachments under your command, at present. At the same time that I felt for General Lee’s distress of mind, I have had an eye to your wishes,...
I have received your letter on the subject of the corps raising by Col: Armand. You are sensible that it rests solely with Congress to determine the existence of a new corps and decide in an affair of this nature, If they should think proper to give their sanction to Col. Armand in the business he is engaged in, and in which by your representation he has made so considerable a progress, I...
You are to have the immediate command of that detatchment from this Army which consists of Glovers and Varnums Brigades and the detatchment under the command of Colo. Henry Jackson. You are to march them with all convenient expedition and by the best Routs to Providence in the State of Rhode Island—When there, you are to subject yourself to the orders of Major Genl Sullivan who will have the...
This will be delivered you by Major General Greene, whose thorough knowlege of Rhode Island, of which he is a native, and the influence he will have with the people, put it in his power to be particularly useful in the expedition against that place; as well in providing necessaries for carrying it on, as in assisting to form and execute a plan of operations proper for the occasion. The honor...
I had, last Night, the pleasure of receiving yours of the 28th dated at saybrook. I hope your next will inform me of your arrival at Providence, and of your having seen the Count D’Estaings Fleet off the Harbour of Newport, an event, of which I am most anxious to hear. The inclosed letters were recd from Philada by Express. I am Dear Marquis with the greatest Regard Yr most obt & humble Servt....
Your favor of the 6th Instt which came to my hands yesterday, afforded a fresh proof of the noble principles on which you act, and has a just claim to my sincere & hearty thanks. The common cause, of which you have been a Zealous supporter would I know, be benefitted by Genl Greene’s presence at Rhode Island, as he is a native of that State—has an interest with the People—and a thorough...
This Letter will be delivered to you by Monsr Laneville, to whom, I have no doubt, you will shew civility, as he appears to me to be a Gentn of sense & science. I hope, however, he will come too late to afford you any aid—I say so, because I could wish he may find the work already done, of which, I have some hope from Genl Sullivans last Letter. I have lately received a horse for you from...
I have been honored with your favor of the 25th Ulto by Monsr Pontgebaud and wish my time, which at present is taken up by a Comee of Congress, would permit me to go fully into the contents of it—this, however is not in my power to do. But in one word, let me say, I feel every thing that hurts the sensibility of a Gentleman; and, consequently, upon the present occasion, feel for you & for our...
Since my last to you, I have been honoured with your several favors of the 1st 3d & 21st of this month. The two first came to hand before I left the white plains—& the last at this place—I should not have Delayed acknowledging the receipt of the 1st & 3d till this time—(thereby neglecting to pay that just tribute of respect which is due to you) but for the close attention I was obliged to...
I have had the pleasure of receiving, by the hands of Monsr de la Colombe, your favour of the 28th Ulto; accompanied by one of the 24th, which he overtook somewhere on the Road. The leave requested in the former, I am as much interested to grant, as to refuse my approbation of the Cartel, proposed in the latter. The generous Spirit of Chivalry, exploded by the rest of the World, finds a...
This will be accompanied by a letter from Congress, which will inform you, that a certain expedition, after a full consideration of all circumstances has been laid aside —I am sorry however for the delay it has occasioned you by remaining so long undecided. I am persuaded My Dear Marquis, there is no need of fresh proofs to convince you either of my affection for you personally or of the high...
I am mortified exceedingly that my Letter from Philadelphi⟨a,⟩ with the several inclosures, did not reach Boston before your departure from that Port—It was written as soon as Congress had come to a decision upon the several matters which became the subject of the Presidents Letter to you, & was committed (for conveyance) to the Messenger who was charged with his dispatches to that place—how...
Mr Mason who will have the honor of presenting this letter to you is the Son of a Gentn of family fortune and influence in the state of Virginia—one who is a warm & zealous supporter of the rights of Mankind—and a particular friend of mine. Want of health induces the young Gentn to travel, to see how far this blessing will be restored by a change of climate—to Montpelier, most probably, he...
Since my last which was written (to the best of my recollection for not having my Papers with me I cannot have recourse to dates) in March both Armies continued quiet in their winter cantonments till about the first of May when a detachmt of abt 2000 of the Enemy under the command of General Matthew convoyed by Sir George Collier made a sudden invasion of a Neck of land comprehending...
Often, since you left this Country have I written to you, but have not been favoured with a single line from you since you lay in Boston harbour. this I shall ascribe to any cause rather than a decline of friendship. I feel my own regard for you so sensibly, that I shall never suspect a want of it in your breast. I intended to have wrote you a very long letter by Monsr Gerard whom I have been...
A few days ago I wrote you a letter in much haste. the cause a sudden notification of Monsr Gerards having changed the place of his embarkation from Boston (as was expected) to Philadelphia, & the hurry Monsir de la Colombe was in to reach the latter before the Minister should have left it. Since that, I have been honourd with the company of the Chevr de la Luzerne, & by him was favourd with...
On the 30th of last Month I wrote you a letter which in point of length, would almost extend from hence to Paris—It was to have been borne to you by Colo. Fleury, to whom the relation of some particulars was referred; but the advice of Count D’Estaings arrival at Georgia—& the hope given us by Congress of seeing him at New York has induced this Officer to suspend his voyage to go in pursuit of...
Your polite and obliging letter of the 10th of Octr from Havre came to my hands since the begin[nin]g of this Month —It filled me with a pleasure intermixed with pain—To hear that you were well—to find you breathing the same affection[at]e sentiments that ever have most conspicuously markd your conduct towards me & that you continued to deliver them with unabated attachmt contributes greatly...
Your welcome favour of the 27th of April came to my hands yesterday —I received it with all the joy that the sincerest friendship could dictate—and with that impatience which an ardent desire to see you could not fail to inspire. I am sorry I do not know your rout through the State of New York, that I might, with certainty, send a small party of Horse (all I have at this place) to meet &...
At length my Dear Marquis I am become a private citizen on the banks of the Potomac, & under the shadow of my own Vine & my own Fig tree, free from the bustle of a camp & the busy scenes of public life, I am solacing myself with those tranquil enjoyments, of which the Soldier who is ever in pursuit of fame—the Statesman whose watchful days & sleepless Nights are spent in devising schemes to...
I have no expectation, that this Letter will find you in France. Your favor of Novr to me, & of Deer to Congress, both announce your intention of making us a visit this Spring. On this hope I shall fully rely, & shall ardently long for the moment in which I can embrace you in America. Nothing could add more to the pleasure of this interview than the happiness of seeing Madame la Fayette with...