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Mr Loring having been sent by Sir Henry Clinton to meet Mr Boudinot or any other person appointed by me for the purpose of effecting an exchange of prisoners; I have therefore to desire you (Mr Boudinot being absent from Camp) to hear any proposals Mr Loring may have to offer on this subject; and to do definitively whatever may be necessary towards the execution of a general exchange of...
The only material intelligence which I have obtained from New York or respecting the Enemy since your departure, is contained in the inclosed account, which I received yesterday from Captain Monroe. This in your communications with His Excellency Count D’Estaing, you will be pleased to shew him. As we shall have occasion for a great many boats, in case a cooperation between the Count & us...
I have been favored with Colonel Hamilton’s letter, mentioning your arrival early on the 11th at Philadelphia; and your being about to set off for Lewis town the morning on which it was written. I have attentively considered the object to which you more particularly refer, and am now to authorise you (provided the Count will not determine on a co-operation to the full extent of my...
In my Letters of the 10th & 18th I transmitted All the intelligence I had obtained, respecting the Enemy from the time of your departure to those two periods; and, by the present conveyance, I enclose You an Extract of a Letter from Major General Gates of the 15th. —By this you will perceive he was fully persuaded, that the Enemy were preparing to evacuate Rhode Island—and he expected, from...
I have just now received a letter from Col. Hamilton, mentioning your having changed your position of Lewis Town, for that of little Egg harbour, and that you would write me more fully on your arrival at the furnace. In my last I informed you that the enemy had evacuated both their posts at Kings-ferry, since which no alteration has taken place, that has come to my knowlege. Things at Rhode...
I inclose You an Extract of a Letter of the 26th which General Greene has just received from Mr Bowen D.Q.M. Genl, dated in New port, announcing the evacuation of Rhode Island by the Enemy on Monday night last. The intelligence is not to be doubted, although by some means or another it has happened, that I have not received any advices from Genl Gates upon the subject, or a Letter from him...
I have this day been favd with yours of the 26th ulto informing me of your removal to Great Egg Harbour. My letter of the 18th, which had not reached you, went, as you supposed, by way of Philada, and lest any accident may have happened to it, I inclose you a duplicate —Mine of the 30th ulto, which went thro’ Major Lee, informed you of the evacuation of Rhode Island: I have since recd a letter...
Since mine of yesterday I have received another letter from my confidential correspondent in New York dated the 29th ulto. He informs me that the 57th Regt Rawdons Corps and the Artillery mentioned in his last, were to sail on that day for Hallifax, and with them all the heavy ships of War except the Europa. The Daphne Frigate, with Sir George Collier and Colo. Stewart on board, was to sail...
Being absent from Head Qrs on a visit to the several Outposts of the Army, when your favor of the 2d Instant arrived—and not returning till last night—it was not in my power to answer it before. I am precisely in the predicament you are—with respect to the Count—his intentions or ultimate operations. I have not heard a single syllable about either since your departure, except what was...
I have been favoured with your letter of the 25th of November by Major Farlie. Sincerely do I wish that the several State Societies had, or would; adopt the alterations that were recommended by the General meeting in May 1784. I then thought, and have had no cause since to change my opinion, that if the Society of the Cincinnati mean to live in peace with the rest of their fellow Citizens,...