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Mr White presented me with your favour of the 27th Ulto —you may rely upon it, that any Civilities which may be in my power to shew this young Gentleman shall not be wanting—if an acquaintance of mine, for whom I have wrote to Virginia (knowing his promptitude to business) should not come, as there is reason to doubt, I propose to take Mr White into my Family as an Aid de Camp—the mode by...
Having received information that there is a number of arms at one Wilseys at the Fish Kilns, among the Officers Baggage which came from St Johns, I request and authorize you to make inquiry about them & to secure all you can find. I am Sir Your Most Hble Servt LS , in Robert Hanson Harrison’s writing, PAeTPM ; LB , DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . Although Clinton had held the rank of...
Two ships of force with their Tenders have Sailed up Hudsons River —I am apprehensive that they design to seize the passes in the Highlands by Land wh[ich] I am informed may be done by a small body of Men. I must therefore request you instantly to desire Genl Ten Broeck to March down as great force as he can Collect to secure them, particularly the post where the Road runs over Anthonies nose...
I am favoured with yours of the 15th Instt—The Measures you have taken & directed in Consequence of the 2 Men of War passing up the North River appear to me extremely prudent & proper. The Spirit of the Militia too upon this Occasion & at so critical a Period deserves the highest Commendation. As it is impossible for me to judge with Certainty what the Intentions of the Enemy are or even to...
Yours of the 23d Instant is duly Received and am pleased with the timely notice of your Situation, Strength Movements, &c. &c. & think time is not to be lost, or expence regarded in getting yourselves in the best posture of Defence, not knowing how soon the Enemy may attempt to pass You. The fire Rafts you mention are not of the best Construction, but probably are the best that can be procured...
Yours of the 2d Instant is duly Received enclosed you have a Resolution of the provincial Convention which came to hand last Evening, by which you will please to Regulate your Conduct, I must beg you to Inform Me as soon as possible what number your Brigade now consists of—and what number it will contain when a fourth part of the Militia are drafted agreeable to Order of provincial Congress....
Take with you Lieut. Colo. and proceed immediately to Fairfield and there in Consultation with General Lincoln of the Massachusets Bay, Mr Hobart of this State and Lieut. Colo. Livingston if you can meet with him, concert an Expedition to Long Island for the purpose of aiding the Inhabitants removing or destroying the Stock, Grain, &ca which must otherwise fall into the Hands of the Enemy....
Let me beseech you to nominate, & set four Gentlemen, such as you conceive will make good Captains to Raising Companies upon the Continental pay & establishment; and to be annexed hereafter to one of the Sixteen additional Regiments. I shall also leave the nomination of the Subaltern Officers for these Companies to yourself and the Captains—all I ask is, that they may be Gentlemen—and that...
Altho’ I have not the least doubt of your Zeal and Activity, I cannot help reminding you of the Necessity there is, for your raising and bringing into Service, as expeditiously as possible, the Body of Men, of which your State have given you the command. I am clearly of opinion that the Enemy are collecting their force, with an intent to make a Stroke at this Army, which they will never suffer...
I was favd with yrs of the 21st Inst. on Yesterday. Much depends on our taking the Field early with a powerfull force, by which means Victory over the Enemy in the distressed Situation they must be from the severity of this Campain will be certain, & our Affairs will be on so good a footing before any considerable Reinforcement can come to them, that We shall have but little to dread—I am...
Information being lodged that many of the Inhabitants living near the Passaick Falls are busily employed in removing their provision & Forrage within the Enemy’s reach, with design of supplying them, obliges me to beg the favr of you to let me know what Success you have experienced in collecting the Troops voted by the Convention of the State of New York. The presence of some men in that...
Your favour of the 23d February was duly handed me; and I am thankful for the attention and activity, with which you are promoting the public service. As you have all the circumstances immediately before you, you can best judge whether the cannon, of which you speak, will be most useful to defend the obstructions which are forming, or at the places where they now are; and you will be pleased...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. George Clinton, 19 Mar. 1777. The collection of letters and documents belonging to the estate of James Gordon Bennett that was sold by the Anderson Galleries of New York on 23 Nov. 1926 reportedly contained a letter signed by GW at Morristown on 19 Mar. “regarding appointments of officers” ( American Book-Prices Current , 33 [1927], 797).
A Captain who escaped from New York on Saturday Evening and who arrived here this morning, informs, that about Three Thousand Troops (British & Hessians) were embarked from the City & Staten Island when he came away. It was generally said, they had in contemplation an expedition to Chesepeak Bay and to make a descent on the Eastern Shore. There were some who conjectured, they mean to go up the...
Your favour of the 18th instant has just now come to hand. Two days ago, I wrote to general McDougall urging it upon him to apply to the Convention of your state in my name to call out the Militia, in order to have as respectable a force as possible, in the quarter where you are to act according to contingencies. I am glad to find that the powers vested in you, have enabled you to anticipate...
By a person sent into Brunswic I am informed that “Genl Skinners Force consists of about 1000 to be joined by some regular Troops and to proceed from Bergen thro’ Sussex and the back parts of the Jerseys when the Troops march for Philada.” I think this Move so probable, as it will give them access to a part of the Country most notoriously disaffectd, that I desire you will post a Body of...
I wrote you on the 23d Inst. communicating Intelligence lately received respecting the Enemy’s designs up the North River—A letter from Genl McDougall this moment received, places their Intentions beyond the power of misconception —Several Transports have anchored at Dob’s ferry—& mean, in my Opinion, to divert our Attention, if possible, from their Movements towards the Delaware—At any rate...
The necessity of having regular Magazines of Provision for subsisting the Army, wheresoever It may act, and the late destruction of the Stores at Danbury, have induced Congress to take the matter into consideration & to come into the Resolves which accompany this. By these you will perceive, that One object of their deliberation was, to have immediate measures taken for the removal of the...
I am favoured with yours of the 1st instant by Capt: Lush, with Copies of the proceedings of the Courts Martial upon the case of Capt: Martin and those of Several persons accused of treasonable practices. As the proceedings against the latter, can be only sent for my opinion, I having no right to interfere in the matter, I would recommend the execution only of the most notorious, and such,...
Your favor of 4th Inst. I receiv’d this Morning —As the Movement of the Enemy & their Designs are as yet uncertain, I have to request that you will keep as large a Body of the Militia as you can collect, & have them in as good order as Circumstances will permit, in case Genl Howe should Incline up North River[.] I have no doubt but you have form’d such a Plan with General Heard as will best...
I was favor’d with yours of the 19th Instant & have to acknowledge my approbation of the removal of the two Companys you mention, to the Post near Sidman’s Bridge. you have also my consent to keep Colonel Duboys’ regiment with you it is certainly preferable to any, other, being as you observe perfectly acquainted with the Grounds; which is a singular advantage to any Body of Troops when...
From intelligence just received from the Northward; there can be little doubt that the enemy are operating against Ticonderoga and its dependencies; and from the evacuation of the Jerseys, and the reason of the thing itself, there can be as little room to doubt, that General Howe will cooperate with the Northern army, and make a sudden descent upon Peeks Kill, in order, if possible to get...
I have this moment receiv’d your Favor of the 11th Inst. by Mr Conoly, & from your recommendation have not the least Objection that he should be appointed to one of the Lieutenancies you mention; provided it can be done without any just cause of offence to the other Officers of that Corps—If these Commissions have ever been granted, & the Officers by Resignation or otherwise quit the Regiment,...
Yours of Yesterday reached me at this place. Considering the situation in which you say the hard Bread is, instead of bringing it forward, I have directed Genl Sullivan’s and Lord Stirlings divisions to draw three days each before they leave King’s Ferry. If any remains after supplying them, it may be sent back to the Forts. Whether the Enemy’s real design’s are southward or Eastward, in order...
I had proceeded thus far in order to look out for a proper place to arrange the Army when I recd the provoking account that the Enemy’s Fleet left the Capes of Delaware yesterday and steered Eastward again. I shall return again with the utmost expedition to the North River, but as a sudden stroke is certainly intended by this Maneuvre, I beg you will immediately call in every Man of the...
I this day received your Favor of the 9th Inst. your Vigilance in providing a proper Force to oppose the Enemy and the Alacrity with which the Militia have assembled afford me great Satisfaction; if your Efforts are seasonably and skilfully seconded by your Eastern Neighbours we may hope that General Bourgoyne will find it equally difficult to make a farther Progress or to effect a Retreat....
Your favour of the 13th with the inclosed Papers are before me. I wish the accounts of the two actions near Fort Schuyler had been more clear and intelligible than they are, as more Dependence could then be placed on the Authenticity of the Particulars, and a stronger assurance formed of the advantages being as fully on our side as they are there represented. If the Loss of some of their most...
Your favor of the 12th instant was delivered me last night. I recollect, that Permission was granted Mrs Hatfield to visit her Husband, & had not the least Doubt, but she would be suffered to return whenever she had an Inclination, unless some singular Circumstances should render it ineligible for a Day or two. Her Detention seems to be by the Mayor, to whom she was referred for a Passport. As...
I was this day honored with yours of the 9th containing a full account of the Storm of Forts Montgomery and Clinton. Genl Putnam had given me information of the loss two days before, but not in so full and ample a manner. It is to be regretted that so brave a resistance did not meet with a suitable reward. You have however the satisfaction of knowing that every thing was done that could...
Your favor of the 20th I received Yesterday afternoon, and feel much for the havoc and devastion committed by the Enemy employed on the North River. Their Maxim seems to be, to destroy where they cannot conquer, and they hesitate not, to pursue a conduct that would do dishonor to the Arms of the most savage Barbarians. I know your feelings upon the occasion, and regret, that you were not in a...
The importance of the North River in the present contest and the necessity of defending It, are Subjects so well understood and so familiar to you, that it is needless for me to enlarge upon them. I therefore only mean to mention, that no exertions can be too great to render it secure against any future attempts of the Enemy, and that the present opportunity should be improved to effect it, as...
It is with great reluctance, I trouble you on a subject, which does not properly fall within your province; but it is a subject that occasions me more distress, than I have felt, since the commencement of the war; and which loudly demands the most zealous exertions of every person of weight and authority, who is interested in the success of our affairs —I mean the present dreadful situation of...
I am honored with yours of the 5th instant, and cannot sufficiently express my thanks for your attention to my letter of the 16th Feby. I have the pleasure to inform you, that by the exertions of our friends in different quarters the Army has been pretty well supplied since, and I hope will continue to be so, if proper steps are taken by the present Commissaries, or if there should be a change...
I am favd with yours of the 8th instant inclosing a letter from you to Congress upon the subject of Affairs in the North River department. I agree perfectly with you as to the propriety of drawing every man down the River except the garrison of Fort Schuyler and have backed your opinion forcibly with my own. I cannot think it was the intention of Congress to make the command of the Forts...
In the affair of Princetown the winter before last, a box was taken from the enemy, which by appearances was supposed to contain a quantity of hard money. It was put into a small ammunition cart, on the spur of the occasion and has since disappeared. I am informed there were some suspicions at the time against one Crane, a Capt. Lieutenant in the artillery—who, it was imagined had converted...
On monday I received your favor of the 22d Inst. I should be extremely sorry if the incursions you apprehend, should take place. From the defeats and disappointments the Indians met with the last campaign, when pushed on and supported by a formidable regular Army, we had reason to hope, that they would remain peaceable, at least for some time. However there is no reasoning with precision from...
Some days ago I received your favor of the 8th Inst., and am much obliged by the measures you have taken to recover the Box. I am happy to find by a Letter from General Schuyler of the 22d, which came to hand last night, that the Indian Nations, which had discovered an unfriendly disposition, seem to be well affected and to afford grounds to hope for a friendly alliance between us. If this can...
I do myself the honor to inclose you a letter which Mr Morris sent open for my inspection. I shall only add that the mode of promotion which he points out is exactly conformable to the Rule established by a Board of General Officers on the 29th October last. It is absolutely necessary that some fixed principles should be settled for regulating promotions, and it would be attended by the most...
The first division of the Army moved from hence this morning, about four Miles, to give room to the second. They will reach Kakiate tomorrow evening, and the North River the next day. I shall halt the remainder hereabouts a few days, to refresh the Men. I am yet undetermined as to the expediency of throwing the Army immediately over the North River. I will state my reasons for hesitating, and...
I have been favd with yours of yesterday, and soon after, Genl Gates transmitted me letters from Colo. Ethan Allen to Genl Stark and himself upon the same subject. I plainly perceive, that this matter is likely to be productive of a serious dispute between the State of New York and the inhabitants of Vermont, and therefore, I do not chuse to give any determination. I shall transmit the whole...
I was last Night favd with yours, communicating the distressing accounts of the Ravages of the Indians upon the frontier of this State. I wish it were in my power to afford an adequate Releif, but as you are well acquainted with our force, and with what we have to oppose, I am certain you will think that I have done every thing possible. Colo. Butler having shifted his ground before my orders...
Mr Benson having signified to me, that you would stand in need of a flag to conduct some persons to the enemy’s lines on the 19th instant; I am to inform Your Excellency, that an officer will attend at Fish Kill on the day appointed to receive and execute the orders, which shall be given him for that purpose. I have the honor to be With the greatest respect Sir, Your most Obedt servt LS , in...
By a letter received this day from Colonel Malcom I learn that the time of service for which the militia in the Highlands is engaged is very near expiring. I am to request you will be pleased to order out a relief of from 500 to 1000 as expeditiously as possible. Besides the call for them to carry on the defences of the river, there is at this juncture an additional necessity for their...
I am extremely sorry that it is in my power to inform you, that a Captain Colson of the 5th Virginia Regiment a few days ago, violently wounded a Mr Vantassel of this State, of which he died in a little time after —The moment I was apprised of it, I directed a Letter to be written & sent to Genl Muhlenburg, to whose Brigade he belonged, to have him secured, in order that he might be delivered...
I have been honoured with yours of the 20th and 24th instants; the latter by Mr Harkermir who gives a melancholy account of the distresses of the inhabitants at the German Flatts. To defend an extensive frontier against the incursions of a desultory Enemy is next to impossible; but still if you think the addition of another Regiment, ill as I can spare it, or a change of position in the troops...
Capt. Machin has been employed since the year 1776 in the engineering Branch, without ever coming to any regular settlement for his Services. He does not chuse to fix any price himself, and I am really ignorant of what is just and proper. You have been a witness of a good deal of his work, and he is willing to submit the matter to your decision. Captain Machin holds a Commission in the...
I recd yours of yesterday inclosing a letter from General Nixon and a deposition respecting the abuse of several inhabitants of this State by some Officers of the Army. I shall immediately order the Officers to be secured untill Civil process shall issue against them. A flag Boat was standing up the River yesterday, with directions to proceed as far as Fishkill landing to take off the family...
I am favd with yours of the 15th containing the disagreeable account of the further ravages committed by the Indians. I will immediately order one Regiment to be held ready for the frontier service, and if, upon making a general arrangement of the Army, I find that more can be spared, I will make an addition to the number. As I am unacquainted with the direction of Anaquaga I shall be obliged...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency yesterday, requesting your advice on the proposed expedition against Anaquaga. I have given Col. Cortland orders to get his regiment well clad, and prepared without delay, for this purpose, and to wait upon you himself to consult you fully on the most expeditious mode of proceeding and the previous measures proper to be taken. If the troops already...
I received your Excellency’s favour of yesterday in the Evening—Previous to that, I had written you a second letter on the subject of the expedition to Anaquaga; informing you, among other particulars, that Col. Cortlandts regiment was immediately to proceed to Poughkepsie and that the Col. himself would wait upon you to consult you fully on the measures proper to be taken. The representation...