George Washington Papers
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From George Washington to George Clinton, 10 June 1779

To George Clinton

Head Quarters [Smiths Clove, N.Y.]
June 10th [17]79.

Dr Sir,

I am honored with your Excellency’s favour of yesterday by Colo. Malcolm, who has communicated to me the particulars with which you charged him1—I beg leave to refer you to my letter of yesterday which I hope you have received.2 In that, sensible of the inconvenience of keeping out the militia at this season of the year, I anticipated your wish for their discharge, with my warmest acknowlegements for the zeal and alacrity they have discoverd on the present interesting occasion. I have the honor to be With the truest sentiments of respect & esteem Yr Excellys Most Obedt ser.

Go: Washington

LS, in Alexander Hamilton’s writing, MiU-C: Schoff Collection.

1Clinton and Col. William Malcom exchanged letters on 7 June with remarks on militia dismissal. Malcom’s letter, written from “Camp near Fort Montgomery,” N.Y., reads: “Three hundred Troops are just joind from G’l Washington. The principal part of the militia are gone. Shall I discharge the rest. They will go tomorrow, & several political reasons urge the propriety of dissmissing them in form. . . . it will proclaim the Strength of our regular army &c &c. . . . The militia officers are anxious for the answer to this” (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:49–50). Clinton’s reply, written from “Camp Highlands,” N.Y., reads: “Maj’r Boyd left me this morning. I communicated my sentiments to him so fully respect’g the Dismission of the Militia & other Matters mentioned in your Letter that I doubt not when you have conversed with him you will conceive it unnecessary for me to add another word on the Subject. I would however wish if possible that the militia sh’d be detained for a Day or two longer” (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:50).

2Writing from Camp Highlands, N.Y., on 10 June, Clinton acknowledged this letter from GW in a reply that reads: “I am honored with your Excellency’s Letter of Yesterday and agree with you in the Propriety of dismissing the Militia and delay it only until I can have an Opportunity of apprizing Genl McDougal of my Intention” (LS, DLC:GW). GW’s aide-de-camp Alexander Hamilton docketed Clinton’s letter: “no answer required.”

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