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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Project="Washington Papers"
Results 1311-1320 of 9,139 sorted by editorial placement
I take the liberty of soliciting your notice in the distribution of offices in the Executive Department of Government—If your Excellency, and the Honorable Senate should think me qualified to serve the United States in that Department, in the State of Maryland, I flatter myself my conduct in the office, I may be appointed to, will not discredit the choice. I beg permission to refer your...
I request Your Excellency’s indulgence for troubling You with the perusal of the enclosed Letters—two of them are of a publick Nature, and Contain much information respecting Indian Affairs in the Southern Country; they merit attention—the third is of a private Nature from Judge Drayton, who I believe is known to You; He is a Man of Abilities, and real information in His profession—I shoud...
Sentiments expressed by the President to the Committee from the Senate appointed to confer with him on the mode of Communication between the President and the Senate respecting Treaties and Nominations. In all matters respecting Treaties, oral communications seem indispensably necessary—because in these a variety of matters are contained, all of which not only require consideration, but some...
The disappointment which I fear Mr Thompson will undergo grieves me very much as it is on my Account he is so much involved in Debt, better had I received no Encouragement to get any Articles & I to have went naked home with Mr Cotoney, than I to involve him in such a Debt & no likelihood of his desolving it unless through your Assistance. If you conceived the pain I feel when I hear that the...
I was the last night honoured by the receipt of your Excellencys commission appointing me collector for the port of Boston —It shall be my study early to obtain, a perfect knowledge of the duties of the office and my constant care so to discharge them as thereby to secure the approbation of my own mind and the confidence of my country. No circumstance could be more pleasing than the one which...
Consequent of the enclosed resolution, I had a conference with the Commee therein named yesterday, when I expressed the Sentiments which you also have enclosed. I was assured by the Committee, that the only object the Senate had in view was to be informed of the mode of communication which would be most agreeable to the President, and that a perfect acquiescence would be yielded thereto. But I...
The Petition of John Beck of the City of New York Humbly sheweth That your petitioners parents were well affected to the American cause and during the late war were robbed and plundered and greatly distressed by the Enemy at New Haven in the state of Connecticut. The petitioners parents are at present in very indigent circumstances, and advanced in years; And wholly unable to render him any...
I thank you for giving me the perusal of ⟨the⟩ enclosed Letters. The business respecting t⟨he⟩ Indians is now before Congress. It would be well if ⟨the⟩ information concerning fugitive Negros co⟨uld⟩ come forward specifically—Judge Draytons name shall be placed among those who will come under consideration whe⟨n⟩ nominations for the Judiciary are taken up —and I am Sir Yr Most Obedt & Most...
I have received your very obliging and affectionate Letter of the 19th Ulto and can assure you that no circumstance, amidst the numerous occurrences of my new and arduous employment, has given me more heartfelt satisfaction than the repeated testimonies of approbation which my conduct in accepting of the Presidency of these United Stats has drawn from every quarter, and particularly from those...
Sentiments deliver’d by the President at a second conference with the Senate—held The President has the “power by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make Treaties and to appoint Offices.” The Senate when these powers are exercised, is evidently a Council only to the President, however its concurrence may be to his Acts—It seems incident to this relation between them that not...