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I mentioned in my last that our Senators were chosen—This common wealth has been divided into Eight districts each having a right to chuse one representative to the general Government. Each town was directed to return the name of two persons for electors of President & vice President from the two highest in each district the General court are to chuse one this will make Eight and two are to be...
I received your letter of the 26th Ultmo, yesterday, with the inclosures—I assure you, that I am sensible of the indulgence you have continually afforded to my Father’s Estate and of your present offer to extend it: But so sensible, also, am I, of the great difficulty in raising cash at present, and so anxious am I to adjust the claims against the Estate, that I shall take the price fixed on...
The peregrination of the day in which I parted with you, ended at Marlbro’: the next day, bad as it was, I got home before dinner. In the moment of our separation upon the road as I travelled, & every hour since—I felt all that love, respect & attachment for you, with which length of years, close connexion & your merits, have inspired me. I often asked myself, as our Carriages distended,...
4[Diary entry: 18 October 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 18th. Thermometer at 60 in the Morning—70 at Noon and 70 at Night. Cloudy morning with great appearances of Rain all the forenoon and a little sprinkle of it—but clear warm and pleasant in the Afternoon. Went up to Alexandria agreeably to a summons to give evide. in the Suit between the Estate of Mr. Custis & Robt. Alexander, but the latter not appearing nothing was done & I returned...
Letter not found: to Clement Biddle, 28 Oct. 1786. On 5 Nov. Biddle wrote GW : “I have your Esteemed favour of 28th ulto.”
6[Diary entry: 2 August 1786] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 2d. Mercury at 65 in the Morning—70 at Noon and 70 at N. Much rain had fallen in the Night. The day was variable, but generally cloudy with fine rain about 10 or 11 Oclock which lasted more than an hour—after which the Sun came out but for a short duration. Rid to Muddy hole, but proceeded no further as, at the time I was there the appearances of a wet day were greatest.
As the Convention of the States is expected to meet in this City in the next Month, I make bold to request your influence with such Gentlemen of your acquaintance as may want Accommodations. I have fitted up Chambers in the most convenient manner, and am certain that they will find it more agreeable than any private Lodging House in Town, as they will always have more Attendants, should their...
8[Diary entry: 27 January 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 27th. Thermometer at 30 in the Morning— at Noon and at Night. Clear and pleasant all day; Wind at No. West in the forenoon and Eastwardly afterwards, but not much of it. Mrs. Washington set out after breakfast for Abingdon—to see Mrs. Stuart who is ill. I rid to my Mill and to the Plantation at Dogue run—also to the places where the Muddy hole & ferry people were at Work. Mr. Shaw...
The house of Representatives want Yet four members and the Senate two. The first will not be formed until Monday, and the senate probably not untill Wednesday next the first of April. Colo. Hanson of Alexandria is so good as to take charge of the cloth sent you from the Hartford manufactory, and also of some federal buttons manufactored in this City, both of which will I hope safely reach you....
Mrs Bingham has done me the honor to deliver me your Letter of the 15 March with the Seal you have been so polite as to present to me—and for which you will please to accept my thanks I could only wish the object had been more worthy the great talents shewn in the invention and execution of the Seal. You will however believe that I feel my self extremely flattered by this mark of attention and...
AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see Farm Reports, 6–12 Dec. 1789, source note . A balk is a ridge or strip of ground left unplowed as a boundary between two furrows. Root of scarcity ( Beta vulgaris or mangel-wurzel) is a coarse beet grown primarily as cattle fodder. For additional information on GW’s cultivation of this plant, see Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds....
Your favor of the 13th Current did not come to hand till the day before Yesterday, I fear I shall fail in geting you the Poland Oat —some have been Offered, but they were so much degenerated that they Appeared no better than the Common Oat, & the price 25 Ct higher I have procured 200 Bushels of the Common Oat of the best Quality & well Cleaned & You may send for them or any part you Want, on...
As soon as I had the honor of receiving your Letter containing a proposal of the order of the Knights of Divine Providence; I referred the subject of it to the decision of Congress, in my letter to that august Body dated the 28th of August last, a copy of which is enclosed. Whereupon the United States in Congress assembled, were pleased to pass their Act of the 5th Inst: which is properly...
14[Diary entry: 8 November 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 8th. Thermometer at 52 in the Morning—62 at Noon and 62 at Night. Clear all day, with the Wind high from the No. Wt. Went up to Alexandria, agreeably to a summons, to give testimony in the Suit depending between the Estate of Mr. Custis and Mr. Robt. Alexander. Returned by the New Barn which had got about half the Rafters up. Found Mrs. Stuart, Miss Stuart, and all Mrs. Stuarts...
I am honored with your favor of the 17th. Altho’ the greater part of the Cargo of the Ship Pallas is advertised for public Sale on the 1st of October next, it is not a matter of certainty that it will be disposed of in that manner—at least the whole of it. At any rate—I expect it will fall in a great degree under my Management, as Mr O’Donnell the Owner, who is a perfect Stranger in this...
It was the desire of the Revd Dr Gordon who, a few days ago, embarked for Europe, that according to his own practice I would weekly send to you the Independent Chronicle printed in this Town. I have the honor of enclosing one of the Papers for your Excellency at this time; requesting you to permit me to assure you that it will afford me very great satisfaction to continue so to do in a regular...
At a meeting of the Officers of the Continental line in October last to appoint officers of the State Society of Cincinnati; It was there resolv’d, that no officer not holding a Continental Commission should be entitled to become a member —As I saw it in a different light from the Gentlemen that compos’d that Body; I beg leave to lay before your Excellency the State & progress, of the Regiment...
18[Diary entry: 17 February 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 17th. Thermometer at 38 in the Morning—52 at Noon and 48 at Night. A thick fog till 9 oclock A.M. when it dispelled; was clear and pleasant till towards Sunsetting when the western horison seemed to cloud & lower. Wind Southerly all day but the ground very wet—Snow all dissolved where the Sun had access. Rid to my Mill, and the Plantations at Muddy hole, Dogue Run & ferry. Sent for...
I had proposed writing by the present opportunity, before I received your letter of Jany the 1st on tuesday last. Return you my most sincere thanks for your good wishes. The second volume will be printed off I expect by the end of the week after next. The first begins with the settlement of the several colonies, & comes down to & takes in the Lexington engagement. The second finishes with the...
The enclosed letter from the clerk of the H. Delegates will inform you that the marquess’s thanks to the assembly have been presented. The resolution directing the Bust was order’d to be carried into execution by the commercial agent who was soon after dismiss’d from office, it never came to my hands till I sent for it yesterday, I will endeavour to have it comply’d with tho’ like other...
21[Diary entry: 25 February 1788] (Washington Papers)
Monday 25th. Thermometer at 32 in the Morning—48 at Noon and 46 at Night. Calm and clear Morning. Wind Southerly afterwards which occasioned a considerable thaw. Mr. Fairfax going away directly after breakfast I rid to the Plantations in the Neck—at Muddy hole and Dogue run. At the first (that is the Neck) the Women were grubbing & fencing along the Creek. At Muddy hole doing the same. The...
The letter which you did me the honor to write to me on the 16th of October only came to hand the 28th of last month. My particular acknowledgments are due to you for your recollection of and attention to me; and I pray you to be assured of the pleasure I felt at hearing that the place lately filled by Mr de Marbois, near the Sovereignty of these States, was so happily supplied—On this...
I labour under Many Afflictions On Acct of the Orphans, Money is Such a Scarce Article amongst us, that there are scarcely coming at any, the Rents & profits of the Estate wou’d (could they be Collected) plentifully Answer all demands—but Fortitude & Patience is my only resource—However in the space of two or three Months I hope to be able to remit £200—I have Sent a Small Supply at present of...
I have received your letter of the 21st of July together with the Treatise on Agriculture & practical Husbandry. I consider the latter as a mark of attention which merits my warmest acknowledgments. It is a subject highly worthy the attention of every gentleman in this country who has leisure, abilities, or opportunity to improve it. It is the only source from which we can at present draw any...
I congratulate you upon the success of that inestimable Constitution, which I had the honor to witness your weighty and influential support and approbation of; and it is with singular pleasure I stand informed, that you have the unanimous suffrages of the Electors, to fill the Chair of first President. I take the liberty to solicit Your Excellency for an appointment as Collector or receiver of...
26[Diary entry: 22 October 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 22d. Thermometer at 49 in the Morning 60 at Noon and 60 at Night. Clear all day with the Wind (especially in the Night) fresh from So. Wt. Sent Mrs. O’Conner to Alexa. Rid to the Plantations at the Ferry, French’s & Dogue run. At the latter, the hands from the two first except the Ferry men & Carts, together with their plows as were the Plows of Muddy were all at work digging...
Since my arrival here I have written you two or three hasty letters—being constantly involved in Business or Company from wh. it would not be here very practicable or perhaps prudent to retreat, I have been able to write but very little—The Convention this moment adjourned and I am writing in their Chamber—a Question being about to be put on the mode of adoption which you have seen, we moved...
28[Diary entry: 31 January 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 31st. Thermometer at 42 in the Morning—40 at Noon and 34 at Night. The morning was a little cloudy but the weather soon cleared with a brisk No. Wester which occasioned a great change in the air. Planted a few pine trees in my Wildernesses.
Your favour of 21st instant came to my hands Yesterday: and I now comply with your request as far as in my power. The report of the Committee of Council at Quebec to Lord Dorchester was sent early in the last Spring by a Gentleman of Glasgow to a friend of mine, as an authentick paper transmitted to the British Ministry. It seems Canada is now divided into two Provences, and the part of it...
Permit one of the lowest of the people to approach you with every sentiment of Gratitude and Respect which has been, or can be expressed by any individual, or collective Body in the Union. Likewise to intrude upon your patience with a request, which if inconsistent with your inclination to admit, must rely on your well-known candour to pardon the impertinent intrusion. I am a person Sir of a...
31[Diary entry: 7 March 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 7th. Thermometer at 34 in the Morning—⟨4⟩6 at Noon and 42 at Night. Morning clear & calm—grd. a little frozen. Wind pretty fresh afterwards from the Northwest—notwithstanding which it lowered a good deal towards evening. I rid to Muddy hole and Dogue run Plantations and by the grd. where the ferry hands were at work.
I receivd the Letter which you did me the honor to write me, as well as the institution of the Cincinnatus Society formd by the American Army, I am much flatterd to be comprisd in a military Society the members of which have with So much glory concurrd under the Orders of your Excellency to establish American Liberty, but it gives me great pain to See, that all the General Officers of the Sea,...
33[Diary entry: 15 March 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 15th. Thermometer at 46 in the Morning—58 at Noon And 56 at Night. The Wind, tho’ there was but little of it, was at No. Wt. Mild and warm. Visited all the Plantations. At all of them, the full compliment of Plows were at work and going on very well. In the Neck, the Women were spreading Dung on the ground intended for Oats and Barley—being the West part of No. 2. At this place ⟨also⟩...
34[Diary entry: 12 November 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 12th. Thermometer at 44 in the Morning—52 at Noon and 51 at Night. Wind at So. Wt. all day & pleasant—Clear in the morning, but a little lowering towards 3 oclock—clear afterwards. The force of yesterday was employed in the roads to day. Mrs. and Miss Stuart went away after breakfast. I rid to the repairers of the Road and to my New Barn—the Rafters of which were all raised about...
Your favor of the 25th in answer to mine of the preceeding week, came safely. At the time I wrote that letter, I was uninformed of the circumstances which you have since made me acquainted with. However, you will be at no loss from the contents of it, to discern that it was Bargains I had in contemplation; and which, from the quantity of Goods at Market—Scarcity of Cash, according to Newspaper...
I have the most melancholy Task to perform, that was ever yet imposed upon me; that of making you acquainted with the Death of my poor Brother Tench. Painful however as it is, I thought a duty not to be dispensed with towards one for whom he had so high a Reverence & so warm an Attachment as for yourself. Not above three days before his death every symptom bade fair for a speedy Recovery, when...
I came to this place to day, tomorrow (wind permitting) I shall cross the Bay on my way to Philadelphia—Hearing that a Ship with Servants is gone up to Baltimore, and fearing from your answer to my letter (written some time ago from Mount Vernon) that I had not sufficiently explained my meaning I beg leave to inform you that tho’ I should have preferred German Servants, yet I did not mean to...
38[Diary entry: 21 February 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 21st. Thermometer at 40 in the Morning—40 at Noon and 38 at N. Clear, with the wind pretty fresh at No. West in the forenoon calm afterwards. A Mr. McPherson of Alexandria came & returned before dinner. His business was, to communicate the desires of a Neighbourhood in Berkeley County, to build a School & Meeting House on some Land of mine there, leased to one . My answer was, that if...
The articles which you shipped on my Acct on board of the Charming Polly have arrived safe & in good order. As I am under the necessity of purchasing, every year, a quantity of coarse Linen, Blanketings &ca for the clothing of my negroes, and sundry other articles for various purposes, and Goods of every kind being sold in Alexandria at a high advance, I am desireous of knowing if I could not...
Letter not found: to Tench Tilghman, 6 Dec. 1785. Tilghman wrote on 13 Dec : “I have been honored with both your letters of the 30h and 6h instant.”
It was not till last evening I discovered that a packet, which I had done myself the honor to address to you by a private conveyance, had been forgotten by the person to whom it was entrusted. To prevent a similar accident, and to avoid any farther delay, I take the liberty to forward the enclosed pamphlets (which are transmitted at the request of our State Society) by post. Unable to decline,...
42[Diary entry: 5 April 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 5th. Thermometer at 51 in the Morning—64 at Noon And 63 at Night. Clear and warm all day, but little wind and that at Easterly. Visited all the Plantations. In the Neck, the same work as yesterday was going forward. At Muddy hole the same also. At Dogue run the same. The two plows at this place finished breaking up the turnip ground in No. 1 about dinner time yesterday & went...
Your favors of the 26th of May, 13th of June and 7th instt are before me; and I believe unacknowledged—The several Articles sent by the Packet came safe, except one of the Wheels belonging to the harrows which was not landed by Captn Ellwood who dropped them at my landing as he passed by in the Night returning. Whether the omission was in him or in putting them on board in Philadelphia I know...
My letter of the 18th of July to the Honorable the Secretary at War, (which he promises to shew your Excellency) will I hope explain to your satisfaction my reason for not writing you frequently: Since that time the Virginia Troops at this Post by order of General Lincoln have been discharged & paid four months agreeable to a Resolution of Congress of the 26th of May, without the most distant...
45[Diary entry: 2 December 1788] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 2d. Thermometer at 37 in the morning—47 at Noon and 46 at Night. Clear, with the Wind at No. Wt. but not strong. Visited all the Plantations. In the Neck, the People were gathering Beans, corn, and drawing them in. Only 5 plows were at Work—the Waggon being employed in drawing in Corn. That part of the Corn which was intermixed with Carrots, would be gathered (tho’ not measured) to...
46[Diary entry: 11 March 1786] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 11th. Thermometer at 34 in the Morning—44 at Noon and 40 at Night. Weather clear and cool, Wind at No. West, and ground hard froze in the Morning. Rode to all my Plantns. and to the Mill. On my Return found a Mr. James Hains, the Manager of the James River Canal here—sent by the Directors to me—and to proceed with Letters from me to the Potomack and Susquehanna Works which being...
The Honorable the Congress having by their Proclamation of the 18th Inst. thought proper to discharge their Army I am to desire that immediately on the receipt of this you proceed to discharge the Troops under your Command at Philada. You will please to call at the War Office for Blank discharges—and Report to me your proceedings in this business. I am Sir Your most Obedient Servant NHi .
I must appologise for not answering your esteemed favours of 1st & 2d Ulto (which reached me about a fourtnight ago) before this Time but hope you will excuse me when I enform you of the Occasion. A number of losses in Trade during & since the war had so much involved my Affairs that altho’ I had property in value equal to what I owed it was so much scatterd that I found myself under a...
Mr Fraunces’s letters to you & to me, the last of which I also enclose for your perusal, are so expressive of his wants as to render it unnecessary for me to add ought, on the occasion of them. He has been considered (tho’ confined within the british lines) as a friend to our cause: It is said he was remarkably attentive to our prisoners in the City of New York; supporting them, as far as his...
I Have Received Your first favour from Philadelphia with the Greater Satisfaction, as it promises me the pleasure to Hear Again from you Before long —a pleasure, My Beloved General, which Your friend’s filial Heart wants to Anticipate, and Enjoys most Affectionately—I Have not Been surprised to Hear of Your Attendance at the Convention, and would indeed Have wondered at a denial—on the success...